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BANGKOK 18 April 2019 21:56
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george

Concrete Posts Touted As Latest Tourist Attraction

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Concrete posts touted as latest tourist attraction

MUKDAHAN: -- Concrete posts in the middle of a river may not seem like an obvious tourist draw, but local officials in Thailand's northeastern province of Mukdahan hope that French colonial-era pillars in the Mekong River will attract tourists due to its historical importance.

According to Mukdahan Governor Phairat Sakonphan, the posts in the Mekong River in Wan Yai district were constructed by French army engineers in 1893 when Laos was still a French colony, as a means of showing safe navigation routes.

Land transport at the time was mainly on elephant, while the French used several steamboats on the Mekong River, some of which were able to transport up to 200 passengers.

However, the large number of rocks and shallows in the river made navigation posts essential.

Several of the boats in fact sunk, and one, the Maurice, can still be seen.

Mr. Phairat noted that the presence of the posts was indicative of the advancements made in French engineering in the 19th century.

The provincial authorities are now coordinating with local tour operators to organize trips on the Mekong River to see the posts.

According to Mr. Phairat, the Bt20 trips are already proving a tourism draw.

--TNA 2005-01-20

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Hey Georgie..

My avatar is much cooler than yours,, but still nice.

cheers :o

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Concrete posts touted as latest tourist attraction

MUKDAHAN: -- Concrete posts in the middle of a river may not seem like an obvious tourist draw, but local officials in Thailand's northeastern province of Mukdahan hope that French colonial-era pillars in the Mekong River will attract tourists due to its historical importance.

According to Mukdahan Governor Phairat Sakonphan, the posts in the Mekong River in Wan Yai district were constructed by French army engineers in 1893 when Laos was still a French colony, as a means of showing safe navigation routes.

Land transport at the time was mainly on elephant, while the French used several steamboats on the Mekong River, some of which were able to transport up to 200 passengers.

However, the large number of rocks and shallows in the river made navigation posts essential.

Several of the boats in fact sunk, and one, the Maurice, can still be seen.

Mr. Phairat noted that the presence of the posts was indicative of the advancements made in French engineering in the 19th century.

The provincial authorities are now coordinating with local tour operators to organize trips on the Mekong River to see the posts.

According to Mr. Phairat, the Bt20 trips are already proving a tourism draw.

--TNA 2005-01-20

Have they cleaned the concrete posts up!! or are they still painted with Orange Dayglo, a souvenir from 59 Squadron Royal Engineers in 1963, after a sundays Lao Kao convention !! 2 assault boots were lost in the process, I think photographic evidence of our escapade is on display in the RE Regimental museum, along with a piece of concrete from the 800metre by 3000metre slab conveniently left in the paddyfields outside Leong Nok Tha. nignoy

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Concrete posts touted as latest tourist attraction

According to Mr. Phairat, the Bt20 trips are already proving a tourism draw.

--TNA 2005-01-20

Yeh! Bht 20 for Thais, Bht 250 for farangs? No thanks, I'll look at my gate posts for nowt!

:o

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Concrete posts touted as latest tourist attraction

MUKDAHAN: -- Concrete posts in the middle of a river may not seem like an obvious tourist draw, but local officials in Thailand's northeastern province of Mukdahan hope that French colonial-era pillars in the Mekong River will attract tourists due to its historical importance.

According to Mukdahan Governor Phairat Sakonphan, the posts in the Mekong River in Wan Yai district were constructed by French army engineers in 1893 when Laos was still a French colony, as a means of showing safe navigation routes.

Land transport at the time was mainly on elephant, while the French used several steamboats on the Mekong River, some of which were able to transport up to 200 passengers.

However, the large number of rocks and shallows in the river made navigation posts essential.

Several of the boats in fact sunk, and one, the Maurice, can still be seen.

Mr. Phairat noted that the presence of the posts was indicative of the advancements made in French engineering in the 19th century.

The provincial authorities are now coordinating with local tour operators to organize trips on the Mekong River to see the posts.

According to Mr. Phairat, the Bt20 trips are already proving a tourism draw.

--TNA 2005-01-20

Have they cleaned the concrete posts up!! or are they still painted with Orange Dayglo, a souvenir from 59 Squadron Royal Engineers in 1963, after a sundays Lao Kao convention !! 2 assault boots were lost in the process, I think photographic evidence of our escapade is on display in the RE Regimental museum, along with a piece of concrete from the 800metre by 3000metre slab conveniently left in the paddyfields outside Leong Nok Tha. nignoy

I heard that a few sapper sprogs were left behind as well(?) :o

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Perhaps they will run tours of the concrete posts in Bangkok, marking the

line of the elevated railway out to Don Muang, in a few years time.

Rather like a Thai Stonehenge!!

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I feel the Thais are very much like my old man.............will never do away with anything that may come in handy later! :o

Could be why I am still around! :D

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