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Jingthing

Thais Are Not Very Open To Their Neighbors Cooking!

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There might be lots of 'Lao' cooking however my wife won't touch 99% of the crap when we visit Thailand. One of the main differences is that Thai's use far more sugar than real Lao cooking. When we visit Bangkok it is real difficult to get food that for my wife is edible usually we'll end up eating at street stalls where they cook the food there and then so we can tell them not put in sugar etc.

Some of the supposedly same dishes between Vientiane and Bangkok are VERY different . . .

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Imagine the USA without Mexican restaurants! But, funny thing, I never once came across a CANADIAN restaurant in the US.

hahah, what about Swiss Chalet?!?! oh wait...

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One thing I have begun to wonder about... How can people taste the food when they pile on the chili? I like chilis as much as the next person, but I am coming to believe that people loading up on the chilis just do because they have become accustomed to the burn rather than the taste. Are there any chefs on here who can comment on this?

I remember years ago, I was in a BBQ shop in the States and my friend's order was extra spicy. Anyway, when the order arrived it was so hot that she could not taste the food. She actually called the owner from the kitchen and complained that she could not taste the food. I hadn't thought about that until I read this topic... Must have been 23 years ago... :o

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One thing I have begun to wonder about... How can people taste the food when they pile on the chili? I like chilis as much as the next person, but I am coming to believe that people loading up on the chilis just do because they have become accustomed to the burn rather than the taste. Are there any chefs on here who can comment on this?

I remember years ago, I was in a BBQ shop in the States and my friend's order was extra spicy. Anyway, when the order arrived it was so hot that she could not taste the food. She actually called the owner from the kitchen and complained that she could not taste the food. I hadn't thought about that until I read this topic... Must have been 23 years ago... :o

A long time back I was sitting with a farang friend at an eating place and the cook gave us something to try as she wanted our opinion - it was quite heavily loaded with chillies. I commented that it was very nice but I didn't really like the fermented fish flavour. My friend didn't even know there was fish in it, he could only taste the chili. I was more accustomed to spicy food than my friend so I could still taste the food.

Chili, in the right quantities enhances, doesn't disguise the flavour, but the quantities have to be right for the person who is eating. Maybe that is why chillies or often added afterwards by the diner.

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Is this culinary xenophobia?

no, it's just Jingthing's paranoia associating each and everything thai with xenophobia :o

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Is this culinary xenophobia?

no, it's just Jingthing's paranoia associating each and everything thai with xenophobia :o

There is nothing the slightest bit "paranoid" about any of my posts on this topic. I merely would like to see more food from neighboring countries in Thailand. How would you characterize in a nutshell the phenomena in Thailand of ignoring their neighbor's cuisine? Culinary ignorance? Culinary arrogance? In any case, if I found in Paris that there weren't any Italian, German, and Spanish restaurants I would call the French the same thing (but I won't because there are).

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With exceptions, I have foudn Thais to be extremely hesitant to eat food other than Thai.  (Japanese and Italian food does seem to ba an exception, though, with most Thais liking what they think is authentic Japanese and Italian.)

My business partner is one such exception (as is a current lady-friend).  I went to Tacos & Salsa yesterday, and I brought an alambre to work with me this morning for him to try during lunch. We had two associates from another company come for a meeting, and they ate with us.  When we brought out the alambre, my partner dug into it with gusto, but the two other men, both well-educated and travelled, looked on with disgusting fascination and would not try even a small taste.

I do think this is slowly shifting, but overall, Thais are very, very lmited in what they will eat inasfar as international cuisine goes.

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With exceptions, I have foudn Thais to be extremely hesitant to eat food other than Thai.  (Japanese and Italian food does seem to ba an exception, though, with most Thais liking what they think is authentic Japanese and Italian.)

My business partner is one such exception (as is a current lady-friend).  I went to Tacos & Salsa yesterday, and I brought an alambre to work with me this morning for him to try during lunch. We had two associates from another company come for a meeting, and they ate with us.  When we brought out the alambre, my partner dug into it with gusto, but the two other men, both well-educated and travelled, looked on with disgusting fascination and would not try even a small taste.

I do think this is slowly shifting, but overall, Thais are very, very lmited in what they will eat inasfar as international cuisine goes.

Their loss! or as they would say "som nom na".

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Their loss! or as they would say "som nom na".

Its our loss too if we live here, as its hard to get regional SE Asian food in Thailand.

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pattaya with british, german, russian, indian, korean, japanese, malay, french has a diverse range but these are typically run by immigrants, thus the problem of a missing cuisine is not the fault of the locals but rather lack of the nationals whose cuisine is "missing"

melbourne, australia, has vietnamese, thai, laotian, sudanese, russian, french, korean, belgian, italian, spanish, nepalese, tibetan, indian, greek etc. sometimes whole streets are dedicated to a country's cuisine, victoria st, richmond has 30+ vietnamese restaurants in one mile.

Lygon street heaps of italian, chinatown lots of ... !

Why the variety? i contend it is the fact that there are so many migrants - we are the lucky country for food

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I have to agree with alot of the above. But things are improving..slowly. Ten years ago I wouldn't have believed that Thais would ever eat Japanese food but now the Malls are packed with Sushi places.

Yes when they go overseas they really do seem lost without their own food and pretty unwilling to try anything else.. Though I hate to generalise as my GF and her sister both love 'farang' food and seem to prefer Italian food to almost anything else.. They have finally realised that food doesn't have to be blisteringly hot to be delicious..

Going to Europe opened their eyes to flavour. Mainly because the cold water fish/shellfish there has so much flavour when compared to the warm water variety they could enjoy it without 'nam jim' or other overpowering flavours.. Same could be said about Lamb, Beef and preserved meats like bacon/ham.

They understand now that western food often relies on wholly the quality of it's ingredients for flavour. Tastless meat/fish etc leads to a tasteless dishes.. Thai food on the other hand has less emphasis on the quality/flavour of the meat/fish.. The use of aromatics (garlic, chilli etc) produces the flavour and adding herbs at the end of the coking process adds aroma..

Seems that once they get the simple, tasty, fresh food message they really can enjoy other cuisines..

Travelling is good for people of all nationalities. and Thais have only recently begun to travel.. 20yrs back Singaporeans were the same.. Only eating Singaporean food.. Now the place is awash with foreign restaurants and they travel and experiment with new food often.

Thailand will eventually do the same.. It's just another step on the road to full developement.. Even the UK was the same in the late 60's The upper classed may have eaten continental food but the masses never did until the boom in package tourism took them to Europe and they discovered new favorites..

Like Jingthing. I'm amazed at the ignorance of Thai about the food of neigboring countries.. especially Malaysian and Viet food.. Two of my favourites.. Even simple Malay/Indian food like Murtabak, Biryani and Nasi Lemak that have local equivelents here are very pale imatations of the original. Others that share things with Thai cuisine like Otak otak and Asam Laksa simply don't exist here.. which is a shame.

Once again I can only blame the Govt and their inward looking 'Thai is best' attitude that prevent people from being more curious about the World..

Not quite true. Fuji has been around longer than that.

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Most Thais that own restaurants don't get around to much i.e. other countries due simply to the cost. Most of the people from the surrounding countries do not get to Thailand because of immigration and expense thus no culinary exchange. Thailand has so many regional foods as well, people from Bangkok come to Chiang Mai to eat Northern food, while I agree it may be funny that no one in Bangkok has opened one or more restaurants that serve regional Thai dishes it's not surprising they haven't added foods from the surrounding countries.

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One thing I have begun to wonder about... How can people taste the food when they pile on the chili? I like chilis as much as the next person, but I am coming to believe that people loading up on the chilis just do because they have become accustomed to the burn rather than the taste. Are there any chefs on here who can comment on this?

I remember years ago, I was in a BBQ shop in the States and my friend's order was extra spicy. Anyway, when the order arrived it was so hot that she could not taste the food. She actually called the owner from the kitchen and complained that she could not taste the food. I hadn't thought about that until I read this topic... Must have been 23 years ago... :)

I can answer this, I am a very spicy food lover, when you get to a point where you can handle just about anything, you can taste the chili with the food and it has a certain kick to it. Once you experience this it will always be something you will love. Its sort of hard to explain though. Thats the best I can come up with

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My Thai girl never believed the hygiene standard of Thai food, makes us Western have weak stumaches in the beginning when we are not used to it. She has been a while in Europe, got used to the "quality food", went back and got the same problems. NOW she believes.

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