Jump to content
BANGKOK
Sign in to follow this  
CaptainCanuck

Hypnosis!

Recommended Posts

Hypnotherapy has an excellent track-record of getting to people to quit smoking. That surprises me, because there aren’t a lot of good hypnotherapists out there! As a hypnotherapist, I want people to have a good experience, so I thought I’d give you a few tips on how to choose a hypnotherapist, and what to expect from hypnotherapy. These are my personal opinions.

When choosing a hypnotherapist:

  • Ask the Hypnotherapist (HT) if they do rapid inductions. If they don't, your hypnotherapist is probably incompetent. A slow induction is okay during the first few sessions, but after that it's a waste of time.

  • Ask your HT if they do 'regression' or 'parts therapy'. If they don't, they are, in my opinion, lacking some of the most powerful tools that HT's can use.

  • Ask how long it will take to see results. If you aren't promised results within 6 - 7 sessions, then your HT is probably incompetent.

Be wary of psychologists/psychotherapists who use hypnotherapy. Often they feel that hypnotherapy is just one of the 'tools' in their toolbox. This means that they might not be as proficient at using it as a regular HT. However, if you find a psychologist or psychotherapist that really loves hypnosis, you've probably struck gold.

What to expect in hypnotherapy:

  • The most common misconception is that you loose consciousness in hypnosis. You don't. You can see, hear, talk, and think in hypnosis. Occasionally some people forget parts of their sessions, but it's not that common.

  • Hypnosis feels great! Most of my clients come out of a session feeling fantastic. Try scheduling an appointment during the low-point of your day (afternoon for most people) and you'll come out of it very refreshed.

  • Hypnosis can be emotional. Sometimes we go back to painful memories using hypnosis. This can often be quite un-emotional, or it can be very dramatic. It's a purge, and always at the end of the session clients feel much, much better than they did.

With regards to smoking, a hypnotherapist has to uncover and address all the needs that smoking fulfills, even if it’s just a false perception that smoking fulfills these needs.

For example, many smokers feel like smoking relaxes them. It doesn’t matter that smoking technically does the opposite (it’s a stimulant); the perception is that it’s stress relieving. That perception – and the need to relax - has to be dealt with in hypnosis.

Also, it’s important to address each and every situation where a smoker smokes automatically, such as in the morning with a coffee, in the car, on the telephone. This is where hypnosis shines, because these are such ‘automatic’ behaviors, and hard to address without hypnosis.

If needs and automatic behavior aren’t specifically addressed, then hypnotherapy may not last. Many hypnotherapists have high initial success rates with quitting smoking, but if you follow their clients for a longer time, they relapse. This is because the hypnotherapists haven’t been thorough.

Another key area that a hypnotist has to work with is the feeling that many smokers have those cigarettes will be ‘missed’ in the future, or that life won’t be as good or enjoyable without cigarettes. In other words, they feel like they’re depriving themselves. As a hypnotherapist, I can create a very vivid and motivating image for the subconscious mind to focus on - an image of the future where everything is better without cigarettes: food, sex, energy etc. etc.

There are more techniques involved in getting people to give up smoking, but I’ll leave it there for now. If you have more questions, please message me; I love discussing hypnosis and hypnotherapy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hypnotherapy has an excellent track-record of getting to people to quit smoking. That surprises me, because there aren’t a lot of good hypnotherapists out there! As a hypnotherapist, I want people to have a good experience, so I thought I’d give you a few tips on how to choose a hypnotherapist, and what to expect from hypnotherapy. These are my personal opinions.

When choosing a hypnotherapist:

  • Ask the Hypnotherapist (HT) if they do rapid inductions. If they don't, your hypnotherapist is probably incompetent. A slow induction is okay during the first few sessions, but after that it's a waste of time.

  • Ask your HT if they do 'regression' or 'parts therapy'. If they don't, they are, in my opinion, lacking some of the most powerful tools that HT's can use.

  • Ask how long it will take to see results. If you aren't promised results within 6 - 7 sessions, then your HT is probably incompetent.

Be wary of psychologists/psychotherapists who use hypnotherapy. Often they feel that hypnotherapy is just one of the 'tools' in their toolbox. This means that they might not be as proficient at using it as a regular HT. However, if you find a psychologist or psychotherapist that really loves hypnosis, you've probably struck gold.

What to expect in hypnotherapy:

  • The most common misconception is that you loose consciousness in hypnosis. You don't. You can see, hear, talk, and think in hypnosis. Occasionally some people forget parts of their sessions, but it's not that common.

  • Hypnosis feels great! Most of my clients come out of a session feeling fantastic. Try scheduling an appointment during the low-point of your day (afternoon for most people) and you'll come out of it very refreshed.

  • Hypnosis can be emotional. Sometimes we go back to painful memories using hypnosis. This can often be quite un-emotional, or it can be very dramatic. It's a purge, and always at the end of the session clients feel much, much better than they did.

With regards to smoking, a hypnotherapist has to uncover and address all the needs that smoking fulfills, even if it’s just a false perception that smoking fulfills these needs.

For example, many smokers feel like smoking relaxes them. It doesn’t matter that smoking technically does the opposite (it’s a stimulant); the perception is that it’s stress relieving. That perception – and the need to relax - has to be dealt with in hypnosis.

Also, it’s important to address each and every situation where a smoker smokes automatically, such as in the morning with a coffee, in the car, on the telephone. This is where hypnosis shines, because these are such ‘automatic’ behaviors, and hard to address without hypnosis.

If needs and automatic behavior aren’t specifically addressed, then hypnotherapy may not last. Many hypnotherapists have high initial success rates with quitting smoking, but if you follow their clients for a longer time, they relapse. This is because the hypnotherapists haven’t been thorough.

Another key area that a hypnotist has to work with is the feeling that many smokers have those cigarettes will be ‘missed’ in the future, or that life won’t be as good or enjoyable without cigarettes. In other words, they feel like they’re depriving themselves. As a hypnotherapist, I can create a very vivid and motivating image for the subconscious mind to focus on - an image of the future where everything is better without cigarettes: food, sex, energy etc. etc.

There are more techniques involved in getting people to give up smoking, but I’ll leave it there for now. If you have more questions, please message me; I love discussing hypnosis and hypnotherapy.

Very well put! Check out the hypnosis shows in Bangkok and Pattaya.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where are hypnosis shows in Bangkok? I am very interested in hypnosis, NLP, weight loss, smoking, drinking and seeking some quality training too - advice / help you give is greatly and gratefully received smile.gif

Bounder

Hypnotherapy has an excellent track-record of getting to people to quit smoking. That surprises me, because there aren't a lot of good hypnotherapists out there! As a hypnotherapist, I want people to have a good experience, so I thought I'd give you a few tips on how to choose a hypnotherapist, and what to expect from hypnotherapy. These are my personal opinions.

When choosing a hypnotherapist:

  • Ask the Hypnotherapist (HT) if they do rapid inductions. If they don't, your hypnotherapist is probably incompetent. A slow induction is okay during the first few sessions, but after that it's a waste of time.

  • Ask your HT if they do 'regression' or 'parts therapy'. If they don't, they are, in my opinion, lacking some of the most powerful tools that HT's can use.

  • Ask how long it will take to see results. If you aren't promised results within 6 - 7 sessions, then your HT is probably incompetent.

Be wary of psychologists/psychotherapists who use hypnotherapy. Often they feel that hypnotherapy is just one of the 'tools' in their toolbox. This means that they might not be as proficient at using it as a regular HT. However, if you find a psychologist or psychotherapist that really loves hypnosis, you've probably struck gold.

What to expect in hypnotherapy:

  • The most common misconception is that you loose consciousness in hypnosis. You don't. You can see, hear, talk, and think in hypnosis. Occasionally some people forget parts of their sessions, but it's not that common.

  • Hypnosis feels great! Most of my clients come out of a session feeling fantastic. Try scheduling an appointment during the low-point of your day (afternoon for most people) and you'll come out of it very refreshed.

  • Hypnosis can be emotional. Sometimes we go back to painful memories using hypnosis. This can often be quite un-emotional, or it can be very dramatic. It's a purge, and always at the end of the session clients feel much, much better than they did.

With regards to smoking, a hypnotherapist has to uncover and address all the needs that smoking fulfills, even if it's just a false perception that smoking fulfills these needs.

For example, many smokers feel like smoking relaxes them. It doesn't matter that smoking technically does the opposite (it's a stimulant); the perception is that it's stress relieving. That perception – and the need to relax - has to be dealt with in hypnosis.

Also, it's important to address each and every situation where a smoker smokes automatically, such as in the morning with a coffee, in the car, on the telephone. This is where hypnosis shines, because these are such 'automatic' behaviors, and hard to address without hypnosis.

If needs and automatic behavior aren't specifically addressed, then hypnotherapy may not last. Many hypnotherapists have high initial success rates with quitting smoking, but if you follow their clients for a longer time, they relapse. This is because the hypnotherapists haven't been thorough.

Another key area that a hypnotist has to work with is the feeling that many smokers have those cigarettes will be 'missed' in the future, or that life won't be as good or enjoyable without cigarettes. In other words, they feel like they're depriving themselves. As a hypnotherapist, I can create a very vivid and motivating image for the subconscious mind to focus on - an image of the future where everything is better without cigarettes: food, sex, energy etc. etc.

There are more techniques involved in getting people to give up smoking, but I'll leave it there for now. If you have more questions, please message me; I love discussing hypnosis and hypnotherapy.

Very well put! Check out the hypnosis shows in Bangkok and Pattaya.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whilst the OP comes across as an advert, and has perhaps disappeared by now, the overall gist of what's been stated is partly accurate. Bearing in mind we all have our different views and opinions, I disagree with him putting off people by stating that unless 'regression' or 'parts' therapy is used then the therapist is somehow lacking. Its also a bit unprofessional to talk about 'rapid inductions' without explaining what that means - nor do I agree with his view on that. How qualified he is to have an opinion on psychologists/psychotherapists I don't know....not very I would guess.

As for 5-6 sessions being the limit, thats rubbish and that's why I think the OP is touting for business, which is sad scaremongering. One session of 1.5 hours is usually enough, and most therapists will offer a free follow-up if it doesn't quite take.

There are good and bad practitioners everywhere - a good therapist will know their material. 'Scripts' for all ailments you can think of exist as tried and tested templates for therapy; a poor therapist will sit there turning over pages reading them out, rather than knowing it.

Don't let anyone put you off trying hypnotherapy if it appeals to you - it is a phenomenal tool for change if you're open to it. Stopping smoking via hypnotherapy (not stage hypnotism @ the member asking about 'shows') can be incredibly effective; it doesn't work for some but it works for many. For the price it's worth the experience; the worst that can happen is you'll feel very relaxed afterwards - the best, you won't be smoking!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I quit with hypnotherapy. I had been smoking for 27 years or so and finally quit in February 2010. I had just about given up hope of ever giving up, but really wanted to quit. Hypnotherapy seemed to be just what was needed to get me over the last mental hurdle.

The bitch of it was that it was all so easy. No cravings, no irritability and no way I will go back to smoking. In fact in the first three days after therapy (as a single session that lasted about 1.5 to 2 hours)I felt on top of the world and people said that they had noticed that I seemed unusually happy.

Will never regret going, just regret that I hadn't tried this route sooner. Prior to hypnosis, I had read The Easy Way by Allen Carr, read other books, tried listening to hypnosis tapes, cold turkey (willpower), etc without success and was getting to my wits end. I believe that I had, perhaps (and here I have got to agree with Allen Carr), accepted all the hype and convinced/brainwashed myself into believing it would be exceedingly difficult, that I had no hope, that I could not quit. In reality it was exceedingly easy with hypnosis pushing me over the top to success.

Nevertheless, people have got to realize that it is not the golden bullet. You must really want to quit. If you go into hypnosis (pun not intended) half hearted or only because your wife/gf asked you to quit, it is unlikely to work.

I found the hypnotherapist I went to through an ad he placed in the Thai Visa classifieds. I did not post before because I felt it was too soon, but now can confirm it really did work for me as I am still free of the habit 9 months on. Even in situations where others are smoking does not bother me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To Floppy Member

Would you be kind enough to share the name and contacts for the hypnotherapist you used.

I for one am very keen on this therapy, having gone through the whole array of quit techniques too, and despite quitting 1 year with Allen Carr's book

(By the way he died last year of, you guessed it - lung cancer..)

Thanks in advance and may you stay smoke free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CaptainCanuk appears to have left the building, and there were a few requests for someone to contact, so...

I am a full-time hypnotherapist in Bangkok, next to Asok BTS, with a current ad in the classifieds section, and a link to my website in my profile.

I would be happy to talk on the phone about questions on the process of hypnotherapy, hypnosis or NLP to stop smoking. I will also ask you about how the process you must run to continue smoking, even if and when a larger part of you wants to quit smoking.

There is some good general information in this post, but there comes a time when it's best to get into specifics. Everyone has their own subjective experience, so a focused one to one discussion can create clarity on how it works for your situation. There are a number tricks of the mind you can see through to get your subconscious mind on your side (limiting beliefs, triggers, perceptions etc)

I quit smoking myself using hypnosis, and I know how I did it and what was true for me. As a professional, working on smoking with hundreds of people, I need to find out what works for them. There are a few different 'types' of smoker and distinctions to be made, even though the core process has a unifying thread. A little flexibility goes a long way to getting it done much more easily.

Edited by MarkWBeale

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After reflecting on a couple of points up for discussion, I thought I'd share some of my experiences based on six years as a full time professional hypnotherapist, and the qualities that help people successfully stop smoking.

We all have beliefs and ways of doing things that can change with experience and flexibility. This applies to smokers looking to quit, and hypnotherapists.

I tend to agree with Damacles that fewer sessions are required for smoking. My approach has developed from…

Three Sessions; I started my practice offering a three session strategy for smoking. This worked very well, with clients coming in once a week.

Two Sessions; Then I noticed some of my clients, especially those who had to travel from other cities, were confidently saying they knew they would never smoke again after just two sessions, so they felt they didn't need to come in for a third session. Instead I would see one of their friends as a referral. I stay in contact with my clients, and enjoy getting 'it's my third year anniversary' emails, so they could prove to me they were right to pass on the third session.

I ensure all my clients have a strong genuine motivation to be successful; sometimes they arrive with it, like GaryP, sometimes I help increase their own a genuine motivation. For the people that managed it in two sessions, they had a strong motivation not just to be successful, but a motivation to be successful in a quicker time, (due to having to travel) which played a part in their ability to reduce their amount of sessions.

One Session; Then, while working in a resorts, people would often come in for a session the day before their flight home, so there was only one session possible. At first I felt inclined to turn down the single session, saying 'I prefer not to start something I may not be able to finish.' But the clients had already met me, and we had discussed and understood hypnosis and their situation. They were insistent they wanted a session and were confident they would get what they needed. On that basis, I agreed and I found I was able to use my experience to focus in quickly on what would be the key breakthrough for that person, and boil down the essentials into an extended single session.

At this time I also developed a program of two hypnosis MP3s, of about 25 minutes each, that I gave to people to use as follow up. In the past I was able to do follow up through sessions in person, but I found I was able to use some skillful MP3s to speak to the varieties of smoker types and still be effective.

So by being client focused, and listening to people's thoughts and feelings about what would work for them, I was able to be flexible enough to adapt my approach to fit them. I also needed the flexibility to recognize that the skills I had as a hypnotherapist and the programs I developed in previous years were continuing to develop, so the beliefs I had about how long I could take to work with someone could also evolve.

Here are some observations on the comments made in this thread. They bring up some common useful experiences that are keys to success in stopping smoking.

Limiting beliefs; by implication, GaryP hit some key ones including 1) it is hard to stop smoking, 2) it takes a lot of conscious effort 3) there are painful side effects like irritation, stress or weight gain, 4) once a smoker always a smoker.

If there is no real strategy to stop smoking, no experience or education on tools and techniques on how to stop and a half-hearted motivation – then you will be able to prove that all these limiting 'beliefs' are reality! You may point to friends or experiences in your past to back up these beliefs with extra 'proof'. This can then lead to…

Limiting emotions;

1) Hopelessness; as GaryP said, "giving up hope of ever giving up".

2) Frustration and irritation; since you have beliefs you can prove (from your subjective experience), then someone with different beliefs (i.e. if you are motivated, I can help make it easy for you in 2 sessions) is clearly wrong, and possibly full of BS.

As GaryP then says; "The bitch of it was that it was all so easy." This is a great way of putting it. It was actually great for him that he got what he really wanted easily. The bitch about it was that the limiting beliefs that had governed his behaviors for many years were 'wrong'.

There's a saying – "You can be right. Or, you can get what you want." In fact, I don't see it as even having to be about being 'right' or 'wrong', more just what ideas are helpful or unhelpful at that moment.

GaryP had an experience and realization that let him to quickly switch to a set of empowering beliefs that are helpful, and which he now has personal experience to prove it is equally possible for them to be true. This is one of the great things about hypnotherapy and accessing the subconscious mind, that it becomes possible to make such a quick and crucial perceptual shift to...

Empowering beliefs; 1) it can be surprisingly easy to stop smoking, 2) it takes some genuine motivation to really want to stop, but little conscious effort, because your subconscious works for you c) cravings are essential unnoticeable, overwhelmed by a 'top of the world' sense of well being d) I was born a non smoker, and I have returned to my natural state as a non smoker.

These beliefs become a more likely reality when you; have a genuine motivation, work in partnership with someone using a proven strategy based on wide experience, use the right tools and techniques in that moment, and start the process at the right time for you.

GaryP's quite right, if you only half-heartedly want to quit, or are only doing it because your wife/gf asked you, I would not accept the person as a client. No one can, or should, try to make you do something you don't really want to do. But if you really want to do it, and want it done most efficiently and easily, like anything, it's good to call in a professional.

I get all these factors working for my clients, so the 'empowering beliefs' quickly become the most obvious reality.

So these lead to…

Empowering emotions;

1) Relief, Strength, Control, Satisfaction, Achievement; quitting smoking for many people is the icing on the cake of the self-knowledge about the conscious and subconscious mind, and the ability it gives to quickly shift perspectives. This often flows through into many other aspects of their lives. People often ask; "If I can do that 'really difficult thing' so easily, what else have I thought was difficult can I do now?"

2) Relaxation, Peace; the whole idea of smoking as a source of stress relief, or the inner conscious debate that used to go on about it – is not so much as 'conquered' or 'beaten', as no longer arises. The problem of smoking isn't so much as 'solved' consciously, but 'dissolved' subconsciously. In its place can arise an authentically relaxing, rejuvenating, refreshing sense that the task of doing it was easy – and your state of being is at ease.

So overall, I have a two session strategy that gives a very high success rate, doing no more and no less than is required for the vast majority of people.

Possible exceptions are;

1) if there is an event within 12 months of the sessions that is traumatic or stressful, an extra session may be useful. For example, a loss like a divorce, major financial problem or death of a loved one – that is felt as a traumatic event affecting the motivation to live a long healthy life. The extra session will deal with the event, and help regain focus and recall that your health remains a core priority.

2) if there are other major life issues happening in peoples life right now. Some people come in to see you for Stop Smoking – but you discover that smoking is the least of their worries. If there is major stress, worry, anger, grief, personal or professional issues going on, it might be useful to address these with separate or connected sessions in addition to stopping smoking.

One way to put it is – if there is something burning inside the core of you, it can be most effective to put that out before dealing with the thing burning on the outside.

For most people it is simply the final push to switch off the habit once and for all, so two sessions is enough. For people with a lot of other things going on, smoking can be the thing that leads them to seek some assistance that can flow through into and really benefit a lot of areas of their health and life.

On the subject of Parts Therapy and Regression, they are both useful for smoking sessions. Mostly, these can be used in very focused and quick way for a simple habitual smoker. For more complex life issues, these and other tools can be used according to the situation and type of person. For example, some people are highly future focused, so they belief the past isn't relevant, so instead you can emphasize future progression…

This is another reason why an experienced or skillful hypnotherapist won't use a script, which Damacles rightly points out is a poor sign. In a hypnotic state the client can speak, so the hypnotherapist should be really listening, responding and refining the words and techniques used for that moment. Reading a script implies they are using Direct Suggestion as the main technique, which is very limited. Parts therapy, regression and other techniques generally involve dialogue with the client. A good hypnotherapist will ask similar core questions, but need to follow the unique responses to get to the key insight and realization. This cuts through the haze of limiting beliefs and emotion, creating the empowering clarity that comes when the smoke clears.

Now that's quite a long story for a guy who started off saying, 'if you want to talk about it, give me a call'. I hope this writing makes sense so you can relate to it or that it helps in some way. You're welcome to give me a call if you want to talk about your perception or situation.

Edited by MarkWBeale

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After reading the above posts, I thought I better add that I have not relapsed and remain an ex-smoker one year and four months later. It was all so easy. I can be in the company of smokers and it does not bother me in the slightest, apart from the fact that I no longer like the smell. I also am absolutely positive that I will never smoke again, apart from when I check out and my body is cremated. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although I'm not a smoker, I can understand how hypnosis can work when applied correctly. The mind is truly a powerful thing and sometimes we can limit it capabilities because we let our urges take over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two years to the day. No slips along the way. Never a real urge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I quit in 1993 after smoking for 30 years. I had one 55 minute hypnotherapy session and haven't smoked (or wanted to) since.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...