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rixalex

Indian Curries Don't Taste Hot Anymore

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Last week i went to an Indian restaurant in Bangkok and ordered a Lamb Vindaloo and asked for it to be served very, very hot - something i never would have dared do in the UK. Even just ordering a standard Vindaloo in the UK took some courage!

It didn't taste hot though - rather mild actually.

Since coming to Thailand i don't eat anything like as much Indian food as i did in the UK, but everytime i do, i find myself feeling a bit let down that there's no kick to it.

Is it to do with Indian food in Thailand being less spicy than Indian food in the UK? Or is it that my taste buds have adapted to spicy Thai food. I do love Thai food and through the years have progressively been asking for it spicier and spicier, so that could be it i guess.

What are your experiences?

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The spicy hot Thai dishes has raised your tolerance level of chilli.

I trained myself over 30 years ago to take spicy hot food - chewed chilli padi and sipped hot tea.

Hot water helps dissolve the layer of sticky chemical coating your tongue, and the hotness will gradually washes away. Cold water. on the other hand, maintains this sticky layer.

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The spicy hot Thai dishes has raised your tolerance level of chilli.

I trained myself over 30 years ago to take spicy hot food - chewed chilli padi and sipped hot tea.

Hot water helps dissolve the layer of sticky chemical coating your tongue, and the hotness will gradually washes away. Cold water. on the other hand, maintains this sticky layer.

Interesting.

May i ask, what is chilli padi?

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The same happened to me at a Indian Restaurant in BKK.After they had seen me coming a few times they asked me if i wanted more spicy(i don't mind if it's mild,but if i eat late in the evening,i find a little more chillie helps my digestion)Actually it didn't taste hot at all.I think they try to meet the western taste,i seldom see any Thais enjoy the Indian cuisine.When i was travelling in India many years ago,it was so spicy that i used to buy a bowl of curd to eat with the curry,it worked great!

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When i was travelling in India many years ago,it was so spicy that i used to buy a bowl of curd to eat with the curry,it worked great!

I visited India just cos i loved their food so much - well there might have been a few other reasons too - but i have to say i was pretty disappointed. Neither spicy nor tasty - perhaps i was just unlucky though.

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I am sure your tolerance increases with eating just regular Thai food.....in soups I have added dried chilli and sugar from the condiments for years now.....I think prior to that I never really ate them.

Did get caught out with a harmless looking apple and mint sauce in an indian one time

They had included crushed green chillies....... :) ...now that was hot!!

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The spicy hot Thai dishes has raised your tolerance level of chilli.

I trained myself over 30 years ago to take spicy hot food - chewed chilli padi and sipped hot tea.

Hot water helps dissolve the layer of sticky chemical coating your tongue, and the hotness will gradually washes away. Cold water. on the other hand, maintains this sticky layer.

Dunno about any ''sticky chemical coating'', but capsaicin (the stuff that makes chillies hot) won't dissolve in water but it does dissolve in alcohol and vegetable oils -- hence the traditional accompaniments of beer (in the UK, at least, but not terribly effective) and (probably everywhere else in the world, and very effective) milk or yoghurt.

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When i was travelling in India many years ago,it was so spicy that i used to buy a bowl of curd to eat with the curry,it worked great!

I visited India just cos i loved their food so much - well there might have been a few other reasons too - but i have to say i was pretty disappointed. Neither spicy nor tasty - perhaps i was just unlucky though.

Well,i have to say that the really spicy food was in the North,when travelling to the South i was surprised,it was rather mild.I have my own Restaurant in LoS,but when i go to BKK i eat ONLY Indian food.I'm a long time vegetarian,and there are plenty of meat-free dishes in Indian cuisine..Even my Thai GF is getting used to curries and roties,and is a common prejudice among Thais that Indian food stinks.

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When i was travelling in India many years ago,it was so spicy that i used to buy a bowl of curd to eat with the curry,it worked great!

I visited India just cos i loved their food so much - well there might have been a few other reasons too - but i have to say i was pretty disappointed. Neither spicy nor tasty - perhaps i was just unlucky though.

A ways back in the '70's a bunch of my mates, also curry fiends, went on a month's tour of India and they too were disappointed.

Truth is the "Indian curry" we have become so enamoured with back in the UK has almost no connection with Indian food much like most of the pizza's and pasta's served in New York having no relation to Italian food, similarly the Chinese food. They are slanted towards the clientelle, distorted by years of cross cultural contamination.

I would guess that most Indian curries served in this part of the world are probably more like the original dishes although again, as they are inevitably served to westerners, toned down.

At a curry house here in HCMC I orderd a lamb vindaloo only to be asked "would you like that spicy sir?". The comment that a vindaloo is what it is went over the head of the waiter.

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Well,i have to say that the really spicy food was in the North,when travelling to the South i was surprised,it was rather mild.

That explains it then. Most of my time was spent in the south.

I have my own Restaurant in LoS,but when i go to BKK i eat ONLY Indian food.I'm a long time vegetarian,and there are plenty of meat-free dishes in Indian cuisine..

Any recommendations? The one that i ate at was at the end of Khao Sarn and i have to say, despite my disappointment in the lack of kick, the food was the best Indian i've had in Thailand.

a common prejudice among Thais that Indian food stinks.

Yeah i don't get that at all. Smells fantastic to my farang nose!

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The spicy hot Thai dishes has raised your tolerance level of chilli.

I trained myself over 30 years ago to take spicy hot food - chewed chilli padi and sipped hot tea.

Hot water helps dissolve the layer of sticky chemical coating your tongue, and the hotness will gradually washes away. Cold water. on the other hand, maintains this sticky layer.

Interesting.

May i ask, what is chilli padi?

Thai calls it 'Prik ka nu', the short green chilli - about 1.5 to 2 cm long excluding the stem.

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a common prejudice among Thais that Indian food stinks.

Yeah i don't get that at all. Smells fantastic to my farang nose!

There are some spices in Indian cuisine that the Thai are either unfamiliar with or do not like. An example is the curry leaf.

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Well,i have to say that the really spicy food was in the North,when travelling to the South i was surprised,it was rather mild.

That explains it then. Most of my time was spent in the south.

I have my own Restaurant in LoS,but when i go to BKK i eat ONLY Indian food.I'm a long time vegetarian,and there are plenty of meat-free dishes in Indian cuisine..

Any recommendations? The one that i ate at was at the end of Khao Sarn and i have to say, despite my disappointment in the lack of kick, the food was the best Indian i've had in Thailand.

a common prejudice among Thais that Indian food stinks.

Yeah i don't get that at all. Smells fantastic to my farang nose!

Rix,i have a strong suspicion that we are going to the same Restaurant.At the end of KSRd,Temple side,on the main Rd there is a small Restaurant who serves Thai food as well.The owner is Indian,the staff is Burmese,kind and polite.They have a Guest House upstairs.Their food is not great,but reasonably good.Lately i stay in BKK 1 or 2 days maximum,so i don't go to far looking for food,but in the past i tried Indian food around Suk. Rd,and i was never disappointed.

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a common prejudice among Thais that Indian food stinks.

Yeah i don't get that at all. Smells fantastic to my farang nose!

There are some spices in Indian cuisine that the Thai are either unfamiliar with or do not like. An example is the curry leaf.

I doubt many Indian dishes contain 'curry leaf', the only trouble I have here when cooking Indian food is finding fenugreek, seeds or leaves.

Spicy Indian dishes in the UK (and I'm guessing elsewhere) actually use chilli powder for the heat as well as or instead of fresh chilli. It's a different kind of 'heat' and seems to combine with the sauce better, perhaps it is this the OP is missing.

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actualy it depends who is ordering it,if farang says spicy they make a note for medium version,if a indian or middle eastern orders it,its a diffrent dish,belive me

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