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English People, Whats The Difference Between An Indian Curry In The Uk And One In Thailand?

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As per title, what makes an English curry different from one in Thailand? I had a lovely vindaloo last week but other than the very nice heat factor can't say it seemed that different (sorry, sacrilege I know, haha).

So, what am I missing? What should I be eating if not a vindaloo in order to get the authentic English curry experience?

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Chicken Vindaloo w/Pila Rice

Bombay Potatoes

Onion Barges

Nan Bread

Popodums w/sauces

Prefer Balti-House style - great flavors.

Also might consider having a good session on lager prior to doing a proper indian.

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English curries are the best in the world - everyone knows that.

Then Indian...

I've never had a good curry in Thailand (or Chinese or salt beef sandwich, but I'm going off track...).

You start with popadoms and mango chutney (very good mango chutney here), and a bottle of Kingfisher. Tiger is acceptable, just, if no Kingfisher is available.

Then you'd need a couple of chapatis and a buttered nan to go with your second Kingfisher.

Next, would be a vindaloo for the tough guys, or a chicken madras / jalfrezi for normal guys - I'm a wimp, as you know, and go for the biriani, with another Kingfisher (see the theme). Best to order an aloo gobi to go with your main course.

Lastly, you need a pistashio kulfi with your final Kindfisher.

Ahhh, fond memories...

(I bet when I get back to England the curries will be crap... :) )

Edited by jasreeve17

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The typical English style Indian Curry from an Indian Restaurant is usually made a certain way that seems hard to replicate for some reason.

First the curry base is made from mainly Onions and some spices, This is used as a base for all the curries that will be made that night.

When a Vindaloo for example is ordered, it is started with the curry base and ingredients are added (tomatoes, spices, herbs), normally a Vindaloo or other very spicy curry is the same recipe as a madras but with an extra teaspoonful of chilli powder.

In the UK most of the Indian restaurants are actually owned by or employ Bengali/Pakistani people.

The most popular curries are;

Chicken Tikka Massala

Chicken Madras

Vindaloo (Phal or Szillat)

Korma

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English curries are the best in the world - everyone knows that.

Then Indian...

I've never had a good curry in Thailand (or Chinese or salt beef sandwich, but I'm going off track...).

You start with popadoms and mango chutney (very good mango chutney here), and a bottle of Kingfisher. Tiger is acceptable, just, if no Kingfisher is available.

Then you'd need a couple of chapatis and a buttered nan to go with your second Kingfisher.

Next, would be a vindaloo for the tough guys, or a chicken madras / jalfrezi for normal guys - I'm a wimp, as you know, and go for the biriani, with another Kingfisher (see the theme). Best to order an aloo gobi to go with your main course.

Lastly, you need a pistashio kulfi with your final Kindfisher.

Ahhh, fond memories...

(I bet when I get back to England the curries will be crap... :) )

Quote: "English curries are the best in the world - everyone knows that."

What is English curry? Perhaps you mean to say "Best curries are found in England"?

IMO, outside of India, the largest selection of curries, and arguably the best curries, can be found in Singapore.

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I was attempting humour; hence the marriage of my first and last lines... :)

And, I have to agree with Brit again - have you been to Southall recently? Are you telling me those folk don't know how to cook a curry???

Edited by jasreeve17

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I was attempting humour; hence the marriage of my first and last lines... :)

And, I have to agree with Brit again - have you been to Southall recently? Are you telling me those folk don't know how to cook a curry???

Or Brick Lane in the old East End of London.

My favourite was:

King prawn Phial (not sure how you spell it - its the hottest they do, so needs some sweet to help it down)

Sag Paneer

Sag Aloo

Bombay Spuds

Vegetable Biriyana (as a rice)

Mushroom Bajee

Vegitable Somosa X 6

Peshwari Nan X 2

Lhasi (spelling again - that lovely yoghurt drink)

Plenty of Kingfisher (beer) on draught

(This was for two of course - except the main and rice - whoever I was with would choose for themselves their own main/rice and share the rest)

Didn't need to eat for 2 days! God, making my tummy rumble.

Also Dosas - stuffed Rotti (all different kinds from thin crispy like gingersnaps to thick bready like peta) filled with savoury potato and vegetable curry. MMmmmmm.

For those in Chiang Mai there is a little place at the end of Soi 2 off of Keaow Nawarat Rd (behind Varee Chiang Mai Kindergarten) - they have a very limited menu and its not too spicy, but a good taste to it.

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And, I have to agree with Brit again - have you been to Southall recently? Are you telling me those folk don't know how to cook a curry???

I seriously doubt most places in the world can compete with the Curry Mile in Oxford either. :)

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I used to work with a lot of Indians for several years - and still have many as friends - their home cooking is far removed from restaurant fare. A lot of it isn't very spicy at all - a lot of it is quite bland actually. They have this cold soup (ice cold) that is a watery chilli stock that hollow dumplings are dipped into - my friends all loved it - was too cold and salty for me, just tasted like sea water! South Indian cooking is spicy, but also often lacking in taste (though can be very hot!). I think the old Bangali Indian restaurant in the UK can't even be topped by its ascendant!

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Quote: "English curries are the best in the world - everyone knows that."

What is English curry? Perhaps you mean to say "Best curries are found in England"?

IMO, outside of India, the largest selection of curries, and arguably the best curries, can be found in Singapore.

Singaporean Indian Curries usually use Star Anise which IMO totally ruins the flavour. British Indian Curries are by far the best

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Stay away from Pakistani restaurants - Indian Sik run restaurants seem to be the best in my experience.

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