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whooliggen

50% Thai & 50% English Schooling.

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A lot of institutions are not concerned so much with what you know initially...they want to see your grades before letting you in.

This is particularly true in Asia, TB. Here it is grades and only grades, to the exclusion of almost everything else. I think very few Asian universities consider the "whole" person.

Bilingual kindergartens were all the rage in Britain, and I believe also in the States and Canada a few years ago, but they rapidly decreased in popularity when it was discovered that except for an increased ability in the target (i.e. second or foreign) language itself, the kids were not as well-developed in other areas as their monolingual peers. Foreign language studies aside, it is fairly well-established that education is more effectively delivered in the students' mother tongue. The only exception to this is perhaps when the child is truly bilingual (i.e. has native fluency in both languages), due to having been raised using the two languages equally.

I think the the solution suggested above may be a better idea. Education in one language for a few years, then switching to the other for the later years, with each parent using their own language with the child at home.

Edited by Rumpole

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Does anyone have any names/addresses of these schools by way of examples?

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I think look kleung (half Thai/half farang) kids have a great opportunity; the opportunity to become fluent in two or more languages and grow up learning about two or more cultures. One of the most important things you can do for your child or children is to make sure they are exposed to an equal amount (if possible) of each language the family can speak fluently. This is often easier said than done and certainly any look kleung growing up in Thailand will be better in Thai than in English (or other languages). However, there are plenty of look kleung who can switch back and forth between languages with ease and who fit in well with both cultures. I know some folks who are farang but speak Thai with their kids...not good in my book. I say give them a chance by speaking to them in your language and let the Thai family members take care of the Thai part. My aunt who lives in Mexico and speaks perfect Spanish has a simple household rule: only English is spoken at home. As a result my half cousins are all bilingual.

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Hi Thaiboxer, a very good point there. My former neighbor at Samkampeng is an American, has a "look kerng" daughter. she is studying at one of the bilingual school in Chiengmai and speak fluent English with Amercan accent. It's definately a +plus to be bilingual.

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