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Isaan Life Is Great


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I think that most of the guys here are here because their wives make them come here. They then go on about how great it is but really would rather be elsewhere but are under the thumb.

If it was as expensive here as say Phuket, no one would be here.

Total rubbish.

My Wife and I were living in Samui when I came up to a Khon Kaen village to visit a friend of mine. I loved it and the life he led. I returned with my Wife a few weeks later and we found some land for sale in the village.

Luckily we managed to sell the house in Samui and started to build a house up here. I stayed alone in a 800 Baht a month room while the house was being built. My Wife stayed in Samui as she was working there and her daughters were at school.

When the house was finished we moved into it. That was two years ago and I have never regreted it. I visited Samui for a few days before Christmas and could not wait to get back home.

I love the life and the people. Not too keen on the morning speakers though.

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I think that most of the guys here are here because their wives make them come here. They then go on about how great it is but really would rather be elsewhere but are under the thumb.

A generalisation, but I think you more or less nailed it with that paragraph.

At last. Geekfreeklover you, as an individual, has hit the nail on the head. I don't actually think their wives/ girlfriends "make" them come to Isaan. They do it on the basis that they're ignorant and rely on their wives / girlfriends to be guiding them in the right direction, due to their lack of knowledge, as to what they're letting themselves in for. Before coming to Thailand they will announce to all, that will listen, as to their future plans that they're moving to Thailand, thinking that everyone is envious of them. Low and behold, all those so called friends will then ridicule them as to the pitfalls that will become them. Ignoring them, they choose to think they've landed in 'Utopia'. After a few months the bubble bursts. Unfortunately they're too embarrased to admit that they've fcuked up, and accept life that's thrown at them in Isaan as being great. The reasoning behind this is because that we have one thing in common with the Thais in that we don't like to lose face.

Please don't take the above as a dig at all, but in general. I think Geekfreeklover to be correct. The reason why I say that is because what I've written is exactly as told to me by a guy that fits the description in my post.

Hi Coventry

I understand you are generalising and I do accept negative things do happen to people coming to Isaan.

Some (& maybe most ) of those people were naive/losers or just plain stupid and that ain't nothing to do with Thailand :o

I see many Ferang/Thai families here, having happy lives that might not be as happy elsewhere. I am a realist without 'rose- tinted glasses' BTW

In the words of Don Henley..... "They call it paradise...... then you can kiss it goodbye."

Dave

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I've nothing agaisnt Isaan or Isaan people. I truly like them. Best people in thailand in my honest opinion. But I fear for the farangs that move here and get isolated. They don't know the language or the culture. There's a guy on another post asking where he can get his hair cut for christ sake !!!

Dave the dude, disagree that all the losers in Isaan were losers in their own country. Most did well in their own country and then become losers as they only listen to what their girlfriends /wives tell them. What their girlfriends and wives tell them often is not to their benefit. And most losers don't realise that they are losers until they lost.

Isaan is great. But don't rely on your other half to tell you how it all works. Jimdee came up with a good metaphor - most farangs are in a wheelchair pushed along by their wives. Meaning that they don't speak the language and take everything their wife tells them as gospal.

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Isaan life can be great, if you just want to go fishing, play golf or drink in expat bars. Apart from that there isn't much to do.

Horses for courses....but I wouldn't limit the appeal of Isaan to the activities you listed as you could have been talking about pattaya or phuket for all I knew. It doesn't matter where you are, any location will either appeal to you or not. The most you will get out of a place is doing stuff locally...if you aren't interested in rural life then why go there? Don't read that to mean the famous words of "Don't like it, then leave", just saying that you have to have an interest in that pace of life and what is done locally. In BKK you might talk about the problems with the MRT or BTS being too crowded...in Isaan the local daily news might be the current rice or cow prices - its all relative to where you are – we are talking pretty basic subculture principles here.

But in saying that, there are those people who jump in with both feet first before getting an idea of whether the life suits them (look at some of the new threads recently). Being accepted by the local community (as much as one can be as a farang) is a big thing, no one wants to live somewhere they are treated as an outcast. To say that Isaan people treat farangs as being lower to them and they enjoy the payback after being treated like that by thais is a bit of a stretch. How you are treated is how you conduct yourself and how you come across....come across as being weak or naive and there will be people there to take advantage of you no matter where you are in this world. There are so many elements in play to decide whether a person has a good experience or not that it’s hard to single out a few and say that’s the reason!! No matter where you are, a foreigner has to walk a tightrope at times and bend to cultural pressures.

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Isaan life can be great, if you just want to go fishing, play golf or drink in expat bars. Apart from that there isn't much to do.

Horses for courses....but I wouldn't limit the appeal of Isaan to the activities you listed as you could have been talking about pattaya or phuket for all I knew. It doesn't matter where you are, any location will either appeal to you or not. The most you will get out of a place is doing stuff locally...if you aren't interested in rural life then why go there? Don't read that to mean the famous words of "Don't like it, then leave", just saying that you have to have an interest in that pace of life and what is done locally. In BKK you might talk about the problems with the MRT or BTS being too crowded...in Isaan the local daily news might be the current rice or cow prices - its all relative to where you are – we are talking pretty basic subculture principles here.

But in saying that, there are those people who jump in with both feet first before getting an idea of whether the life suits them (look at some of the new threads recently). Being accepted by the local community (as much as one can be as a farang) is a big thing, no one wants to live somewhere they are treated as an outcast. To say that Isaan people treat farangs as being lower to them and they enjoy the payback after being treated like that by thais is a bit of a stretch. How you are treated is how you conduct yourself and how you come across....come across as being weak or naive and there will be people there to take advantage of you no matter where you are in this world. There are so many elements in play to decide whether a person has a good experience or not that it's hard to single out a few and say that's the reason!! No matter where you are, a foreigner has to walk a tightrope at times and bend to cultural pressures.

Good post Isee. I agree.

Edited by Geekfreaklover
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Isaan life can be great, if you just want to go fishing, play golf or drink in expat bars. Apart from that there isn't much to do.

Horses for courses....but I wouldn't limit the appeal of Isaan to the activities you listed as you could have been talking about pattaya or phuket for all I knew. It doesn't matter where you are, any location will either appeal to you or not. The most you will get out of a place is doing stuff locally...if you aren't interested in rural life then why go there? Don't read that to mean the famous words of "Don't like it, then leave", just saying that you have to have an interest in that pace of life and what is done locally. In BKK you might talk about the problems with the MRT or BTS being too crowded...in Isaan the local daily news might be the current rice or cow prices - its all relative to where you are – we are talking pretty basic subculture principles here.

But in saying that, there are those people who jump in with both feet first before getting an idea of whether the life suits them (look at some of the new threads recently). Being accepted by the local community (as much as one can be as a farang) is a big thing, no one wants to live somewhere they are treated as an outcast. To say that Isaan people treat farangs as being lower to them and they enjoy the payback after being treated like that by thais is a bit of a stretch. How you are treated is how you conduct yourself and how you come across....come across as being weak or naive and there will be people there to take advantage of you no matter where you are in this world. There are so many elements in play to decide whether a person has a good experience or not that it's hard to single out a few and say that's the reason!! No matter where you are, a foreigner has to walk a tightrope at times and bend to cultural pressures.

Good post Isee. I agree.

Agree! I could not have written it better. 5 star post. :o

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I also love Issan. I was in Khon Kaen village for about 1 week a learnt to ride 3 different kinds of motorbike while i was there. I also got to see the various kinds of farms: rice, sugar and fish farms. I also got to learn to drive a 4 wheeled drive through slow outback roads. I dont think I would live is a village for long time since they dont have reliable internet yet and my work depends on it. I didn't like Khon KAen as much as Udon Thani. I think it's a nicer city with more things closer by.

I dont know what you guys mean by "up north" Chiang Mai?

Udon Thani is fairly north about 1 hours drive from Laos and 1.5 hours drive from Khon Kaen. There are many farang in Udon though. I see them all the time at Big C and the city centre.

My Gfs village is about 80kms away which i haven't visted yet. I did visit another village 30km away from udon where my gf friend lives. I dont think they had seen a farang in quite some time. I had a cold while I was there, my nose was dripping water at a rapid rate and needed some toilet paper. So I rode down the street looking for a shop that sells toilet paper and was open at 10pm. I found a house with an open shop front and they seemed to be having a big get together on the shop floor. They all looked at me as though I'd just stepped off a UFO. As far as they were concerned I was an alien just landed. They all just looked at me as i looked around, located the toilet paper, stepped around people to get it and then go pay for it. It was a whole 8 baht but saved my dignity of having a tap for a nose.

Then off i rode into the darkness again while they were still staring. I slept on the floor of my gf friends house that night with my gf in their 2 bedroom shed. Had a great time learning and seeing how they live out there. Great experience.

I still dont like using the thai toilets and prefer to find a western style one.

Udon Thani in Issan is great and loved riding around on my gf's motorbike everywhere we went. Very friendly people and plenty to do and see. Had more social outings in 3 months than i had the previous 3 years in Australia.

Check out Udon Thani for great location, prices and amenties and farang friendly. I had a new appartment with air con, internet cable TV etc for 4000 baht per month. 500 meters from Big C. Great place to live near my gf's school. Would recommend to anyone wanting to live away from Bangkok.

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some one named Bill had asked a question, 4 to be correct, to which i gave my answer. I now notice his posting as well as my response have been removed??

Am I allowed to ask WHY??

if someone can answer please do so even if by PM.

thanks in advance

RT

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anyone living in khon kaen.it has been 19 years since i have been to isaan and that was to kalison.thats where my exwifes from .coming to khon kaen in july of this year.i have seen some pictures of it ,but i have never been there.can anyone tell me about the 600 acre lake.it looks real clear .any fish there.also what is in khon kaen to do .seems like the future wife has family in mahasarakhom province and roi-et province.soi expect to be traveling a lot to those provinces also.someone talk to this old boy ok .thanks for reading what i have to say.buffaloe

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Isaan life can be great, if you just want to go fishing, play golf or drink in expat bars. Apart from that there isn't much to do.

Horses for courses....but I wouldn't limit the appeal of Isaan to the activities you listed as you could have been talking about pattaya or phuket for all I knew. It doesn't matter where you are, any location will either appeal to you or not. The most you will get out of a place is doing stuff locally...if you aren't interested in rural life then why go there? Don't read that to mean the famous words of "Don't like it, then leave", just saying that you have to have an interest in that pace of life and what is done locally. In BKK you might talk about the problems with the MRT or BTS being too crowded...in Isaan the local daily news might be the current rice or cow prices - its all relative to where you are – we are talking pretty basic subculture principles here.

But in saying that, there are those people who jump in with both feet first before getting an idea of whether the life suits them (look at some of the new threads recently). Being accepted by the local community (as much as one can be as a farang) is a big thing, no one wants to live somewhere they are treated as an outcast. To say that Isaan people treat farangs as being lower to them and they enjoy the payback after being treated like that by thais is a bit of a stretch. How you are treated is how you conduct yourself and how you come across....come across as being weak or naive and there will be people there to take advantage of you no matter where you are in this world. There are so many elements in play to decide whether a person has a good experience or not that it's hard to single out a few and say that's the reason!! No matter where you are, a foreigner has to walk a tightrope at times and bend to cultural pressures.

Good post Isee. I agree.

Agree! I could not have written it better. 5 star post. :o

Well written post, I too agree

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anyone living in khon kaen.it has been 19 years since i have been to isaan and that was to kalison.thats where my exwifes from .coming to khon kaen in july of this year.i have seen some pictures of it ,but i have never been there.can anyone tell me about the 600 acre lake.it looks real clear .any fish there.also what is in khon kaen to do .seems like the future wife has family in mahasarakhom province and roi-et province.soi expect to be traveling a lot to those provinces also.someone talk to this old boy ok .thanks for reading what i have to say.buffaloe

I was just 2 times in Roi-Et, I found the people there very friendly and helpful.

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My fiancee comes from a village just outside Khon Kaen (baht bus 12)

I love the tranquillity of the village, the friendliness, the family life, the food, the swimming in the dam on the farm, the sitting around talking about nothing, watching a bit of television, reading, internet.

If I want shopping for non-essentials, Khon Kaen is 15 minutes away, otherwise great food ingredients from the market or the farm, beer and petrol (by the 500ml) at any number of shops.

Don't need a fitness club - I walk and help on the farm.

Don't need newspapers - can read on net.

for non-home cooked meals, the noodle place near the market or go into KK for barbecue or lash out and go to a restaurant

Lotus Tesco is not far away

Life does not need to be stressful

Villagers brains were disparaged in an earlier post, however, if we had had villagers running the financial markets instead of the "Masters of the Universe" I am sure the Global Finance Crisis would not have eventuated!

sometimes we westerners want too much

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I can't live anywhere for too long, I have a house in the UK but prefer Thailand so I have been living in Bangkok for the last few years, I enjoyed my frequent visits to the wifes village but never stayed too long as i like my comforts such as air conditioning and a real shower (the toilet also but luckilly my parents in law had a western one fitted before our wedding a few years ago so my family wouldn't fall down the hole). The solution was to build a house here as a holiday home and it was finished a couple of weeks ago, I know have a nice retreat here with all western comforts such as air and a real oven and I am very happy, in addition to our truck I just got a second hand dirt bike to tool around on for fun and I am liking it here very much, we are far enough away from the speakers so I can't hear them unless all the doors and windows are open (which they never are).

I love Bangkok and could never live up here in the country for ever, but then I could never live any one place for ever.

Isaan, I like it.

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I can't live anywhere for too long, I have a house in the UK but prefer Thailand so I have been living in Bangkok for the last few years, Isaan, I like it.

Just wondering, ever been to Texas (not the DIY store BTW) :o:D:D

Edited by Dave the Dude
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Villagers brains were disparaged in an earlier post, however, if we had had villagers running the financial markets instead of the "Masters of the Universe" I am sure the Global Finance Crisis would not have eventuated!

The global financial crisis started with irresponsible lending to people without the means to repay, yes this would never happen in a Thai village.

Nowhere is perfect and Isaan is no exception.

I like living in an Isaan village, many of the people are great, many are not.

Overall, I'm happier here than living in a city, but it's far from perfect. But where else would be better? I don't know of anywhere.

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Villagers brains were disparaged in an earlier post, however, if we had had villagers running the financial markets instead of the "Masters of the Universe" I am sure the Global Finance Crisis would not have eventuated!

The global financial crisis started with irresponsible lending to people without the means to repay, yes this would never happen in a Thai village.

Nowhere is perfect and Isaan is no exception.

I like living in an Isaan village, many of the people are great, many are not.

Overall, I'm happier here than living in a city, but it's far from perfect. But where else would be better? I don't know of anywhere.

Agree

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Isaan isn't in itself going to make you happy, just like anywhere else in the world. You have to make compromises, and enjoy what the area has to offer. I talked to an American, spending a couple of days in Mukdahan. He said he was going out of his mind with boredom, and couldn't wait to get back to Pattya, where he was thinking of opening a bar. I told him (not altogether seriously) that Mukdahan was where I went if I wanted some big city lights and action. He was appalled. Good luck to him and his bar in Pattya - I wouldn't change places with him. Thailand offers a huge variety of lifestyles, but it's a fair bet if your woman is from Isaan, that's where you'll finish up!

I'm not a great fan of the spicy Isaan diet, and I find the mix of languages here on the edge of Thailand a disincentive to learn any of them. My wife speaks Lao, Chinese, Thai, and English ... (a typical "uneducated" country girl). I get by on what she calls "body language" most of the time, which can be a lot of fun if the person you're trying to communicate with has any sense of humour at all. Nearly everyone I meet is friendly, but there are exceptions who will "take against you" for no other reason than you're a farang - we have Vietnamese neighbours who I'm sure hold me directly responsible for carpet-bombing their homelands.

The supposed quiet of the area is misleading - Thai rural family life is full of drama, and the Buddhist calendar means spectacular festivals every few days or so (it seems like that sometimes!). I've tried Bangkok, Phuket, and the north, and I can honestly say there's a more relaxed, easier, atmosphere out here, which if you let it will slowly ensnare you.

So far I've had nothing but good-humoured help from the authorities, too. The boys in brown like to flag the Frontier down for a chat sometimes, but they couldn't care less that my international license (helpfully in French) is out of date. Opening a bank account seemed like an impossibility until I followed this forum's advice - keep trying! The bank at the local Tesco's was more than happy to take my money.

As to boredom - if you're prone to it, you'll get bored here as much as anywhere. I found the hectic nightlife of Bangkok insufferably boring after I'd done it to death.

So what's great about Isaan? Where I live, the people (mostly), the river, the atmosphere, the weather, the local life ... but you have to be ready for it, and if opening a bar in Patts sounds like a good idea to you, you're probably not ready for the heart and soul of Thailand!

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njpski,you say you have a pond.any chance i may come over in the future my friend.i am a advid fisherman and thats one thing i would like to do.i will be in thailand the latter of july.give me a buzz.thanks buffaloe

my father in law stocked the dam with fish for me, but the floods after august washed the fish away

I had so much fun, just look at the grin on my face!!!

post-50182-1235643191_thumb.jpg

post-50182-1235643206_thumb.jpg

Edited by njpski
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njpski,you say you have a pond.any chance i may come over in the future my friend.i am a advid fisherman and thats one thing i would like to do.i will be in thailand the latter of july.give me a buzz.thanks buffaloe

my father in law stocked the dam with fish for me, but the floods after august washed the fish away

I had so much fun, just look at the grin on my face!!!

Photos invoke an image of tranquility.

A hammock between a couple of trees and a good book would set it off nicely.

I'd say you're on to a good thing there mate.

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As to boredom - if you're prone to it, you'll get bored here as much as anywhere. I found the hectic nightlife of Bangkok insufferably boring after I'd done it to death.

So what's great about Isaan? Where I live, the people (mostly), the river, the atmosphere, the weather, the local life ... but you have to be ready for it, and if opening a bar in Patts sounds like a good idea to you, you're probably not ready for the heart and soul of Thailand!

A well-balanced post that gives a fair assessment of living in Isaan. Nowhere is perfect and you have to find somewhere that suits YOUR personality and requirements - I agree that I, for one, would not find that by running a bar in Pattaya. Good luck to those who can.

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I can't live anywhere for too long, I have a house in the UK but prefer Thailand so I have been living in Bangkok for the last few years, Isaan, I like it.

Just wondering, ever been to Texas (not the DIY store BTW) :o:D:D

Yeah, my office is in Houston.

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You might find this website useful if you are considering to live in Isaan.

www.isaanthaiproperty.com

Mainly properties in Khon Kaen though

..... and you will be the owner, or web designer ?

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