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seaneee

Farang Interaction

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As some of you might know, I am planning/considering making the move from Pattaya where i have a house to the Rai. I currently live on a farang type housing estate with about 60 houses, although to be fair only about a third of that are ever occupied (except xmas) because the owners are busy in Europe working.

Back on track.............. i currently have a few mates who call aroud for a nice cup of tetley most days, or if not i will call on them. As I plan to buy a house in the sticks i realise farang interaction will be less often.

Ok guys how often do you meet up with other farangs? and do you call around to each others places or just meet in town?

Over to you.

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There are Farang CRAI and CMAI groups... The interaction will not be as much as down ur way due to the numbers. Yet once u make a half a dozen good mates then what the point of having 50 odd. I think most expats in CRAI CMAI- THE north prefer some interaction yet we not into the Pattaya type scene, in general. Most in the north do not enjoy BKK or Pattaya and prefer less touristy places. CRAI a totally different place to pattaya, hope it suits you. Hope u enjoy.

Chok Dee

Jeremy

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I have no farang neighbors to speak of so my interactions are in town, at friends homes, and the occasional gathering at our place. Townies find us a bit off the beaten track, and we have to go to town anyway, so we are more often the visitors than the hosts. Many of us who live in the Rai lean toward being independent and self-reliant so don't usually pursue daily interaction.

The nice thing about knowing more than a half dozen mates is that you bump into people when you go out and can give, and receive, a smile, a hand shake and a friendly word. It works for me. :)

Edited by villagefarang

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Very seldom but at this point in my life I'm fine with that. I knew when I decided to make my move here permanent that I would have far less friends than I do/did have in the UK but my overall quality of life and general happiness more than makes up for it. I know quite a few people here but there are very few I would consider real friends and at the moment I very rarely drink so meeting people for a nights drinking doesn't happen anywhere near as often as it used to.

There are those who feel that if two caucasians see each other while out and about then they should automatically approach each other and become buddies but I'm not convinced, just having the same colour skin isn't a reason in itself to be friends with someone that has a totally different background, personality, attitude, interests, outlook on life etc etc. Would a Thai living in the UK want to be friends with every other Asian living in that area? Would a Korean shopping in Walmart in America approach a Chinese guy and expect them to hit it off?

I remember reading something that said 'Friends often turn out to be just happy memories' which is often the case but having said that I'm not a hermit it's just that I have very little spare time at the moment for friends. Apart from the occasional beer/coffee now and then or dinner with neighbours most of my time is taken up by my three beautiful girls at home (wife, baby and dog) and the 340 kids at the school that I work at but that's just fine and dandy. I hope to be here for many many years to come so I'm sure things will change at some point and if you have a welcome brew once you arrive I'll be there with bells on, I'm a big tetley fan.

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The idea of a broad social network, apparently for some, conjures negative images of I'm not sure what. It is harder to label and discard people with a flippant remark or a disdainful glare if you actually know them. Of course there are those for whom familiarity will breed contempt, but at least your opinion will be based on experience rather than conjecture.

By definition, one only has one best friend. There is no need to dismiss everyone else, however. Some are genuinely busy, or perhaps rude, but I suspect others are simply shy or socially inept, while protecting themselves with an unapproachable veneer.

It takes so little effort to be pleasant and welcoming that I can find no reason not to. That said one usually gets but one chance to make a good impression. ;)

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Hi Seannee, I`ll try and answer you question. In good time you`ll meet loads of people in town and you`ll soon bump into any expats that live around your area

Depending upon your interests and hobbies, you may meet people quicker than you think.Just go with the flow. Don`t throw any welcoming parties for yourself and invite everyone along.

If you like the occasional beer then there are plenty of topics telling you the good social spots in town.Same goes if your a coffee man.

Just let it happen mate.

Welcome to a great place.

Good luck and hope to meet you soon.

Chang35baht.

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To answer your question, altough working in Holland months of the year, i do interact with local farang (by the way mostly Ausies and English) a few lost Germans and some Americans, even Scottish and Irish, thank God not to many dutch.

About 0.43 times per day, on a yearly basis..

Welcome to CR.

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I tend to go to town every 4 or so days at the moment, I'll drop in on a friend and then go and have a chat with anyone who I come across in a Bar or something. Its enough for me, I always seem to be too busy seemingly doing nothing.

Having said that, I have several farang neighbours and I'm sure if I made the effort I could have interaction everyday, or all day. So I suppose its entirely upto you. My interactions do tend towards having a couple of beers unfortunately, and I'm trying to cut down to almost Zero.

Trying to lose that beer gut at the moment so I can get some excercise, I don't like it wobbling around when I run. It just doesn't seem as though it belongs to me. :unsure:

I did sit in a pub for a couple of hours last week and had one Beer, but it didn't feel right, I suppose I was doing some sort of Cold Turkey. Couldn't really get in on the conversations either :whistling:

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i suppose the distances involved would limit the interactions as well. Everyone's probably a bit more spread out than you're used to in Pattaya, specially Jubs, he's almost as spread out as I am :lol:

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There are those who feel that if two caucasians see each other while out and about then they should automatically approach each other and become buddies but I'm not convinced, just having the same colour skin isn't a reason in itself to be friends with someone that has a totally different background, personality, attitude, interests, outlook on life etc etc. Would a Thai living in the UK want to be friends with every other Asian living in that area? Would a Korean shopping in Walmart in America approach a Chinese guy and expect them to hit it off?

I agree to what you say, but I think that you are overdoing it just to make a point. Me myself feel that when I see a falang, I prefer

to be polite and nod or look at the falang and say hey, and mostly just passing him. It feels sad with all these falang just passing looking at the VERY interesting sky, Looking at something at each side of me or just looking down at the floor looking for something. And that something is absolutely not to be polite. Who in hel_l wants to be friend with every guy you meet. That has never been the question. I think that the lack of nodding or greeting eachother is just a sign of lack of manours nothing else.

Glegolo

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i suppose the distances involved would limit the interactions as well. Everyone's probably a bit more spread out than you're used to in Pattaya, specially Jubs, he's almost as spread out as I am :lol:

What are you trying to say Biff :rolleyes:

"spread out" . :unsure:B):o

No, to be honest distances are easy here. I tend to do at least 250kms a week on a motorbike , sometimes 80Kms before breakfast, well before breakfast. I couldn't imagine doing that in the UK.

A lot is to do with making the effort. The weather slows you down a bit.

having said that.

I had a trip up to see Woralak yesterday morning, I was going in that direction anyway,

great Guy, Not laughed so much in ages.

Now he's about 140 kms out of Town, thats a fare distance.

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I agree, Glegolo . Its more difficult to frown and look skywards, but I guess we're all different. There's also that smell under their noses also to contend with I suppose B)

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Im out in the sticks (Chiang Khong) but im looking to move a bit nearer the Rai,i agree with all the comments that have been made so far,we all have different likes/dislikes but i have a suggestion (hope im not out of line),we all know about the Hash Harriers the Expats meetings and all our off the cuff meetings when shopping and having the odd cuppa together,why dont we have a CR TV get together,most likely it would have to be in the Rai so that would mean some of us would have to travel and book an overnighter somewhere,thats fine by me obviously i cant speak for everyone.

It would also mean that someone living in/near the Rai would have to suggest a place to have the event (P UP) (get together),maybe then we would find out if we have anything in common with each other and actually meet face to face,it would be good to know your feelings on this one.

Sorry if this is not the correct way to go about it,feel free to shoot me down in flames if it is.

All The Best

Manny.

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People need to reassess why they came here in the first place. For many it was part of a relationship with a young woman who adored them, so they convinced themselves that that, along with a family who treated them as lord of the manor, plus exquisite rural surroundings was all they needed.

Thankfully I made a couple of false starts when I moved to Asia, I lived in central Vientiane in the Lao PDR, and in Angeles City in the Philippines, both involved a full on social life, I went out EVERY night.

So when I came to Chiang Rai I knew I wasn't going to miss it.

Until guys start looking out at the rice fields and mountains, forget about their libido for a few minutes, and say... "this will drive me nuts in 12 months, if she won't live in Chiang Mai or Bangkok with me she can find someone else"; we will continue to see people throwing parties no one comes to, or driving around on motocys looking for companionship.

Sorry if this is a bit blunt, but saying this sort of thing has helped me get used to living without friends. B)

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There are those who feel that if two caucasians see each other while out and about then they should automatically approach each other and become buddies but I'm not convinced, just having the same colour skin isn't a reason in itself to be friends with someone that has a totally different background, personality, attitude, interests, outlook on life etc etc. Would a Thai living in the UK want to be friends with every other Asian living in that area? Would a Korean shopping in Walmart in America approach a Chinese guy and expect them to hit it off?

I agree to what you say, but I think that you are overdoing it just to make a point. Me myself feel that when I see a falang, I prefer

to be polite and nod or look at the falang and say hey, and mostly just passing him. It feels sad with all these falang just passing looking at the VERY interesting sky, Looking at something at each side of me or just looking down at the floor looking for something. And that something is absolutely not to be polite. Who in hel_l wants to be friend with every guy you meet. That has never been the question. I think that the lack of nodding or greeting eachother is just a sign of lack of manours nothing else.

Glegolo

I used to make more of an effort when I did bump into another foreigner but got fed up of making eye contact only to have them look away or just blatantly look straight through me. I still will say 'morning' or 'afternoon' or 'cute wife', sometimes it gets reciprocated and sometimes it doesn't, no skin off my nose. On the other hand, If I see a Thai looking at me while out at Big C etc and I say hello they will always at least smile and often say something back, I don't always understand what they say but it's better than nothing. I think there's more to it than a lack of manners, VF touched upon it earlier and in previous posts but there's nowt you can do about it.

The OP probably already knows that CR is very different to Pattaya and that there are much less foreigners who live here and that, those who do, often live quite far from each other. I imagine he's just trying to get some reassurance that, once he moves here, he's not going to be a Billy-No-Mates.

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