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Thought For The Day


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Sounds like typical Thai fatalism to me. If we were to paraphrase Buddhist teachings it would come out something like: Whatever is in the past is past, so don't waste time worrying about it. What you

Better Buddha Sakayamuni: "If you want to understand the causes that existed in the past, look at the results as they are manifested in the present. And if you want to understand what results will be

Bump! C'mon Neeranam... where's todays TFTD?

The first entry in my book -

What was the future happens now, what hapens now becomes the past - so why worry?

Now is a gift, that is why it is called the present.

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"Love is, above all, the gift of oneself" - Jean Anouilh. French playwright, 1910-1987

I like this one; it offers some interesting perspectives, when looked at through Buddhist or Christian eyes.

I like it too, but what are the different perspectives it gives you personally?

To me it seems to say something like

Love is something you create - from learning to give (not something that appears out of thin air)

I cannot see other meanings in it though I have tried. Without hijacking the thread, would like to hear your (and anybody else's) perspective too.

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"Love is, above all, the gift of oneself" - Jean Anouilh. French playwright, 1910-1987

I like this one; it offers some interesting perspectives, when looked at through Buddhist or Christian eyes.

I like it too, but what are the different perspectives it gives you personally?

To me it seems to say something like

Love is something you create - from learning to give (not something that appears out of thin air)

I cannot see other meanings in it though I have tried. Without hijacking the thread, would like to hear your (and anybody else's) perspective too.

What I was implying (and I'll probably explain this very badly having just come home from a reception) is that from a Christian view you could say the implication is that the lover gives himself to the loved one, for example God.

From the Buddhist point of view could be interpreted as giving his "self" in order that by being selfless he or she is able to be truly compassionate (to be loving to others).

Its all a bit messed up, and requires a many levelled interpretation of the word love not usually contained in the English word love.

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QUOTE(Thomas_Merton @ 2005-07-14 11:20:44)

"Love is, above all, the gift of oneself" - Jean Anouilh. French playwright, 1910-1987

I like this one; it offers some interesting perspectives, when looked at through Buddhist or Christian eyes.

The first thing I see in this quote is that I should give more of my time to my family, not be at work all the time and just giving them money, but give myself physically.

Another thing I see is, I must offer myself without any reservation toward my concept of God.

Another is, I must get rid of self-centredness, the root of my "suffering" and which causes all kinds of fears.

Another is that love IS ABOVE ALL.

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