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richard10365

Z = Zeht V = Wha

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Some of my friends here in Thailand have asked me to help them with their english speaking skills. Being the good neighbor that I am and while drinking my favorite brew (Chang), we set out on our journey of discovery.

Certian things about translating Thai to English and English to Thai raised some questions.

1. Which farang country teaches z = zeht?

2. Does the letter "v" sound more like ฟ (fah fan) or ว (wha whan)?

Thanks for your help.

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Some of my friends here in Thailand have asked me to help them with their english speaking skills. Being the good neighbor that I am and while drinking my favorite brew (Chang), we set out on our journey of discovery.

Certian things about translating Thai to English and English to Thai raised some questions.

1.  Which farang country teaches z = zeht?

2.  Does the letter "v" sound more like  ฟ (fah fan) or ว (wha whan)?

Thanks for your help.

You don't know how to pronounce the letter 'v'? Usually it is pronounced like the letter 'f' but while humming simultaneously and a bit softer.

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1.  Which farang country teaches z = zeht?

2.  Does the letter "v" sound more like  ฟ (fah fan) or ว (wha whan)?

1. I'm not sure where you come from but in the UK we pronounce z as zed and in the US it's zee Thais say set or sat.

2. If you have to choose between the two definately ฟ

Both your posts indicate the problem that Thais have when leaning English and trying to mentally transliterate everything into Thai script. If you understand Thai script at all you will realise that it should never be used when teaching English, unfortunately it is (I've seen alphabet posters that transliterate the letter v as วี wee).

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An Australian teacher told me that the name of the letter 'h' is pronounced back home, down under, as 'haitch,' whereas in the USA, there's no initial breathing sound and the name is 'aitch.'

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We'd (the non commoners) would say haitch in the UK. And usually us a with it (a hotel as opposed to an 'otel :o ).

a habitual, an abitual :D

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I've noticed that back home I always used to pronounce h 'aitch' whereas now when I teach and am spelling a word for students I often say 'haitch'. Not sure when that happened.

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I've noticed that back home I always used to pronounce h 'aitch' whereas now when I teach and am spelling a word for students I often say 'haitch'. Not sure when that happened.

:D

Sorry, as a yank can't resist the urge to rag on a Brit.

If you follow the shed-u-all , how do you educate your children?

Do you send them to a shoe-all?

If not, why is it a shed-u-all, and not a shoe-all?

Only in fun, guys.

:o

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I've noticed that back home I always used to pronounce h 'aitch' whereas now when I teach and am spelling a word for students I often say 'haitch'. Not sure when that happened.

:D

Sorry, as a yank can't resist the urge to rag on a Brit.

If you follow the shed-u-all , how do you educate your children?

Do you send them to a shoe-all?

If not, why is it a shed-u-all, and not a shoe-all?

Only in fun, guys.

:o

I don't understand why you're dropping the c sound from all of these words mate.

I'd (as a Brit) say sked-u-all, not shed-u-all. Might be a North/South thing, y'all.

But then I could care less, or couldn't I?

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An Australian teacher told me that the name of the letter 'h' is pronounced back home, down under, as 'haitch,' whereas in the USA, there's no initial breathing sound and the name is 'aitch.'

I always thought that it was a religious thing.

years ago we used to know if someone in Glasgow was a Prodestant or a Catholic by the way they said 'h'. Catholics said 'haitch'.

I am British and I always say "skedual" for schedule.

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...I am British and I always say "skedual" for schedule.

I'm not British, I'm English :o. And I always say "Aitch" and "Shedule".

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I have noticed that Thai people have a hard time saying "H" but don't have a problems saying the number "8".

I tell them to say the number "8" and put the ช sound behind it.

It usually fixes their pronounciation. :o

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