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Went to a Vietnamese restaurant with the family here in the US, they had Pho. I had Bun. the Bun was pretty good but the Pho just seemed to be noodle soup without the chilis or peanuts. Maybe I've been in thailand too long, but I need some spice with my noodles and with my rice.

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Most viet restaurants do have chlli paste for the asking.

I agree with you sbk, after having been spoiled by Thai seasonings, nothing else on earth would be able to replace its tenaciousness.

My family used to hoard gallons of dry PRIG KEE NOO from BungKaPe each year after visiting family members scattered around Thailand.

Those truly was, that was the year that was!

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Pho bo here in HCM is served with slices of lemon, a bowl of chopped chillis, bean sprouts, various leaves and brown & red spicy pastes. You add as much or little as you like to make the fire you desire.

But yes, without those condiments it is just noodle soup but only the same as the Thai stuff without the add ins.

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The chilis are served on the side, you put them in the soup as you like. If they were missing, that's weird and bad, have never seen that even once in years of eating pho in the US. Those chilis will really fire up the soup. Also on the table should be Srirachi chili sauce, which is used to dip things in, not to throw in the soup. Bun in the US can be excellent in Vietnamese areas. Much better than in Thailand. Peanuts and pho, no. Peanuts in bun, yes.

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It was there, but nobody added it to their Pho, so I didn't realize it was supposed to go in. I didn't have the Pho however so I wasn't going to add seasoning to my dining companions food :D

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The chilis are served on the side, you put them in the soup as you like. If they were missing, that's weird and bad, have never seen that even once in years of eating pho in the US. Those chilis will really fire up the soup. Also on the table should be Srirachi chili sauce, which is used to dip things in, not to throw in the soup. Bun in the US can be excellent in Vietnamese areas. Much better than in Thailand. Peanuts and pho, no. Peanuts in bun, yes.

Well we may not be talking about the same condiments but the Vietnamese here most definately add the sauces to the soup. Why would they be provided in a cafe that only served pho bo?

Peanuts, no. With dishes like bun thit heo xao you do get a sprinkling of peanuts plus a dipping sauce that I must admit I pour over the dish being a heathen, and a lazy one at that.

Vietnamese food, as served, is generally not spicy but you have a range of bits to add to suit your taste.

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You guys, it is only 4 in the afternoon.

All your exposition on Viet cuisines really make my mouth water even more. :lol:

We used to pay about 12 USD for a bowl of pho in San Francisco bay area, but now in Thailand, it is an entirely different way of life. I just love Thailand. :D

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In the US at Vietnamese restaurants, there is almost always hoisin sauce and Sriracha in bottles on the table. The typical way to eat the pho is to put in all the leaves, bean sprouts, and fresh chili into the soup and squeeze some lime on it, and stir it all around. The hoisin sauce and Sriracha sauce are typically poured into small side dishes where you dip the meats in, if you like (and I do like, a lot). My only experience with pho in Vietnam was two times in Hanoi and I wasn't served the hoisin sauce and Sriracha (also no bean sprouts). Generally the style in the USA is more south Vietnamese though for obvious reasons. Of course you could pour the hoisin sauce and Sriracha sauce into the broth, whatever you like, but I think that would be a shame as good pho broth is such a clean rich taste, that would muddy it up.

post-37101-090945000 1282385940_thumb.jp

Edited by Jingthing
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I mostly prefer Vietnamese cuisine to Thai, but like Thai noodle soup better than Vietnamese. However, when I was visiting Vietnam a lot, that had just discovered instant noodle and it was hard to get soup with home made one. So many people seem to like Pho, that I have always wondered if the instant noodles were the real problem.

What is 'bun" by the way?

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Bun! So good.

For example, a bowl of cool dry rice vermicilli topped with a bunch of stuff (for example vegetables, roasted chicken, roast pork, Viet eggrolls), served with a bowl of fish sauce on the sauce. I always mix in the sriracha and hoisin in the bowl (but generally in Thailand they don't offer the hoisin).

post-37101-068243000 1282803037_thumb.jp

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  • 2 weeks later...

Bun! So good.

For example, a bowl of cool dry rice vermicilli topped with a bunch of stuff (for example vegetables, roasted chicken, roast pork, Viet eggrolls), served with a bowl of fish sauce on the sauce. I always mix in the sriracha and hoisin in the bowl (but generally in Thailand they don't offer the hoisin).

post-37101-068243000 1282803037_thumb.jp

Where can I get Bun in Bangkok??????

When I'm in Pattaya there is a place in Central that does it great for 79 baht. I have tried many Vietnamese restaurants in Bangkok, but they never have it. Went all the way to Ari last week to try a place I heard of, they had some wierded up version with not enough noodles.....

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Bun! So good.

For example, a bowl of cool dry rice vermicilli topped with a bunch of stuff (for example vegetables, roasted chicken, roast pork, Viet eggrolls), served with a bowl of fish sauce on the sauce. I always mix in the sriracha and hoisin in the bowl (but generally in Thailand they don't offer the hoisin).

post-37101-068243000 1282803037_thumb.jp

Where can I get Bun in Bangkok??????

When I'm in Pattaya there is a place in Central that does it great for 79 baht. I have tried many Vietnamese restaurants in Bangkok, but they never have it. Went all the way to Ari last week to try a place I heard of, they had some wierded up version with not enough noodles.....

You're right, the bun at that place in Pattaya is quite decent. I have also never seen bun in a bowl in Bangkok, but I reckon some places have it, it's a big city. In the US, most all Vietnamese places have it, but not in Thailand. There is another kind of dish that I think may also be considered bun. That is a main plate with some kind of savory food such as shrimp on a sugar can stick served with leaves and also some cooked rice noodle on the side. If you can't get the bowl in Bangkok I am sure some places have that other kind of bun dish. If I am wrong that is also considered bun, someone will correct me, but I also associate mainly the bun bowls with bun.
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In the US at Vietnamese restaurants, there is almost always hoisin sauce and Sriracha in bottles on the table. The typical way to eat the pho is to put in all the leaves, bean sprouts, and fresh chili into the soup and squeeze some lime on it, and stir it all around. The hoisin sauce and Sriracha sauce are typically poured into small side dishes where you dip the meats in, if you like (and I do like, a lot). My only experience with pho in Vietnam was two times in Hanoi and I wasn't served the hoisin sauce and Sriracha (also no bean sprouts). Generally the style in the USA is more south Vietnamese though for obvious reasons. Of course you could pour the hoisin sauce and Sriracha sauce into the broth, whatever you like, but I think that would be a shame as good pho broth is such a clean rich taste, that would muddy it up.

post-37101-090945000 1282385940_thumb.jp

My missus is Vietnamese. She only puts chili sauce in the pho when there is no fresh chili. The fresh chili is preferred becuse it doesn't 'muddy up' the broth.

I've never had leaves and bean sprouts in pho, only in bun.

Edited by PattayaParent
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4 years ago when I lived in HCM on Mac Dinh Chi St in district 1 there were 4-5 places across the street that offered pho bo; just varied by price from 15-18k dong with all the leaves, condiments, etc...recently I've been in the north with no places close by my accommodation in Hanoi but offered at the breakfast buffet at the hotel in Ha Tinh but with no condiments, just some chiles and bean sprouts...they useta bring the cauldron of broth up on the lift from the downstairs kitchen and make a mess...good broth and noodles but no condiments...

raises the question: are the leaves and condiments a southern thing?

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In the US at Vietnamese restaurants, there is almost always hoisin sauce and Sriracha in bottles on the table. The typical way to eat the pho is to put in all the leaves, bean sprouts, and fresh chili into the soup and squeeze some lime on it, and stir it all around. The hoisin sauce and Sriracha sauce are typically poured into small side dishes where you dip the meats in, if you like (and I do like, a lot). My only experience with pho in Vietnam was two times in Hanoi and I wasn't served the hoisin sauce and Sriracha (also no bean sprouts). Generally the style in the USA is more south Vietnamese though for obvious reasons. Of course you could pour the hoisin sauce and Sriracha sauce into the broth, whatever you like, but I think that would be a shame as good pho broth is such a clean rich taste, that would muddy it up.

post-37101-090945000 1282385940_thumb.jp

I ate Pho regularly for 10 years in Viet restaurants in the USA before coming to Thailand, and rather like the way you can taste the various ingredients without being overshadowed by the hot-spiciness of chilies.

I really miss the hoisin sauce, and would probably use it here when I make Thai noodle dishes. Know if it can be bought here? Anyone know the Thai name?

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  • 2 months later...

For me, the best hoisin sauce is the Koon Chun brand. The best Sriracha sauce is the Vietnamese version (which is a modified version of the Thai one)from the Huy Fong Rooster brand. I usually put it in my soup even though it gets cloudy, because I like the taste.

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4 years ago when I lived in HCM on Mac Dinh Chi St in district 1 there were 4-5 places across the street that offered pho bo; just varied by price from 15-18k dong with all the leaves, condiments, etc...recently I've been in the north with no places close by my accommodation in Hanoi but offered at the breakfast buffet at the hotel in Ha Tinh but with no condiments, just some chiles and bean sprouts...they useta bring the cauldron of broth up on the lift from the downstairs kitchen and make a mess...good broth and noodles but no condiments...

raises the question: are the leaves and condiments a southern thing?

Must be for the pho at least, when I eat bun cha in the North there's loads of condiments so they are available and could be used in the pho, but aren't.

The North VN are very 'snobbish' about their pho though, they reckon the southerners can't make it properly.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Bun! So good.

For example, a bowl of cool dry rice vermicilli topped with a bunch of stuff (for example vegetables, roasted chicken, roast pork, Viet eggrolls), served with a bowl of fish sauce on the sauce. I always mix in the sriracha and hoisin in the bowl (but generally in Thailand they don't offer the hoisin).

post-37101-068243000 1282803037_thumb.jp

Where can I get Bun in Bangkok??????

When I'm in Pattaya there is a place in Central that does it great for 79 baht. I have tried many Vietnamese restaurants in Bangkok, but they never have it. Went all the way to Ari last week to try a place I heard of, they had some wierded up version with not enough noodles.....

The Vietnamese place in Food Loft on top of Central Childlom has Bun.

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I had sample couple of pho in several street stalls in Hanoi. IMO, the pho they serve in north definitely lacking "flavor", I am more used of Singapore/ Indonesian noodle soup. There is one place in Hanoi that serves a really GOOD pho bo actually (not lacking flavor at all), Pho Ly Quoc Su. I swear that is the best pho I've ever had, I will come back to Hanoi just to eat that. I season the pho with lime and nuoc mam and chilli. I see the locals do that.

The pho ga on the other hand are really bland, I never had a good pho ga.

There's also another dish called bun moc, which is rice vermicelli served with pig intestines, congealed blood, I had it at Bao Khanh in Hanoi and it tasted really great as well.

i've never been to any other city in VN other than Hanoi so I can't say how the mid-south vietnamese food taste compared to Thai.

I've given up eating Vietnamese restaurant outside Vietnam, they don't deliver

Edited by Ducklover
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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...
  • 2 months later...

Really glad to see u discuss abt our foods. I wish i could take my mom to Bangkok to sell u whatever u want with the vietnamese foods, lol. She's really so good with it.

BTW, it's not that simple is "Bun", "Bún" is only the name of 1 resource in your meal, not the whole. Many different ways and many different names for what can go with "Bún". Expample for the "Bun" that JingThing posted within the picture, it comes with roast meat, peatnuts, some vegetables and the exactly name must be "Bún thịt nướng", and the "thit nuong" is roast meat meaning. And go on, u still have bun nem nuong, bun cha, bun bo, bun ngang etc.

So you must know correct name to ask Vietnamese which one u'd like. I can show u that correct name if u show me correctly what u eat :P

I'm new in Bangkok, then hope i can find where they have it too. I'm Vietnamese then =P

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4 years ago when I lived in HCM on Mac Dinh Chi St in district 1 there were 4-5 places across the street that offered pho bo; just varied by price from 15-18k dong with all the leaves, condiments, etc...recently I've been in the north with no places close by my accommodation in Hanoi but offered at the breakfast buffet at the hotel in Ha Tinh but with no condiments, just some chiles and bean sprouts...they useta bring the cauldron of broth up on the lift from the downstairs kitchen and make a mess...good broth and noodles but no condiments...

raises the question: are the leaves and condiments a southern thing?

Must be for the pho at least, when I eat bun cha in the North there's loads of condiments so they are available and could be used in the pho, but aren't.

The North VN are very 'snobbish' about their pho though, they reckon the southerners can't make it properly.

yahs...in 1975 the northerner grimly sez to the southern vanquished: ' you eat shit you collaborating dog and shall attend harsh re-education camp, and there shall be no more pho bo for you!...'...

I been here a year an' try to stay out of it...make do wid loaves of bread by de side ob de road...('put sum mustard on that, will ye?...':()

PP, aint sayin nothing about you were sayin'...with respect to the politburo they's got to be improvements in education and health care subsidies around here.. the rural poverty is still terrible :(

Edited by tutsiwarrior
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  • 1 month later...

now I geddit...there is a difference between pho and bun...just like wid asians, noodles all look de same....and with this racist misconception there has got to be a story...

a western colleague is leaving the project after a year on the job and it's also his birthday and splashes out with a big do for his mates at a posh hotel somewhere in Quang Binh province...it was a 'poolside party' so ye knew there were gonna be a lot of drunken 'water sports'...

to the host who is a mate I said lets include a couple of the management girls from the hotel where I live who he knows and he said why not?...they are lovely girls...and I went together with them to the do with them modestly but tastefully attired and me in Thailand clown shorts and t-shirt to find the other westerners similarly attired...uh oh...

there was a magnificent seafood and steak buffet but did people bother?,no...it was western big time misbehaving being hurled into the pool; a VN secretary was hurled into the pool attired in her black sheath cocktail dress then changed into cutoffs and a halter and did a lewd dance in order to get hurled into the pool again...asian girlfriends of various nationalities lounged about in bikinis begging to be hurled...it was western bacchanalia en masse and I cast a protective eye on my modest VN charges but they had fled into the hotel somewhere...

when they re-appeared it was late and I said 'time to go?' as we had an hour drive back to our hotel the next province over...I had foraged some leftovers from the buffet to give an to eccentric colleague back at our hotel who doesn't spend money but makes do with scraps from the hotel restaurant and one of my girls faced me ferociously and said 'I'll have that scrap leg of lamb...' and I knew something was amiss as vietnamese don't eat mutton...

the driver floored it out of the hotel parking lot and soon we were on the main highway heading north and then the car stopped in front of a crummy looking open restaurant and one of the girls growled: 'we're hungry' and I whimpered:' please, do they have ice for my vodka...?' then magnificent bowls of noodles appeared of a like that I had never seen before, vermicelli type rice noodles with condiments and although I was stuffed to the gizzards with steak and lobster I dug in...the vodka neglected on the side...

then I said that is remarkable: what is it called?...the girls were on home ground and sate after the noodles and indicated 'bun' on the sign board out side...and I thought: that's what sbk was on about in the thaivisa thread...

we slumbered in the car on the way back to the beach hotel...I had lost respect but had gained new knowledge....:)

win a few, lose a few... B)

Edited by tutsiwarrior
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as an observation, it is rice harvest time in our part of VN and as we were driving south to the party I tried to engage one of the girls regarding the timing of the harvest as it is a month earlier than the previous year in July when all the activity started...(ye get to notice these things when living in a rural area; everyone's involved, sorta like something out of a Breuegel painting)

she is a local provincial girl but college educated and she was abrupt with me to say that her family is not concerned with such matters...

but she rejected western cuisine and western convivality at the party in favor of a simple peasant noodle dish?...she was also confused when I said that I admired Ho Chi Minh...

dey gots ye comin' an' goin' ....:blink:

Edited by tutsiwarrior
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  • 3 months later...

Is there a CHEAP AUTHENTIC PHO resturant in ThailandÉ Could never find a place! Wanna pay 40bt for a bowl of pho! Had pho in Cambodia for $1 USD. Very authentic. Just cant seem to find a reasonable priced AUTHENTIC tasting Pho in Thailand!

The best I've found was in Laos. Saying that every pho I've had in Thailand (BKK, CMX ) was basically a Kuaytiaw. No where in Thai have I found a nice pho.

I just don't think Thais are into AUTHENTIC viet food.

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