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JurgenG

How To Fit-In In The Village

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Kuhn B at #88: It has only taken 17 years for someone who speaks in generalisations to tell me I was wrong and stupid.

Ah yes and maybe he has hit upon the true value of ThaiVisa.com: I have come on this website and -- while many have expressed appreciation for my assistance -- I have also been called a moron, an idiot, a despicable person, someone with his 'head in the sand' and 'mind in the gutter', Spazzbo, etc. which gives me good reason to maintain a lifestyle wherein I have limited if not zero interaction with farangs on any daily basis ...

The ones on TV with whom I may have some simpatico are not in the region ... and I just presume that the farang locals I might meet are in the former category ... and I much prefer the company of Thais who speak no English.

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Ahhh yes jazzbo, a good plan indeed. Just be careful though because remember ALL Thai people are out to rip off ALL foreigners in ALL villages around Thailand. :lol:

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As long as they ALL try to rip me off after removing their panties I will take my chances.

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Sinbin

You ask why so many Psycho-analysts on TV simple, there are plenty of patients.

Jazzbo

At first my opinion of your posts wasn't good, as you know. But my opinoin has changed over time to realise that most of what you say is informative and witty. The acid is dished out to the ones who usually deserve it

Have a good Christmas

Bob

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Personally I love it in the village, the peace and quiet, my girls love it there too.

Yes people have sometimes asked to 'loan' money but no-one has taken offense if we couldn't.

I would feel disrespectful if I didn't wai to the appropriate people.

Anyone else in the kantararom area?

Edited by Lesley99

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Kuhn B at #88: It has only taken 17 years for someone who speaks in generalisations to tell me I was wrong and stupid.

Ah yes and maybe he has hit upon the true value of ThaiVisa.com: I have come on this website and -- while many have expressed appreciation for my assistance -- I have also been called a moron, an idiot, a despicable person, someone with his 'head in the sand' and 'mind in the gutter', Spazzbo, etc. which gives me good reason to maintain a lifestyle wherein I have limited if not zero interaction with farangs on any daily basis ...

The ones on TV with whom I may have some simpatico are not in the region ... and I just presume that the farang locals I might meet are in the former category ... and I much prefer the company of Thais who speak no English.

Well up in my village I am the only full time farang, my mate comes over from Denmark a couple of times a year and there is an Aussie who is back and forth as he works offshore a lot of the time.

Near the big village is a French guy who speaks very little English and a Dutch guy who is a good friend.

There is a Scots guy I know fairly well but he is about 60 km away by road.

I like my own company most of the time but now and then I get the urge to speak English with someone other than my wife and a couple of Thai friends but apart from that I live in a small village so I speak with Thais most of the time.

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Kuhn GB -- As you can maybe tell from my profile I spend so much of time assisting persons in Thailand who are disabled that I am often asked if I am a missionary; if that were all I would find myself a bit sickening ... 'jazzbo' is a bit of my evil-twin to knock down that image.

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Kuhn GB -- As you can maybe tell from my profile I spend so much of time assisting persons in Thailand who are disabled that I am often asked if I am a missionary; if that were all I would find myself a bit sickening ... 'jazzbo' is a bit of my evil-twin to knock down that image.

I am sure that he is succeeding. ;)

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i am not a full time resident of my wifes village, but have quite a bit of time there over various trips.

people are in the main friendly and show a decent level of respect, it does differ depending on the westerner and his attitudes, me i only have positive interactions, most in the village refer to me by name, but have witnessed them being rude/disrespectful to other westerners, perhaps this is due to their partners actions/reputations.

my tips for fitting in as a casual visitor

1. never been seen as a drunk or an idiot

2. dont get involved in other farangs problems

3. be able to keep a secret (just sit and smile, you know the truth but dont give the game away)

4. participate in village sports days or agricultural events

5. do local things like pick up the nephews and nieces after school, dont be afraid to give a talk at the schools your wife's family members or old uni friends work at, the kids just smile anyway.

6. frequent the local businesses and pay the correct price

7. if someone is doing work on your vehicle or land/house watch closely what they do, it shows you expect a good job to be done.

8. never lend money

9.learn who is who in the village

10 learn a workable level of the local dialect

11.mix with local doctors/professionals/government officials, not the local drunks

12. keep one bottle of lao khao, so older relatives/respected older villagers may have a glass when visiting.

13. never provide alcohol for the local drunks

14 discourage the westerner and his village guide he met while she was plying her horizontal profession, from trying to visit.

15. if your wife's family is well respected, maintain that level of respect with your behaviour.

16.learn the local customs, for government/temple events.

17. realise you will never be a local, but they will realise your values and expectations.

just some of my tips

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I was quite keen to try and pull a longish 2nd post from a newbie to pieces.

However, I think many of the points are extremely valid and whilst there be a slight snobbishness, about some of the tone, it is a good benchmark for someone who wants to be a serious participant in village life.

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I was quite keen to try and pull a longish 2nd post from a newbie to pieces.

However, I think many of the points are extremely valid and whilst there be a slight snobbishness, about some of the tone, it is a good benchmark for someone who wants to be a serious participant in village life.

sorry it sounded a bit snobby, i agree with your comment, but i hate having to hear lies being told to other westerners, or thai-glish being spoken, westerners i have not met before, i usually manage to run into them at the local shop and interact with them there.

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I was quite keen to try and pull a longish 2nd post from a newbie to pieces.

However, I think many of the points are extremely valid and whilst there be a slight snobbishness, about some of the tone, it is a good benchmark for someone who wants to be a serious participant in village life.

sorry it sounded a bit snobby, i agree with your comment, but i hate having to hear lies being told to other westerners, or thai-glish being spoken, westerners i have not met before, i usually manage to run into them at the local shop and interact with them there.

I think everyone is here for different reasons and from different start points.

I live in a rural town rather than the village but after 5 years (now staying 9 months per year) I have not had the time/skill/inclination/encouragement/desire to learn Thai. This is a distinct disadvantage in progressing to the stage where you are at.

With a few exceptions, at either end of the spectrum, there is enough room for harmony amongst the Falangs of different origin/social status/linguistic ability/culture commitment etc. I think it is a case of showing respect to ALL people you come across and treat them as you wish to be treated yourself. Tam dee, dai dee is not exclusive to the Thais.

Everyone is different and some people go 'stir crazy' after a few days out of Pattaya or Bangkok - even the those happily resident in a village sometimes need to 'get out of the jungle' to maintain a perspective on life.

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I was quite keen to try and pull a longish 2nd post from a newbie to pieces.

However, I think many of the points are extremely valid and whilst there be a slight snobbishness, about some of the tone, it is a good benchmark for someone who wants to be a serious participant in village life.

sorry it sounded a bit snobby, i agree with your comment, but i hate having to hear lies being told to other westerners, or thai-glish being spoken, westerners i have not met before, i usually manage to run into them at the local shop and interact with them there.

I think everyone is here for different reasons and from different start points.

I live in a rural town rather than the village but after 5 years (now staying 9 months per year) I have not had the time/skill/inclination/encouragement/desire to learn Thai. This is a distinct disadvantage in progressing to the stage where you are at.

With a few exceptions, at either end of the spectrum, there is enough room for harmony amongst the Falangs of different origin/social status/linguistic ability/culture commitment etc. I think it is a case of showing respect to ALL people you come across and treat them as you wish to be treated yourself. Tam dee, dai dee is not exclusive to the Thais.

Everyone is different and some people go 'stir crazy' after a few days out of Pattaya or Bangkok - even the those happily resident in a village sometimes need to 'get out of the jungle' to maintain a perspective on life.

How right you are.

+1 :)

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a trait/skill i have is, i tend to analyse people, my working life has been mainly involved with drug addicts, drunks and the mentally ill, with a client base mainly from the lower strata of society, they differ little from their esarn counterparts, the major difference there not being a social welfare system to support them.

lies and deceit are the rules of most of my client group, when in thailand, i see so much of this in the tourist areas of phuket and bkk, i have never been to pattaya so cannot comment upon that city, that i am disturbed by it, that the only haven appears to be a village where for the most, people maintain a fairly predictable front, liars in the village are generally caught out, and most people's secrets remain concealed.

my wife does not mix with prostitutes or ex-prostitutes, it is not snobbery, it is, she lacks things in common with them, for me i am usually happy to talk with them and their partners, and have met some great people, but i talk to them at neutral venues or their own houses.

hopefully this post explains, some background to the way i post.

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quote name='macksview' timestamp='1292599422' post='4094089']

a trait/skill i have is, i tend to analyse people, my working life has been mainly involved with drug addicts, drunks and the mentally ill, with a client base mainly from the lower strata of society, they differ little from their esarn counterparts, the major difference there not being a social welfare system to support them.

lies and deceit are the rules of most of my client group, when in thailand, i see so much of this in the tourist areas of phuket and bkk, i have never been to pattaya so cannot comment upon that city, that i am disturbed by it, that the only haven appears to be a village where for the most, people maintain a fairly predictable front, liars in the village are generally caught out, and most people's secrets remain concealed.

my wife does not mix with prostitutes or ex-prostitutes, it is not snobbery, it is, she lacks things in common with them, for me i am usually happy to talk with them and their partners, and have met some great people, but i talk to them at neutral venues or their own houses.

hopefully this post explains, some background to the way i post.

quote

YES IT CERTAINLY DOES.

I think you should read One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest

then consult a professional Analyst

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