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IsaanAussie

Pigs 101 (A Start)

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hi,

I'm new for farm forums and would like to know about pig farm and fish farm how should i start with by the way i am Thai try to write English i apology i'm in uk thinking about start someting to do when i go back thailand next time

Start here FIRST:

Tips for Farming Forum Newbies

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hi,

I'm new for farm forums and would like to know about pig farm and fish farm how should i start with by the way i am Thai try to write English i apology i'm in uk thinking about start someting to do when i go back thailand next time

Hello sawudon and welcome.

I am not one of the most experienced pig farmers on this forum but if you are thinking of starting a pig/fish farm then you will need a building for your pigs, some pigs, a pond and some fish 55555 !!!!

Joking aside,you will need good breeding/fattening stock,a good supply of clean drinking water (cold),clean habitat for you pigs and good medical care.Pigs are easy to raise but to have successful pigs making good weight or litters is another matter all together.Hope this helps and good luck !!!

Shaggy

P.s don't worry about your English writing,it's a lot better than my Thai writing :rolleyes:

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SUBJECT - Parasites, BIOSECURITY, Organic Pigs and Pork

With the onset of the wet season and the increase in parasite load, I have had to rethink my operation in terms of protecting my breeding herd. To date I have tried to stay away from regular vaccine usage in general. In the case of parasites I have used in feed wormers for the internals and repellant sprays for the externals. That has been effective in the past but of late my breedings sows have had some serious infestations externally. Combined with the weather a few of the resulting wounds have quickly lead to nasty infections which have required countless hours of care to heal. The worst effected were two sows about to farrow.

I have decided to start using injectable Ivermectin across the herd. If anyone has an alternative I would like to hear about it.

I have attached a copy of a FAO Biosecurity document for pig famers which I think is a good start for those in the industry. It is written for operations in regions such as Thailand so looks at issues like sticky nose neighbours, sorry, cultural issues.

BIOSECURITY for pigs FAO.pdf

I am looking into organic certification for my pig operation. As yet I have not found Thai standards for this so if anyone has some I would welcome a copy. What I am particularly interested in is the requirements for drug usage. In other parts of the world vaccines and preventative treatments are allowed as long as withdrawal periods are obeyed. Also there are dividing lines which allow organic pork to be grown from non-organic breeding stock, note I said pork not pigs. There are a lot of grey areas here and I for one would appreciate any input from those that have factual experience/information on the subject here in Thailand.

Isaan Aussie

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Any idea about the actual farmgate prices ?

This one (http://ptg.igetweb.com/index.php?mo=3&art=494930) says that prices have been update on June 4th...this is in the future ???

Furthermore, the last entry is dated May 17th, so it's considered outdated.

This CP site (http://www.cpffeed.com/price_detail.html?product=1) hasn't been updated since February, so it's useless.

I tried the google search but the results returned are outdated as well. Some sites even show prices dated back to 2009.

Any help ?

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Any idea about the actual farmgate prices ?

This one (http://ptg.igetweb.c...mo=3&art=494930) says that prices have been update on June 4th...this is in the future ???

Furthermore, the last entry is dated May 17th, so it's considered outdated.

This CP site (http://www.cpffeed.c....html?product=1) hasn't been updated since February, so it's useless.

I tried the google search but the results returned are outdated as well. Some sites even show prices dated back to 2009.

Any help ?

Hi Lucky,

Here is a site link to a pork production and sales network here in Thailand. It was posted by Shaggy some time ago and it gives regional price ranges.

http://www.mooyaso.net/

The google translator does a fair job turning it into English. Hope it helps

Isaan Aussie

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A Disappointing Outcome - What can be learnt?

Below is a photo of a litter from a first parity gilt. The gestation time was 111 days.

The farrowing was unattended and on arrival the farmer found two piglets on the left breathing, both very cold and close to coma. Despite all attempts those two died as well. The puzzle here is to interrupt what the rest of the litter tells you.

Mummified litter.pdf

I will await any responses or thoughts before offering my own opinion.

Isaan Aussie

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A Disappointing Outcome - What can be learnt?

Below is a photo of a litter from a first parity gilt. The gestation time was 111 days.

The farrowing was unattended and on arrival the farmer found two piglets on the left breathing, both very cold and close to coma. Despite all attempts those two died as well. The puzzle here is to interrupt what the rest of the litter tells you.

Mummified litter.pdf

I will await any responses or thoughts before offering my own opinion.

Isaan Aussie

Come on folks what do you think? I have a bit of inside info on this so I'll give a clue. the answer can be found in vapor. Fords Forever

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OK so we are offering clues now! Alright, heres one, it is not PRRS.

Heres another, look at the mummified (dark ones on the right) and you will see that they died at different times.

That to me leaves two options and they are both endemic in Thailand, both survive for extended periods of time in the soil.

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OK, my vote is PPV, parvo. There were no signs of sickness in the gilt prior to the birth. It is endemic in Thailand and sows that have had the disease are immune. That immunity is passed to the piglets and lasts for up to 6 months. The thought here is that many small herds may well have the virus present but the piglets are grown and sold whilst still covered by the maternal immunity.

Love to hear from anyone who has a different opinion.

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So I knew the answer before. Don't think that IA figured it out in the few sentences that he described it in. He was factoring and figuring for a long long time with many other possibilities and strategies based on what would happen with the the future herd and also the potential ramifications from where and what he was actually dealing with. Volumic amounts of reasearch, re-thinking, remembering from what and where his herd had originated and been exposed. No easy bit of forensics to say the least and to see it now described in a few sentences doesn't do justice to what it took to figure it out and also be able to deal with it. Fruity you were the wizard when it came to hogs but your protege I believe is very close to your status as "hoggy emeritus".

And of course the answer all along was in v a p o r parvo. Fluently Ford Forever

Come on you guys....put us out of our misery (please)

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So I knew the answer before. Don't think that IA figured it out in the few sentences that he described it in. He was factoring and figuring for a long long time with many other possibilities and strategies based on what would happen with the the future herd and also the potential ramifications from where and what he was actually dealing with. Volumic amounts of reasearch, re-thinking, remembering from what and where his herd had originated and been exposed. No easy bit of forensics to say the least and to see it now described in a few sentences doesn't do justice to what it took to figure it out and also be able to deal with it. Fruity you were the wizard when it came to hogs but your protege I believe is very close to your status as "hoggy emeritus".

And of course the answer all along was in v a p o r parvo. Fluently Ford Forever

Come on you guys....put us out of our misery (please)

Too kind FEF, it was a matter of assuming the worst and solving it. Turning a blind eye will cost you the whole herd ultimately. But on occasions you need the resolve and patience to let these things run their course. The pigs effected had been vaccinated as recommended and that had not succeeded. So by exposing the whole herd to each other and planning a few farrowing timings to check immunity and disease progression seemed the best bet to me. I had expected to loose up to three or four litters but only two were effected. The first lost completely, the second (the photo posted) showed progress. The latest litter had no mummifications and only one still born. If next Tuesdays litter is the same then I will rest well knowing that any and all breeding stock exposed are now immune and I have controlled the virus.

The important point here is these things are endemic and you should assume that they will pop up sooner or later. Be that Boy Scout, be prepared and deal with them.

PS Edit: For people grow/finishing pigs. PPV is something you should be aware of but not panic over. Piglets from immune pigs will carry immunity until they are finished. The risk is that some piglets may have come from naive sources and they may be infected by those will temporary maternal immunity. If you have a continuous source you should be OK. If you source from different places then immunise them all. In buying piglets check the status of recent farrowing at the source, mummifications at difference stages (size of the mummies differs) or high numbers of still born piglets are good indicators the disease. Remember the sows usually show no symptoms of disease.

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A question folks.....yesterday we lost 1 of our herd from an accident in the farrowing cage,as a result of this we lost our sow and 13 piglets (due to be born tomorrow).I know that we are not meant to get emotionally attached to any members of our herd but this is the 1st time we have lost one and to tell you the truth it hurt.My poor wife sat with the Lyndy until she past away and now is so distraught that she is thinking about stopping with pig farming.My question is has anyone else experienced this? Are we too soft because this may happen again in the future and i do not want my wife to feel like this again.

Shaggy

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A question folks.....yesterday we lost 1 of our herd from an accident in the farrowing cage,as a result of this we lost our sow and 13 piglets (due to be born tomorrow).I know that we are not meant to get emotionally attached to any members of our herd but this is the 1st time we have lost one and to tell you the truth it hurt.My poor wife sat with the Lyndy until she past away and now is so distraught that she is thinking about stopping with pig farming.My question is has anyone else experienced this? Are we too soft because this may happen again in the future and i do not want my wife to feel like this again.

Shaggy

Shaggy, I know how much losing a sow hurts, it has happened to me. I have one due to farrow this morning, hence the reason I am up and online early, waiting.

Sows are special. These are animals that you a close relationship with for two years or more, not just for a few months as one of a pen full of growing pigs. Sows are individual animals that depend on you for their well being and for that of their offspring. Unless you are close to each one you will not have their trust and be able to handle their piglets freely. Everything becomes harder and more stressful for you and especially for the pig.

Are you too soft? No, it only natural to feel the worry and the loss.

Will it happen again? Hopefully not, and it is up to you to eliminate the risk of recurrence. Have the right drugs and gear available to assist when necessary. Learn what lessons you can from this and adjust.

Your sows are expensive assets that have a major impact on farm results, but they are not pets. To be successful IMHO, you have to get tough emotionally on yourself whilst still showing calm control and affection to the pigs. We are present at farrowing to intervene and protect our investment, the awe of watching a birth is the payback not the purpose. We are farmers, not zoo keepers or animal trainers.

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A question folks.....yesterday we lost 1 of our herd from an accident in the farrowing cage,as a result of this we lost our sow and 13 piglets (due to be born tomorrow).I know that we are not meant to get emotionally attached to any members of our herd but this is the 1st time we have lost one and to tell you the truth it hurt.My poor wife sat with the Lyndy until she past away and now is so distraught that she is thinking about stopping with pig farming.My question is has anyone else experienced this? Are we too soft because this may happen again in the future and i do not want my wife to feel like this again.

Shaggy

Shaggy, I know how much losing a sow hurts, it has happened to me. I have one due to farrow this morning, hence the reason I am up and online early, waiting.

Sows are special. These are animals that you a close relationship with for two years or more, not just for a few months as one of a pen full of growing pigs. Sows are individual animals that depend on you for their well being and for that of their offspring. Unless you are close to each one you will not have their trust and be able to handle their piglets freely. Everything becomes harder and more stressful for you and especially for the pig.

Are you too soft? No, it only natural to feel the worry and the loss.

Will it happen again? Hopefully not, and it is up to you to eliminate the risk of recurrence. Have the right drugs and gear available to assist when necessary. Learn what lessons you can from this and adjust.

Your sows are expensive assets that have a major impact on farm results, but they are not pets. To be successful IMHO, you have to get tough emotionally on yourself whilst still showing calm control and affection to the pigs. We are present at farrowing to intervene and protect our investment, the awe of watching a birth is the payback not the purpose. We are farmers, not zoo keepers or animal trainers.

Thanks IsaanAussie....wise words.I hope that all went well with your sow and that she provided you with many healthy piglets.

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