Jump to content
BANGKOK

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

IsaanAussie

Pigs 101 (A Start)

Recommended Posts

Thanks IsaanAussie....wise words.I hope that all went well with your sow and that she provided you with many healthy piglets.

Yes she did. She is a gilt and one of the smallest pigs in the herd so I was watching carefully. Only ten but all vigorous and very much alive. The problem of the last few months seem a long way away right now. I just hope they stay there.

Having bred all 12 of my sows I know how attached you get to each one, hope your wife gets back "on the bicycle" soon after such a loss.

IA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm looking for some opinions on my current litters. The boar I have has been working well and to date has produced a 100% pregnancy rate. I have two very good young boars that I had been planning to bring on and get rid of Cyril. One is a Duroc and the other Landrace, both good pigs.

Here is the question. Out of four litters farrowed that he has sired , Cyril has produced over 80% gilts, best 9 of 11 piglets. What would you guys do?

If anyone is looking for a boar to breed, one of the three has to go. The two new ones are 7 and 6 months, Cyril is 15 months. They are all too good to slaughter.

Isaan Aussie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I had an upset customer calling me early in the morning...one piglet which he bought off me 1 month before has died - he blamed "wrong food type" I sold to him for the loss.

After re-checking the records, I found out that I received 10 piglets from another good customer at an age of 28 days (ย่านม)

After 10 days and 2 sacks of Betagro 301 (อาหารหมูย่านม) I eventually sold 5 of the piglets to the customer who complained today. He bought 4 sacks of 301L (อาหารหมูเล็ก) since then.

Everything went smoothly until today.

I called in the vet immediately to get to know the reason of the death and it was found that the piglet died because of that virus which is actually spreading by air around the North and Isaan.

However, the customer sticks to his version, saying that I delivered the wrong sort of food to him...thus blaming me for the death of the piglet.

You can believe me that I'm fed up with these uneducated and stubborn villagers.

After I called my sales person at Betagro, who is also a vet, I was told that I should calm down because during his daily visits to various farm he even experienced more blatant cases.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was taught that the customer is always right and I used to believe it until I came here. I can imagine that your guy is stretching the food with something else and if it is a viral death he is just trying to blame someone else and any other reason but it being his fault, either feed induced or lack of biosecurity. Do you know the weight of this grower pig? Or the chain of events surrounding the death?

I would just let that die down by itself. If you make a point of the actual reason, then for sure you will get blamed for supplying diseased pigs. If the ten piglets were all from the same litter than it is unlikely the problem was PRRS or PPV as the pigs should have maternal immunity for longer than 2 months. I would be interested in what the disease was and how the vet tested for it.

I have the same type of ignorance issues here. Many locals think I am too expensive, currently charging 2000 baht for a 10 Kg piglet. One guy told me that I should reduce the price because the piglets do not cost me anything, they are born free. I have given up trying to explain cost recovery for the boar and sow, let alone wafes and overheads. To him that didnt count because I had already spent that money. It doesnt occur to them that most young pigs they buy are just the rubbish that the large farms wont feed and sell to some middleman with a pickup truck.

In your case selling the feed and the piglets perhaps you should provide a "How to Feed a Piglet" brochure. Maybe you should dream up a story that makes everyone happy and stays away from the issues. But do not replace the pig or return any monies! If you get pushed then offer to call in the Livestock develoment people to test this guys farm and pigs. Bet you he just disappears!

Isaan Aussie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, to be honest, I supplied him with a FREE sack of 301 to calm him down early in the morning.

I also spent about half an hour to educate him about the feed type issue, thus explaining that the feed I sold to him was just according to Betagro's spreadsheet.

However, he was defiant.

Later in the morning, when I returned with the vet, that customer just arrived with a sack of SPM 105 feed and told me that he don't believes me at all.

After the vet concluded that the death was not related to the feed (after injecting some preventive medicine into the rest of the herd, which I paid in full) , the customer presented an empty pack of "medicine" which he administered to the sick piglet yesterday. After I had a look at the (Thai language) instructions, I quickly found out that the powder was for ducks and chicken...no pigs were mentioned whatsoever.

This means that the customer used the wrong type of "medicine"

Furthermore, he didn't believe that the actual weight of the herd averages 15kg - until I insisted on weighing the piglets...15kg was pretty accurate.

In fact, when the piglets arrived at my farm, average weight was 10kg, so the weight increase after 1 month of feeding was merely 5kg. Needles to say that I found traces of corn inside the pen, so it is clear that he stretches the feed...no one does this for little piglets, not even the most 'kiniau' farmers.

I just want this customer (a retired policeman) to become happy with that SPM stuff and never coming back to my store again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, to be honest, I supplied him with a FREE sack of 301 to calm him down early in the morning.

I also spent about half an hour to educate him about the feed type issue, thus explaining that the feed I sold to him was just according to Betagro's spreadsheet.

However, he was defiant.

Later in the morning, when I returned with the vet, that customer just arrived mith a sack of SPM 105 feed and told me that he don't believes me at all.

After the vet concluded that the death was not related to the feed (after injecting some preventive medicine which I paid in full) , the customer presented an empty pack of "medicine" which he administered to the sick piglet yesterday. After I had a look at the (Thai language) instructions, I quickly found out that the powder was for ducks and chicken...no pigs were mentioned whatsoever.

This means that the customer used the wrong type of "medicine"

Furthermore, he didn't believe that the actual weight of the herd averages 15kg - until I insisted on weighing the piglets...15kg was pretty accurate.

In fact, when the piglets arrived at my farm, average weight was 10kg, so the weight increase after 1 month of feeding was merely 5kg. Needles to say that I found traces of corn inside the pen, so it is clear that he stretches the feed...no one does this for little piglets, not even the most 'kiniau' farmers.

I just want this customer (a retired policeman) to become happy with that SPM stuff and never coming back to my store again.

A real no win situation. A "big face" that listens to uneducated people and believes it all. Is told what they use (can afford) and how to use it, but never trys to understand the why? 5 kg in month 2 is just rediculous, he is the cause of death, he has already destroyed any chance of getting a decent FCR at 100 Kgs. I budget for 15kg at 60 days for costing purposes but expect much better. That is why I am introducing the two new boars. The Landrace was 100 kgs at under 5 months and the duroc at a little more. The current boar is producing piglets around 1.6 Kg at birth, but a high percentage of gilts. I have yet to determine if my previous health issues are a factor, so I cannot put that down to him yet.

The point being, if you have no idea of the impact of what someone else told you to do, how can you know what is right or wrong? Amazing Thailand!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a quick question: How is this breed called ?

Today I was offered a batch, priced at 1500 ฿ per head.

moo.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres a tip for anyone who may have mummified piglets in a litter. First, it can be caused by having too many in the litter. If there are more than one or two it is likely disease related. There are a number of infectious diseases that can kill the piglets selectively but for the two virus related causes for concern, PRRS and PPV, heres how you tell what the cause is likely to be.

The piglet foetus attaches around day 30 beginning to form a skeleton which prevents it being reabsorbed completely and begins having immune responses to disease around day 70. PRRS doesnt attack before day 70 and PPV doesnt attack after then. So if you have mummies up to ranging in size up to 160 -170 mm long it is probably PPV (parvo) and longer PRRS.

Remember there are other causes.

Isaan Aussie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a quick question: How is this breed called ?

Today I was offered a batch, priced at 1500 ฿ per head.

moo.jpg

The two common white breeds here are large white and landrace. The easiest way to pick is the ears. Landrace pigs ears usually fall forward over its eyes. Even with its head stuck in the feeder my bet is still large white.

What happened to the feed cylinders?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What happened to the feed cylinders?

I received them in the state visible on the pic.

My mother in-law told me that it was necessary to remove the tank (or ton) because the piglets would play around with the feed and spill it all over the pen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What happened to the feed cylinders?

I received them in the state visible on the pic.

My mother in-law told me that it was necessary to remove the tank (or ton) because the piglets would play around with the feed and spill it all over the pen.

Thats a new one on me, opposite to what I thought. I have never seen anyone use them without the drum to regulate the feed. I have some of these feeders in my nursery pens. They are locally made and are not very good quality but work reasonably well as long as they are kept clean. The cast iron base units are much better but very expensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the feed cylinder in another pen...I never pour in too much feed, because the pigs will lift up the drum and create a real mess.

1656.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another question which I think is quite important to me: Should I feed as much as the pigs can eat or shall I feed according to a plan ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lucky,

Firstly the feeder and pigs picking up the drum. There should be a bolt set through the central shaft, about half way up. This stops the drum from being lifted up. Check if the bolt is missing. If you can lift up the cylinder, then it is gone. Having said that, I only put in as much feed as the pigs should consume to avoid spillage and wasteage. If there is too much feed, the pigs will just play with the rest.

Now the feed regime. Please note, this is only my opinion and any feeding program must have a clear objective to suit what you want to produce. I believe you should feed to appetite with growing pigs when they FCR figures are low. If you dont then you are not maximising their growth rate. Once the pigs get to around 70 Kg their growth rate has slowed per kilo consumed and over eating starts to produces fat. At that stage I try to regulate the feed to maintain a body score rating of around 2 to 3 and feed the pigs what they will eat quickly with a little extra to prevent competition. I would rather see food wasted in the bowl than on the floor and we adjust the ration to maintain a slight remaining amount in the bowls.

At 100kg the pig hasnt finished growing but requires maintenance type diets rather than high protein feed. More than they need will just get laid down as fat. Thai people doesnt seem to care how much fat the pig is carrying and the temptation is to grow them as quickly as you can to get to the magic 100kg size. The feed regime decision is farm dependant IMHO above 60 kgs.

I make final selection of possible gilts at about 60Kgs. They are fed to prepare them for an adult breeding life of several years and so you have to consider things like their calcium intake for bone structure. You may spent 3 - 4,000 baht to feed a pig to 100kgs for market, but a sow is going to cost you 10,000 to 15,000 baht per year to feed.

Last point, I use bowl feeders so observing how much each pig eats is much easier.

IA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ban on border exports of pigs to hold down retail price

By PETCHANET PRATRUANGKRAI

THE NATION

Published on June 25, 2011

The Internal Trade Department expects pork prices to drop soon after it suspends swine exports across the borders to neighbouring countries next week.

The department will ask the Goods and Service Price Committee of the Commerce Ministry to ban border exports of swine to neighbouring countries after it found a significant rise of such exports to cash in on higher retail prices.

Pig prices in Thailand are controlled at Bt70 per kilogram, while prices in neighbouring countries, mainly Vietnam and Cambodia, are Bt80-Bt90 per kilo.

Vatchari Vimooktayon, director-general of the department, said yesterday that it must enforce the ban stringently to protect domestic consumers. Any smuggling or removal of swine without the ministry's permission will result in a fine of Bt100,000 fine and/or five years in jail.

The Internal Trade Department in cooperation with the Customs and Livestock department will closely monitor the movement of swine in border provinces, Vatchari said. She pointed out that slaughterhouses in Chon Buri and Chachoengsao had noted unusual shipments to other areas.

Vatchari said that after imposing the stringent control of cross-border exports, the pork price should drop.

The ministry found that border shipments to neighbouring countries had jumped from a monthly average of 200-300 pigs to more than 1,000.

Normally, exports account for only 3-4 per cent of the total production of 12 million pigs a year.

The target retail price of pork |is Bt130 per kilogram, but the market retail price is Bt135 a kilo or higher.

As an addition effort to protect consumers from unfair trade practice, collusion, and market monopoly, the department in cooperation with the Royal Thai Police held a seminar on enforcement of the Trade Competition Act to educate officials from the Livestock Department and the police Consumer Protection Division on improved efficiency. Traders found guilty of price collusion are subject to three years' imprisonment and/or a Bt600,000 fine. Traders who overcharge face a maximum of seven years in jail and/or a Bt140,000 fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...