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Forethat

Pajero Sport - Passenger Airbag

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I have a need to remove the passenger airbag in my Pajero Sport. The obvious reason is that me and my wife sometimes want to go somewhere with our daughter without the other one being present, and this is when the baby seat needs to be positioned in the front seat.

The best solution would be to have a switch - I know there are some cars that ships with this feature - but second best would be to remove the explosives entirely.

Anyone knows if the switch option is doable? And if not, who's authorized to remove the explosives for the passenger airbag?

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For me I would go to auto electrician and just put a switch then you have it if you need later.

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For me I would go to auto electrician and just put a switch then you have it if you need later.

Is that a company name or just any auto electrician? Will that kind of solution be approved by the insurance company in case there's an accident (Buddha forbid!)?

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The correct thing to do is to put the child seat in the back correctly and have the child sit there. ANYTHING ELSE IS RISKING THE CHILD'S LIFE.

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The correct thing to do is to put the child seat in the back correctly and have the child sit there. ANYTHING ELSE IS RISKING THE CHILD'S LIFE.

So you dont have a clue, then?

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The correct thing to do is to put the child seat in the back correctly and have the child sit there. ANYTHING ELSE IS RISKING THE CHILD'S LIFE.

To meet your statement that placing the child other than in the back is risking the childs life:

According to European Traffic Security Agencies, the difference in security between a back- and front placed rear facing child safety seat is almost impossible to measure. You will have to factor in numerous parameters, for instance, which kind of accident are we talking about? The general recommendation is to use a rear-facing seat as long as possible and start using a forward facing seat no earlier than at 4 to 5 years of age. The reason for this is the child’s skeleton, muscular condition and development. Even though you don’t understand the basic logic behind this I'm sure you understand that one of the biggest reasons for using a rear-facing seat is the weight of child’s head in comparison to muscular strength in the neck.

You seem to suffer from the misconception that all accidents follows the same pattern; a face on collision. Unfortunately that’s not the case, and that is also why there are very few recommendations on placement of the baby other than to use a rear-facing position (for reasons I've stated above) and to make sure the air bag is disabled in case the child is placed in the front seat.

I'm also sure you are capable of starting a thread where this can be discussed, but the topic in this thread is HOW to disable the passenger airbag and if it is approved by the insurance company.

Edited by Forethat

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The correct thing to do is to put the child seat in the back correctly and have the child sit there. ANYTHING ELSE IS RISKING THE CHILD'S LIFE.

To meet your statement that placing the child other than in the back is risking the childs life:

According to European Traffic Security Agencies, the difference in security between a back- and front placed rear facing child safety seat is almost impossible to measure. You will have to factor in numerous parameters, for instance, which kind of accident are we talking about? The general recommendation is to use a rear-facing seat as long as possible and start using a forward facing seat no earlier than at 4 to 5 years of age. The reason for this is the child's skeleton, muscular condition and development. Even though you don't understand the basic logic behind this I'm sure you understand that one of the biggest reasons for using a rear-facing seat is the weight of child's head in comparison to muscular strength in the neck.

You seem to suffer from the misconception that all accidents follows the same pattern; a face on collision. Unfortunately that's not the case, and that is also why there are very few recommendations on placement of the baby other than to use a rear-facing position (for reasons I've stated above) and to make sure the air bag is disabled in case the child is placed in the front seat.

I'm also sure you are capable of starting a thread where this can be discussed, but the topic in this thread is HOW to disable the passenger airbag and if it is approved by the insurance company.

I believe PJS does not have a built in switch, usually key operated

I see 3 simple fix

1. Check your fuse panel, if fuses are separate for Left and Right, it should be easy enough to remove Left SRS fuse

2. Open lid for SRS and disconnect cable, do you get warning SRS/Airbag on dash?

3. Disconnect plug for SRS behind glove box

Insurance, wouldnt worry to much, they probably dont even know what an airbag is, and if they do just happy to not have to pay for airbag damaged interior

as for childs safety, rear facing front seat is one of the safest positions, but of course NO AIRBAG. In addition single driving is safer, due to more often eyes on road. Source, Swedish Folksams study of real world crashes past 2 decades

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The correct thing to do is to put the child seat in the back correctly and have the child sit there. ANYTHING ELSE IS RISKING THE CHILD'S LIFE.

To meet your statement that placing the child other than in the back is risking the childs life:

According to European Traffic Security Agencies, the difference in security between a back- and front placed rear facing child safety seat is almost impossible to measure. You will have to factor in numerous parameters, for instance, which kind of accident are we talking about? The general recommendation is to use a rear-facing seat as long as possible and start using a forward facing seat no earlier than at 4 to 5 years of age. The reason for this is the child's skeleton, muscular condition and development. Even though you don't understand the basic logic behind this I'm sure you understand that one of the biggest reasons for using a rear-facing seat is the weight of child's head in comparison to muscular strength in the neck.

You seem to suffer from the misconception that all accidents follows the same pattern; a face on collision. Unfortunately that's not the case, and that is also why there are very few recommendations on placement of the baby other than to use a rear-facing position (for reasons I've stated above) and to make sure the air bag is disabled in case the child is placed in the front seat.

I'm also sure you are capable of starting a thread where this can be discussed, but the topic in this thread is HOW to disable the passenger airbag and if it is approved by the insurance company.

Oh dear...

As I said, it's impossible to rate the safest placement of a baby until AFTER an accident. Rear facing in the front seat with the restraining seat leaning against the dashboard allows for a fixed surface much stronger than the seat. In addition, without visual contact with the baby there's a safety aspect which has been known to CAUSE accidents. If you place the baby in rear facing position in the back seat it is impossible to see what's happened if the starts screaming or chokes on something which WILL cause a parental reaction. If the child is in the front seat with you its easy to check what's happened.

From a technical/safety and statistical perspective, a rear facing position in the middle position of the back seat is the safest place in the car (regardless of accident type the center of the car is the safest) BUT not all seats have been certified for this type of position. Another extremely overlooked aspect is the instability of the car seats in case of a collision in case you didn't know there's an important factor here referred to as the "collision impulse" which will do all sorts of things with your child. I'm sure you can read up on this in case you're interested (I doubt it)

I didn't know that Australia has regulated the position of the Child in the car. So I guess its Australia vs. the rest of the world then. In US and Europe, there's no recommendation on placement:

http://www.iihs.org/...drestraint.aspx

You talk about this as if you think you have a clue what you're talking about. You don't. The modern child restraining seat industry is considerably more knowledgeable than you, both in security measures and how to use statistics to improve on already good products. A fantastic example of technology and how it is being used today is the ECE framework which dictates the rules for Isofix child restraint seats. There are several features of this which makes it interesting from a security point of view, but one of the more striking (with regards to your bullshit about risking the child's life by placing it in the front seat) features is that the passenger airbag is disabled automatically when the Isofox child seat is fitted in the front seat of cars fitted with this system. I'm willing to bet a bottle of Singha you don't know squat about Isofix, so you can start by reading this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isofix (an entire standard built on something you claim result in risking childrens lifes...!!!!)

Edited by Forethat

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I believe PJS does not have a built in switch, usually key operated

I see 3 simple fix

1. Check your fuse panel, if fuses are separate for Left and Right, it should be easy enough to remove Left SRS fuse

2. Open lid for SRS and disconnect cable, do you get warning SRS/Airbag on dash?

3. Disconnect plug for SRS behind glove box

Insurance, wouldnt worry to much, they probably dont even know what an airbag is, and if they do just happy to not have to pay for airbag damaged interior

as for childs safety, rear facing front seat is one of the safest positions, but of course NO AIRBAG. In addition single driving is safer, due to more often eyes on road. Source, Swedish Folksams study of real world crashes past 2 decades

Hmm.

I wonder if the key operated systems does exactly the same thing (basically disconnects to the explosives)?

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I believe PJS does not have a built in switch, usually key operated

I see 3 simple fix

1. Check your fuse panel, if fuses are separate for Left and Right, it should be easy enough to remove Left SRS fuse

2. Open lid for SRS and disconnect cable, do you get warning SRS/Airbag on dash?

3. Disconnect plug for SRS behind glove box

Insurance, wouldnt worry to much, they probably dont even know what an airbag is, and if they do just happy to not have to pay for airbag damaged interior

as for childs safety, rear facing front seat is one of the safest positions, but of course NO AIRBAG. In addition single driving is safer, due to more often eyes on road. Source, Swedish Folksams study of real world crashes past 2 decades

Hmm.

I wonder if the key operated systems does exactly the same thing (basically disconnects to the explosives)?

yes, the key switch, usually positioned inside glove box or on dash, disconnects the signal from Gforce sensor to explosives/airbag. Hard to sell a car in Scandinavia without it

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Had the airbag disabled earlier today. As someone pointed out earlier, there is no fuse for the airbag, so the only option was to disconnect the cable behind the glove box. The light indicates that the airbag is faulty (or not working).<br><br>When I have time (around Songkran 2017 the way it looks...) I will have a switch installed in one of the empty slots next to the rear fan switch.<br>

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Had the airbag disabled earlier today. As someone pointed out earlier, there is no fuse for the airbag, so the only option was to disconnect the cable behind the glove box. The light indicates that the airbag is faulty (or not working).<br><br>When I have time (around Songkran 2017 the way it looks...) I will have a switch installed in one of the empty slots next to the rear fan switch.<br>

When fitting the switch and or reffiting the plug. ensure you disconnect the battery.....JUST IN CASE...

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Had the airbag disabled earlier today. As someone pointed out earlier, there is no fuse for the airbag, so the only option was to disconnect the cable behind the glove box. The light indicates that the airbag is faulty (or not working).When I have time (around Songkran 2017 the way it looks...) I will have a switch installed in one of the empty slots next to the rear fan switch.

When fitting the switch and or reffiting the plug. ensure you disconnect the battery.....JUST IN CASE...

Yeah, I actually had the Mitsubishi dealer do it for me due to my respect for the explosive nature of the charge in combination with the electricity. I dare not faff around with this myself....

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