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Meltdown Likely Under Way At Japan Nuclear Reactor

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Interesting read if not right to the minute from TEPCO...

<A id=pressreleases>Press Releases

clear.gifclear.gifPress Release (Mar 13,2011)

Plant Status of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (as of 9am March 13th)dot_w720.gifAll 6 units of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station have been shut down.Unit 1(Shut down)- Reactor has been shut down. However, the unit is under inspection due to the explosive sound and white smoke that was confirmed after the big quake occurred at 3:36PM. - We have been injecting sea water and boric acid which absorbs neutron into the reactor core. Unit 2(Shut down)- Reactor has been shut down and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System has been injecting water to the reactor. Current reactor water level is lower than normal level, but the water level is steady. After fully securing safety, we are preparing to implement a measure to reduce the pressure of the reactor containment vessels under the instruction of the national government. Unit 3(Shut down)- Reactor has been shut down. However, High Pressure Core Injection System has been automatically shut down and water injection to the reactor is currently interrupted. We are examining alternative way to inject water. Also, following the instruction by the government and with fully securing safety, steps to lowering the pressure of reactor containment vessel has been taken. Spraying in order to lower pressure level within the reactor containment vessel has been cancelled.- Currently, we do not believe there is any reactor coolant leakage inside the reactor containment vessel.Unit 4 (shut down due to regular inspection)- Reactor has been shut down and sufficient level of reactor coolant to ensure safety is maintained.- Currently, we do not believe there is any reactor coolant leakage inside the reactor containment vessel.Unit 5 (outage due to regular inspection)- Reactor has been shut down and sufficient level of reactor coolant to ensure safety is maintained.- Currently, we do not believe there is any reactor coolant leakage inside the reactor containment vessel.Unit 6 (outage due to regular inspection)- Reactor has been shut down and sufficient level of reactor coolant to ensure safety is maintained.- Currently, we do not believe there is any reactor coolant leakage inside the reactor containment vessel.Casualty- 2 workers of cooperative firm were injured at the occurrence of the earthquake, and were transported to the hospital.- 1 TEPCO employee who was not able to stand by his own with his hand holding left chest was transported to the hospital by an ambulance.- 1 subcontract worker at important earthquake-proof building was unconscious and transported to the hospital by an ambulance.- The radiation exposure of 1 TEPCO employee, who was working inside the reactor building, exceeded 100mSv and was transported to the hospital.- 4 workers were injured and transported to the hospital after explosive sound and white smoke were confirmed around the Unit 1.- Presence of 2 TEPCO employees at the site are not confirmedOthers- We measured radioactive materials inside of the nuclear power station area (outdoor) by monitoring car and confirmed that radioactive materials level is higher than ordinary level. Also, the level at monitoring post is higher than ordinary level. We will continue to monitor in detail the possibility of radioactive material being discharged from exhaust stack or discharge canal. The national government has instructed evacuation for those local residents within 20km radius of the periphery because it's possible that radioactive materials are discharged.- We will continue to take all measures to restore the security of the site and to monitor the environment of the site periphery.http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/press/corp-com/release/11031305-e.html

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Sounds from this latest Reuters report like they are already pumping sea water into Fukushima Daichi No. 3.

Now engineers were pumping in seawater, trying to prevent the same thing from happening at the No. 3 reactor, the government said in apparent acknowledgement that it had moved too slowly on Saturday.

"Unlike the No.1 reactor, we ventilated and injected water at an early stage," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano told a news briefing.

Asked if fuel rods were partially melting in the No. 1 reactor, Edano said: "There is that possibility. We cannot confirm this because it is in the reactor. But we are dealing with it under that assumption. We are also dealing with the No.3 reactor based on the assumption that it is a possibility."

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/13/us-japan-quake-idUSTRE72A0SS20110313

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There are no alternatives currently. Our world needs energy to go forward. To go forward with medicine, all kind of nice things like the internet, taveling etc... nothing happens without energy.

Well, there is an option of burning coal. To understand what that means, you can go to visit some Chinese cities and ask when was the last time they saw blue sky. Or perhaps on what decade it happened.

The last nuclear plant accident was 1986. That is 25 year ago! The death toll for Chernobyl and this Japan accident has been less than people die in the traffic accidents in one year her in LOS.

Nuclear science is more challenging for the mind and therefore might scare some people. It's not that bad at all.

incorrect - a minute bit of research would so you how wrong you are. You make far too many assumptions about both the production of and future needs for energy.

Agreed with Deerai

I agree with oilinki. It seems he had thought a little bit deeper and definitely longer than the one minute some anti-nuclear scaremongers spend in google to gain 'knowledge' about the subject.

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And the latest from TEPCO today on Fukushima Daichi plant radiation levels:

Furthermore, at 3:29PM, [saturday] Mar 12, radiation dose measured at site boundary

has exceeded the limiting value. Therefore, at 4:17PM, Mar 12, it was determined that a specific incident stipulated in article 15, clause 1

has occurred.

After that, the radiation dose at the monitoring post decreased once. today [sunday], the measured value revamped and the radiation dose measured at site boundary exceeded the limiting value again. As such, at 8:56AM, today, it was determined that a specific incident stipulated in article 15, clause 1 occurred.

In essence, they're saying the radiation levels at the boundary of the plant once again exceeded the regulatory limit this morning, without saying exactly what the level or limit was.

Note - the underlining in TEPCO's, as it's their way of indicating new/updated info from their prior reports.

Edited by jfchandler

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"One of nuclear powers big advantages is that, unlike solar, it works at night," - a wonderful comment by one of the myriad clueless posters who have posted on TV over the years.I expect he was in charge of the Irish "space ship to the sun" project????

Please have the courtesy when you quote me to include the post in its entirety. And far from being clueless, I have spent most of my working life in the power generation industry, and another 8 years on a high pressure hydrogen plant.

Most solar energy advocates I have met have no idea of grid load patterns and wouldn't know a what a MegaVar was if it bit them on the bum,

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And the latest from TEPCO today on Fukushima Daichi plant radiation levels:

Furthermore, at 3:29PM, [saturday] Mar 12, radiation dose measured at site boundary

has exceeded the limiting value. Therefore, at 4:17PM, Mar 12, it was determined that a specific incident stipulated in article 15, clause 1

has occurred.

After that, the radiation dose at the monitoring post decreased once. today [sunday], the measured value revamped and the radiation dose measured at site boundary exceeded the limiting value again. As such, at 8:56AM, Today, it was determined that a specific incident stipulated in article 15, clause 1 occurred.

In essence, they're saying the radiation levels at the boundary of the plant once again exceeded the regulatory limit this morning, without saying exactly what the level or limit was.

Note - the underlining in TEPCO's, as it's their way of indicating new/updated info from their prior reports.

Not suprising John: since this happened on Friday they have been downplaying everything - the risk, the incident, and the after effects. Instead of evacuating 180,000 people from the start they decided to not risk panic, but risk lives. When all said and done - one or two Tepco officials will do the honourable thing while possibly thousands will be affected for the rest of their lives.

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I think TEPCO is obfuscating by deliberately confusing the order of events - a fine Japanese tradition by the way, you just have to know how to spot it. ...

Haters will never miss an event to use it for their propaganda. :bah:

I haven't created past incidents and accidents of TEPCO nor have I written the text in the quote. ;)

Look at the whole picture.

According to the "reliable" news you brought, the meltdown occurred already yesterday. 100% false.

You will get the wrong picture if some Japanese hating scaremonger brings you his selection of "news".

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So if a "bearded anorak" told you your house was on fire, you wouldn't do anything until a man in a suit told you he was right?

i think your methods of how to sift information are a bit weak.

Lighten up! It's the lack of balanced reporting at the BBC that gets to me. The problem is they never get any real engineers to speak. The dumbing down at the BBC forbids anything that's the slightest bit technical. So, it's much better to focus on scare mongering blokes with beards and anoraks (probably a vegetarian to boot!) I see Rachel Harvey has been sent so we will get the crew cut feminists' view on newcular power....

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BangkokEddy, there's been no indication made publicly that a complete meltdown has occurred at the Daichi No. 1 reactor..

However, the Japanese government officially has said they presume a partial meltdown has occurred inside the No. 1 reactor, and may be occurring inside the No. 3 reactor.

They're presuming that based on the release into the environment of fission materials cesium and iodine... But they're saying they can't say for certain because they can't physically access the reactor cores...for obvious reasons.

Edited by jfchandler

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And the latest from TEPCO today on Fukushima Daichi plant radiation levels:

Furthermore, at 3:29PM, [saturday] Mar 12, radiation dose measured at site boundary

has exceeded the limiting value. Therefore, at 4:17PM, Mar 12, it was determined that a specific incident stipulated in article 15, clause 1

has occurred.

After that, the radiation dose at the monitoring post decreased once. today [sunday], the measured value revamped and the radiation dose measured at site boundary exceeded the limiting value again. As such, at 8:56AM, Today, it was determined that a specific incident stipulated in article 15, clause 1 occurred.

In essence, they're saying the radiation levels at the boundary of the plant once again exceeded the regulatory limit this morning, without saying exactly what the level or limit was.

Note - the underlining in TEPCO's, as it's their way of indicating new/updated info from their prior reports.

Not suprising John: since this happened on Friday they have been downplaying everything - the risk, the incident, and the after effects. Instead of evacuating 180,000 people from the start they decided to not risk panic, but risk lives. When all said and done - one or two Tepco officials will do the honourable thing while possibly thousands will be affected for the rest of their lives.

but not surprised.... http://www.economist.com/node/1318056 from 2002

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I'd second the request made above... If you guys want to have an energy methods and engineering expertise debate...can you please take it to another more appropriate place...

Meanwhile, speaking of meltdowns, from NHK on the Daichi No. 3 reactor:

Likely partial meltdown at second reactor

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano says the level of coolant water at another reactor of the Fukushima No.1 [Daichi] nuclear power plant has decreased.

At 11 AM on Sunday, Edano told reporters that as the level of coolant at the Number 3 reactor of the Fukushima No.1 power plant has dropped, it is believed that part of the fuel rods became exposed.

This indicates the possibility that fuel rods at the reactor at the nuclear power plant may be melting, following a similar event at the Number 1 reactor on Saturday.

Edano said work was underway to ease pressure inside the reactor's container, and to pump water into it to raise the water level.

He said boric acid was added to the water to slow chemical reactions of the nuclear fuel.

Edano said radioactive materials were detected near the plant. He said the highest level of radiation recorded near the nuclear power station was 1,204.2 microsieverts per hour at 8:33 AM.

[That, I believe, is an even higher reading than the one from yesterday amid the problems with Reactor No. 1]

Edano said this was probably because the air inside the reactor's containment vessel is being discharged in an attempt to decrease the pressure.

Sunday, March 13, 2011 14:32 +0900 (JST)

http://www3.nhk.or.j...lish/13_22.html

Edited by jfchandler

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incorrect - a minute bit of research would so you how wrong you are. You make far too many assumptions about both the production of and future needs for energy.You also overlook that any rdiation takes 10s of thousands of years to die off- and has to be stored by man for that time.......

Radiation 'dies off' depends of the half life of the isotopes of the atoms. The half life (radiation will be half what it used to be) varies from micro or even nano seconds to years and years.

The another fact is that if the half life is short, eg it will die off fast, there will be a lot of radiation. On the other hand if the half life is long, there will be less radiation.

There are three basic type of radiations, which everybody should have learned in elementary school.

The most powerful radiation type is Alpha-radiation. These are huge helium nucleis, which even an sheet of paper can stop. If eaten or inflated to lungs, this is the worsts form.

Second radiation type is Beta-radiation which is an electron. An aluminium plate can stop the beta-radiation.

Third one Gamma-radiation, which is an photon with high frequency. This can penetrate even certain amount of lead.

In your daily life we encounter gamma-radiation, which is coming from the ground and also from the sky. This still does not kill us.

oilinki, I would just ignore him. It appears he is a specialist in all the areas of everything that's happening on the planet. Not so long ago he was trying to prove to everyone that it is divers who are to blame for the corals bleaching in the Andaman Sea, not the high water temperature that kills the corals. ;)

I live by the principle: "Don't argue with a fool; onlookers may not be able to tell the difference" ©.

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Let's stop the bickering gents and keep it on topic.

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but not surprised.... http://www.economist.com/node/1318056 from 2002

That's a good article James, similar to the Reuters one above recounting TEPCO's past faults and abuses...

I particularly liked this segment about the resignation of their then president back at that time, who was in charge during the period they falsfied all the reactor safety reports:

Mr Minami will oversee an internal probe, which is expected to find that a secretive corporate culture and a bureaucratic aversion to inconvenience—in other words, standard Japanese business practices—are among the chief culprits.

If that's how well the Japanese manage their nuclear power plants....gotta wonder... what would it mean for Thailand?

Quick.. the reactor's overheating... pour on the som tam??? :o

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Edano said radioactive materials were detected near the plant. He said the highest level of radiation recorded near the nuclear power station was 1,204.2 microsieverts per hour at 8:33 AM.

Tywais, I'm trying to get the hang of this, but I was an English major, and sucked at math, in university...

So does 1,204 microsieverts per hour radiation mean it was 1.2 sieverts per hour???

Edited by jfchandler

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