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Japanese Tourist Shot Dead In Chiang Rai By Thai Tour Guide


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Most people reading this story could care less if the Japanese tourist was mafia or not. They will however, remember that a Thai tour guide murdered one of his guests.

As if the tuk-tuks and jet ski scams were not enough. Now you can come to Thailand, on vacation, and be murdered by your Thai host simply because he does not like you.

Another brick in the wall.

How exactly are you reaching your conclusion about most people not caring if the "victims" were yakuza or not? IMHO most people will look at a story like this and NOT read "tourist" murdered in Thailand, but will read "Japanese mobster dies in Thailand."

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Another armchair expert on the subject of opium production. Have you ever seen opium being grown? Did you know that it is very easy to spot opium from the air? You honestly think that these tribal people at Chiang Rai are morons don't you?

Burmese Wa Army guys came from Burma. Not Thailand. Can you even see the difference?

The other guy was saying opium. My reply was about opium and not crystal meth.

Yes. I did know it is easy to spot from the air. It's especially easy to spot from the ELINT suite of an MC130. I spent quite a bit of time working with poppy eradication teams. Where did you garner your expertise on opium smuggling may I ask that you feel qualified to call someone you don't know an armchair expert? Maybe you can PM me your address and we can explore the topic of your expertise in more detail?

Opium growing, and opium processing are two entirely different ventures. The golden triangle is not as legendary for growing it, as it is for being a central point for smuggling and processing. Yes, they probably did stop actually growing it there since the US Government, at the invitation of the Thai government runs a coordinated poppy eradication program.

My comment on meth bing smuggled through Chiang Rai was in reply to your statement Chiang Rai is not a transshipment point for smugglers. This is obviously an incorrect assumption as that very same day Burmese Meth smugglers were busted there. Well...at least that is my armchair expert opinion.

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Did I say that Chiang Rai was NOT a transhipment point? Please tell me where I said it.

The place I was referring to is not along the Thai-Myanmar border. It is not the place where illegal drugs are transported. But you jump at the opportunity to show what a well informed person you are.

Hilltribe people were encouraged to grow opium legally before WWII. Three provinces were identified by the Government for opium production - Mae Hong Song, Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai. People who were encouraged to grow were the Hilltribes. However, things changed when opium production was made illegal in the year 1959.

Things got a bit messy when the Koumintang arrived in Chiang Rai in the early 50's. Lots of dirty S$%^t going on behind the scene. Everyone's hand dirty. Include your own government. Ha ha...

If there is opium production still going on in Chiang Rai, it is far from the levels of that being produced in 2000. But you make it look like opium production is still very widespread. Where did you get your intel on this?

Yes. I did know it is easy to spot from the air. It's especially easy to spot from the ELINT suite of an MC130. I spent quite a bit of time working with poppy eradication teams. Where did you garner your expertise on opium smuggling may I ask that you feel qualified to call someone you don't know an armchair expert? Maybe you can PM me your address and we can explore the topic of your expertise in more detail?

Opium growing, and opium processing are two entirely different ventures. The golden triangle is not as legendary for growing it, as it is for being a central point for smuggling and processing. Yes, they probably did stop actually growing it there since the US Government, at the invitation of the Thai government runs a coordinated poppy eradication program.

My comment on meth bing smuggled through Chiang Rai was in reply to your statement Chiang Rai is not a transshipment point for smugglers. This is obviously an incorrect assumption as that very same day Burmese Meth smugglers were busted there. Well...at least that is my armchair expert opinion.

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Yeah...no opium in the golden triangle. What color is the sky in the universe you live in? The hill tribes have been processing opium for hundreds of years. Maybe it is less in your face, but it is still there, and now we have added Meth to the mix as well.

Opium was introduced into the hills of Southeast Asia as a cash crop relatively recently, about 150 years ago. Prior to that it was harvested in India and Turkey. There has been relatively little opium production within the Thai borders since the 1980s. There are still to be found a few small poppy plots for tourists to admire. Cross border traffic in illegal drugs use to be raw opium, but by the early 1980s, after the police action against Khun Sa in Hin Taek, the processing labs had moved across the border and the traffic tended to be in refined heroin. Over the last 15-20 years most of the labs and drug traffic has switched to methamphetamines as the old school opiate dealers like Khun Sa in Burma and his able lieutenant in Thailand Laota, retired or were temporarily imprisoned and replace by the meth crowd, still financed by the same cast of characters in Bangkok.

And what's with Doi Hang? I though that was just west of Chiang Rai town. You would need to follow the Kok river on almost a straight line in a northwest direction, into Chiang Mai province, and to the Burmese border to do some serious drug business.

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Yeah...no opium in the golden triangle. What color is the sky in the universe you live in? The hill tribes have been processing opium for hundreds of years. Maybe it is less in your face, but it is still there, and now we have added Meth to the mix as well.

Opium was introduced into the hills of Southeast Asia as a cash crop relatively recently, about 150 years ago. Prior to that it was harvested in India and Turkey. There has been relatively little opium production within the Thai borders since the 1980s. There are still to be found a few small poppy plots for tourists to admire. Cross border traffic in illegal drugs use to be raw opium, but by the early 1980s, after the police action against Khun Sa in Hin Taek, the processing labs had moved across the border and the traffic tended to be in refined heroin. Over the last 15-20 years most of the labs and drug traffic has switched to methamphetamines as the old school opiate dealers like Khun Sa in Burma and his able lieutenant in Thailand Laota, retired or were temporarily imprisoned and replace by the meth crowd, still financed by the same cast of characters in Bangkok.

And what's with Doi Hang? I though that was just west of Chiang Rai town. You would need to follow the Kok river on almost a straight line in a northwest direction, into Chiang Mai province, and to the Burmese border to do some serious drug business.

That pretty much sums it up except I think your under estimating the opium trade out of Burma. Perhaps through Laos these days.

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Seems there may be a bit more to this story.

Anyhow,... if the victim is in fact a member of the Yakuza then his killer might well be advised to skip country or quietly vanish (if he can make bail) and lay low as I expect they'd be all over this one.

Note to self: Don't argue with tour guides on remote trekking tours!

May be or then again may be not.. If he's at the top of the pyramid there maybe some pretty appreciative seconds in command..

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Perhaps if the tour guide had been on time instead of 1 hour late, this shooting would not have occurred.

I'm sure we have all been angry on many occasions due to the Thais lack of time-keeping.

Thai time keeping is not the best in the world, I have to shoot one or two of mt staff every week.

Hopefully just small caliber.

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Has to be way more to this story than meets the eye.

Supposidely the tour guide was a manager or someone of importance at a local very busy coffee, restaurant, and cocktail place that has long been rumored to have connections in high places.

Pretty fishy this guy was taking 2 male japanese tourists who wern't exactly young trecking to the rural areas.

All 3 of them surely knew what they were doing, and if there was an alterior motive to the tour.

A 9 mm pistol was reportedly found in one of the backpacks, and the dead tourists gun holster was empty. Where was the gun he reportedly used ?

Could not have been in the backpack since he was shot in the back and head fatally.

Truth in this story is somewhere in the middle of the guides story and the evidence released so far.

The guide had time to think about and make up his story to fit the crime before having a friend call the police to turn himself in.

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These two fit the description of the "quality", high spending tourists that the government wants, Yakuza or not. Yakuza are not street punk gangsters, but business people who do nto see the law as a boundary to making money, They have their own laws which are above those of the land. They, themselves, are as old as the land (nearly).

Yakuza or not ,people with money will be put off by this - and it is one of the main reasons people come to Thailand. There may be hundreds of guides, but they all seem to visit the same villages, and offer the same or very similar packages. High spenders are also highly sensitive to violent crimes against them - with good reason. If this guy is Yakuza, he would have had bodyguards and safe houses back home - this will remind them to take similar steps IF they decide to visit Thailand. It will remind those without that luxury, that Thailand is not always safe as the government might want you to think it is.

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The tour guide has tats too. He is a gangster too, for sure.

WOW , what can one say about this.

In Thai culture, unless it is a religious tattoo (like the Muay Thai boxers, and the monks have) - traditionally that person is a "black" person and involved in crime or is chained to the wheels of crime. you will notice a lot of girls in Sukhumvit have tattoos too, there is a reason for it. it is an indication of their social status and their occupation. Not always correct, but a good guideline.

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The tour guide has tats too. He is a gangster too, for sure.

WOW , what can one say about this.

In Thai culture, unless it is a religious tattoo (like the Muay Thai boxers, and the monks have) - traditionally that person is a "black" person and involved in crime or is chained to the wheels of crime. you will notice a lot of girls in Sukhumvit have tattoos too, there is a reason for it. it is an indication of their social status and their occupation. Not always correct, but a good guideline.

ACtually, you are presenting a broad stereotype that is no longer socially valid.

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The tour guide has tats too. He is a gangster too, for sure.

WOW , what can one say about this.

In Thai culture, unless it is a religious tattoo (like the Muay Thai boxers, and the monks have) - traditionally that person is a "black" person and involved in crime or is chained to the wheels of crime. you will notice a lot of girls in Sukhumvit have tattoos too, there is a reason for it. it is an indication of their social status and their occupation. Not always correct, but a good guideline.

What a load of BS !! Half the foreign tourist women have tattoos, it a fashion thing and always has been

other than the religious ones that some need to adorn themselves with .

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