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Child Labour In Thailand Remains A Problem: DLPW

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Child labour remains a problem: DLPW

By The Nation

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The number of child labourers in Thailand is decreasing but not enough to get the country out of trade sanctions, the Department of Labour Protection and Welfare (DLPW) told a Bangkok seminar yesterday.

While the new "15 years of free education" policy keeps more children in schools, employment of underage workers born to illegal immigrants is still widespread and difficult to control, said DLPW directorgeneral Amphorn Nitisiri.

Young workers aged 1518 - permitted to work legally in certain jobs under International Labour Organisation (ILO) regulations - numbered 510,000 last year, compared to 580,000 in 2006 and 640,000 in 1996.

A national policy that began in 2009 and ends in 2014 is being conducted jointly with the ILO to further reduce the number of those working legally, as well as to tackle illegal employment or child slave labour.

The US has imposed import quotas on Thai products believed to have exploited child labour in Thailand. The types of sanctioned products are shrimp, clothing and certain foods made of palm sugar juice.

The DLPW seminar, which was attended by NGO officials, employers and employees and ended yesterday, aimed to seek solutions to the problem of child labour.

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-- The Nation 2011-05-27

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"Young workers aged 15-18 - permitted to work legally in certain jobs under International Labour Organisation (ILO) regulations - numbered 510,000 last year, compared to 580,000 in 2006 and 640,000 in 1996.

A national policy that began in 2009 and ends in 2014 is being conducted jointly with the ILO to further reduce the number of those working legally, as well as to tackle illegal employment or child slave labour."

I'm not quite sure I understand this - they're trying to REDUCE the number of people who are working LEGALLY? What are they trying to do? Increase unemployment?

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"Young workers aged 15-18 - permitted to work legally in certain jobs under International Labour Organisation (ILO) regulations - numbered 510,000 last year, compared to 580,000 in 2006 and 640,000 in 1996.

A national policy that began in 2009 and ends in 2014 is being conducted jointly with the ILO to further reduce the number of those working legally, as well as to tackle illegal employment or child slave labour."

I'm not quite sure I understand this - they're trying to REDUCE the number of people who are working LEGALLY? What are they trying to do? Increase unemployment?

A national policy that began in 2009 and ends in 2014 is being conducted jointly with the ILO to further reduce the number of those working legally, as well as to tackle illegal employment or child slave labour.

I believe this is just the usual lack of proofreading by The Nation. :)

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If no child 11 - 14 is working in Thailand,this is already an impressive achievement.

Some teens (15 - 18) are better at learning a manual job than sit in a classroom. Eventually, they'll be richer and happier than the ones who fail in high school and do not have any skill.

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The Civil and Commercial Code still contains language which allows parents to demand labor from their children. That may need to change as Thailand becomes a post-agricultural society.

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If no child 11 - 14 is working in Thailand,this is already an impressive achievement.

Some teens (15 - 18) are better at learning a manual job than sit in a classroom. Eventually, they'll be richer and happier than the ones who fail in high school and do not have any skill.

Are you serious and retarded or just having a laugh?

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If no child 11 - 14 is working in Thailand,this is already an impressive achievement.

Some teens (15 - 18) are better at learning a manual job than sit in a classroom. Eventually, they'll be richer and happier than the ones who fail in high school and do not have any skill.

for someone who has a preta as his photo you show a wierd understanding of life. Since when has riches brought happiness?..... and education is the only way to escape slavery..

http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig6/case8.html

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If no child 11 - 14 is working in Thailand,this is already an impressive achievement.

Some teens (15 - 18) are better at learning a manual job than sit in a classroom. Eventually, they'll be richer and happier than the ones who fail in high school and do not have any skill.

for someone who has a preta as his photo you show a wierd understanding of life. Since when has riches brought happiness?..... and education is the only way to escape slavery..

http://www.lewrockwe...rig6/case8.html

That is an excellent link you provided, but as it discribes there is a difference between education and teaching, in Thailand the majority at school are not given the tools to achieve that education required.

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The boys in the photograph look to me to all be about 15yo I think that is perfectly legal here?:jap:

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The Civil and Commercial Code still contains language which allows parents to demand labor from their children. That may need to change as Thailand becomes a post-agricultural society.

Thailand is still about 80% agriculture and it will need to continue that way, so I dont think there is anything "post" about it, and children are required to attend school until 15 years old and children are allowed by law to work in family business when they are over 15 and during school holidays when under 15. but there are laws governing work conditions and hours children can work.

Children under 15 can legal work in Thailand as they can in most western countries, I was 9 years old when I started working in the UK I was delivering newspapers, and leaflets and when I left school at 15yo I was a farm laborer. But I am glad to say I became very successful in the media industry (without a full formal education). :jap:

Edited by newermonkey

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hey, somebody has to become : your maid, your waittress, your gardener, your cheap sex toy in know places

they all do not need higher education

god forbit everybody starts to be too smart...then they will have to import more foreign (burma) cheap labor to do those low paid jobs

a dose of sarcasm and a pinch of irony needed

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Child Labour?

I worked since I was 13 years of age. First delivering free newspapers, then in restaurants and hotels and later in a travel business when I reached 17. There was nobody to protect me and the many others who still work during their teen years back in sunny England.

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Child Labour?

I worked since I was 13 years of age. First delivering free newspapers, then in restaurants and hotels and later in a travel business when I reached 17. There was nobody to protect me and the many others who still work during their teen years back in sunny England.

So very true. How soon we forget?

But if they really want to clear up the real child labour. Easy just send in dedicated uncorrupt offilials to sort it out. There is the problem, "uncorrupt".

jb1

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As far as I know, the only labour that kids are allowed to do, is to aid their parents in roles such as farming, running the family shop etc. The kids must still go to school.

So if the issue is legal work, this organisation is running up the wrong tree. Most kids in Thailand do go to school. That is a truth. Of course, kids fall through the cracks, as happens all over the world. This is what needs to be addressed.

But I would think that having kids in school, but working to help the family is a hell of a lot better than ending up with them begging on the streets because they aren't able to contribute to help the family.

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A great shame that parents in this Country don't have the children they can afford, but instead concentrate on having as many as they can, so that the kids will then send them money when they get old. ohmy.gif

Personally I think that since we stopped shoving children up chimneys, that signalled the end of the Great British Empire. whistling.gif

I had summer jobs when I was a young teenager, it seems to me an essential part of a child's education. jap.gif

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