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george

20-Year-Old Briton Electrocuted To Death On Bangla Road, Phuket

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I don't get it. Reading here I only see criticisms of the Thai way. You don't seem to realize that things like this actually are what make Thailand what it is; the place we have chosen to live or visit on holiday. Here there aren't laws and regulations for everything; and the ones there are aren't enforced very strictly. This gives you the wonderful freedom to use your head and be responsible for yourself instead of having others packing you into cotton balls and deciding what's best for you.

I surely feel sorry for the young man's family and friends because of this tragic accident. However Thailand is what it is and accident like this occur here. Before going here on holiday, or to live here, you should be aware of that, and make up your mind whether you are willing to run the risks that goes with it or not. People ought to be responsible for themselves instead of always just blaming things on others.

I have worked and lived most of my life in 3rdworld countries, been in the midst of civil wars, terrorist attacks, mob rule, and similar stuff. Yet I'm still alive, have never been hurt, badly cheated, or otherwise burned my fingers severely. I surely had my share of bad experiences, but when that happened I only blamed myself for my lack of forethought, not the place or the people I had chosen to be amongst. Once I had a close friend killed by a dentist in Bangladesh. Who's really to blame? The poorly educated dentist who gave my friend an overdose of anaesthesia or my highly educated friend who was stupid enough to go to a dentist in Bangladesh? If you are a smoker and catch lungcancer can you then blame the tobacco industry?

If you want babysitter mentality with laws and regulations for everything try out a place like Denmark or Singapore instead of Thailand. I'm sure you're going to love it :bah: .

Good post and spot on. When you come to Asia wake up Mommy isn't here to tuck you in at night and bring you a glass of hot milk.

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It is already a miracle that nobody who tried to help the poor Briton was not killed also from electrocution.

I learned already in primary school that before helping a person, victim of electrocution, one must cut off the power first or use insulated equipment

I agree Rule N# 1 never touch a victim of electricution before the area has been isolated. It appears everyone is taught that from day one except Thai's . You hear so many stories of farangs being electicuted in Thailand (swimming pools, hotwater heaters and just walking around) how many thais are dying daily from eletricution? Electricity and Thai's are a bad combination, just walk along any street anywhere in Thailand and look at the disasters just waiting to happen. Every footpath cafe' and eatery you will see wires laying on the ground with plug after plug piggybacking each other on the ground, rain pouring down. 1/2 the time they don't even use plugs just 2 bare wires stuck into the points. The concept of earthing hasn't even been considered in Thailand as yet. Do they actually have local government safety inspectors who monitor all these roadside establishments and enforce strict safety standards. Thier public liability insurance must be through the roof if they could even get it.

Condolences to family and friends of this latest victim. To the Thai's that tried to help, a little foolish but at least you tried to do something.

"Everyone is taught from day One!" Who says?

In the UK we were taught first aid to save lives and not to leave them to die. We are taught to immediately pull the person who is attached to the live conductor away using a dry insulating material such as a scarf, rope, belt, shirt. I used to joint live underground 415V power cables in the UK, it is not dangerous if you insulate yourself from earth.

Saved a few people this way when working in power plants.

Must agree on the safety issue, I put my own earth spike in my house and ELCB. The problem with Thailand is that they adopted the British Voltage of 240V whilst using the Japanese/American plugs and sockets which are designed for 110V centered tapped to earth at the Local Electricity Boards transformer which means that the maximum voltage to earth in Japan and America is only 55V, which is much much safer. The heart can suffer ventricular fibrillation at any voltage above 40V which is the minimum voltage that will give rise to sufficient milliamps to cause a heart siezure. Persons with dry thick skin with high resistance do not get a high enough passage of current to cause a problem. I used to work with a Polish Electrical Foreman who used to touch the cable with his finger to check if the conductors were live or not.

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Also that doesnt sound like AC current? Its usually high vold DC current that makes you drop or cant release something when shocked it contracts the muscles. AC was introduced because it makes you jump i you get a shock, jump away and release the wire/plug etc

I think that you will find that the exact opposite applies ! DC causes a violent shock that 'normally' causes the body to be thrown off the power source; whereas AC causes the muscles to contract in sympathy with the frequency of the supply line - typically 50 cycles per second and you 'normally' cannot release your hand etc from the supply.

I understand that if you use an 'Isolating Transformer' you have NO reference (circuit/conducting path) to earth and therefore the only way that you can sustain a 'shock' under these conditions is to be in contact with BOTH of the supply lines at the same time and hence form a conducting path for the current to flow. Hence the reason for using the 'Isolation Transformer'when working with electrical equipment like drills etc when working outside or inside come to that. Maybe someone more knowledgeable than myself would like to comment on this and why if this IS the case do we have AC supplies that ARE referenced to Earth in the first place?

With regard to the comment about someone not using swimming pools out here in Thailand; I can only assume that one could only receive a 'shock' if there was faulty wiring around the pool that contacted the water itself, because the underwater pool lights are normally run off 'Isolating transformers' that step the AC down from AC 220v to around AC 12v to supply the halogen lamps in the underwater fittings. The AC 12v would in itself not be sufficient to cause any shock and again it would be isolated from an earth/water reference, provided that there was no problem with the said transformer.

You are wrong, this is text book stuff we learn in Electrical Engineering. I have worked on AC an DC up to 400kV. DC will hold you on, where as AC(Alternating Current)normally allows you to pull away. I know from experience after getting a belt on a large DC operated Valve whilst working on it in a Power Plant with a permit to work and declaration that it had been isolated and was safe. There used to be a lot of DC mains pwer supplies in the UK in the early days, but this was dropped for the above reason.

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I never walk outside anymore when its raining or flooding in the streets. Its just to many electrical wires in Bangkok .

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Most of the electrical wiring I have seen in many places is "jerry rigged". I do not think there are any building codes, but if there are, brown envelops put in hands of any inspectors if there inspectors bipass the building codes.

There is a guest house called Sweety's Guest House in Khao San road that looks like a wiring nightmare. The owner hasn't sunk any money into that building since Buddha himself

walked the earth. If there ever was a fire there, it would no doubt be cause by very old electrical wiring. It is a serious mangle of old wiring held together by electrical tape; old electrical

tape.

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Some people mentioned that people died from electrocution in swimming pool in Thailand. I read the shower heat accident before, but how do you get electrocuted in swimming pool in Thailand?

Rip to the kid. Lesson learnt: We need to be aware of our surroundings.

From the non-grounded pool lights of course. It happened to a tourist last year. That was one that made the news, probably have been others since then. In the USA, swimming pools lights are required to have 3 methods of ground.

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I mean how could an electricity socket covered in water be so dangerous?

Freaking idiots.

Maybe he's used to manditory safety regulations and earthed sockets back home, the health and safety reg's never reaches far past western europe!

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Well as an electrical engineer I am puzzled by the account it cannot be correct. Electricity takes the path of least resistance, why travel up his arm and through his body to ground rather than just across to ground directly? We have a saying, it is not the electric shock that kills you, it's the shock of the shock. With higher voltages it's the burns that do the damage.

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"I saw a Thai guy electrocuted while up a pole. He was thrown clear and his colleagues put a corregated iron sheet on him for ten minutes. Then he got up and went back up the pole! amazing"

Hmmm, sounds like Jesus to me. Were you drinking wine?huh.gif

Edited by FOODLOVER

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Police report on the death of the young Briton.

The suspected reason that caused his death is most likely to be a faulty socket and it is probable that it might have been dangerous to touch. However, the exact reason could not be identified because the quantity of electricity samples from the case was insufficient.

Despite the best efforts of the Thai authorities and their international partners in undertaking an exhaustive investigation, the electricity that caused the death in this event could not be identified and it can not be determined exactly how the young man might have been exposed to it, or if he even attempted suicide.

Now that's what I call reporting. Great job.

Thanks!

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Songkran, Chiang Mai 2011. What are the odds that this marvel of electrical repair work isn't live on the day when thousands of soaked people in bare feet are celebrating with their attention on the fun rather than the dangers underfoot?

1251787145_gJV9z-XL.jpg

I did warn them by the way, but they didn't seem too bothered.

Edited by Greenside

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The majority of people posting on this thread (>90%) about what they believe the theory of electricity or electrocution to be or how the poor tourist died don't have a clue as to what they are talking about. There are indeed a couple of informed/educated people posting. If you don't know what you are talking about then refrain from posting. Some fool may think you know what you are talking about and follow your advice and go out and accidentally electrocute his/herself.

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I mean how could an electricity socket covered in water be so dangerous?

Freaking idiots.

C'mon mate ! don't you understand, they are using rubber soled shoes now ..........................problem solved !

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First off, my condolences to this guy's friends and family members.

But I want to know why this young man was sitting on the floor in the first place. I would NEVER sit on the floor of ANY outdoor urban area. Great way to expose yourself close up to all manner of filth. Yuck.

Also, all this talk about how Thailand lacks electric safety and the Thais being "uneducated animals". Whatever happened to common sense? Stay away from electrical ANYTHING when it's raining or it's rained. Don't touch dangling wires. Don't touch electrical devices with wet hands, especially ATMs and other things like that outside.

Here in the USA we have a lot of "cowboys" doing their own electric - and I've gotten "bitten" by ATMs where the current has been leaking to the metal frame of the machine. It's not just Thailand. It's not just Asia. It's EVERYWHERE. I'm sure it happens a lot in lily-perfect Europe also, even with all your grounding and over-designed plugs and what-not.

I know this was an accident and this guy probably slapped his hand on the floor (yuck) without seeing what was there first. This time it was a light socket. It could just as well have been a dog turd or a spent heroin needle or anything. It was just his time to go.

Lesson in life is, don't sit on the outside floor and always be vigilant of where you put your hands down.

"ITS EVERYWHERE".........................Talk for America if you like, but i guarantee you see nothing like this in Australia. Electrical installations here are far far too strictly controlled and policed!

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