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george

20-Year-Old Briton Electrocuted To Death On Bangla Road, Phuket

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Well, today I went to the ATM at the Family Mart in Nanai at the corner of Soi 2 to check my bank account. I did so many times before, but in nice weather conditions. Today my Flip-Flops were wet, and when touching the first key on the keyboard I had this "exiting nice feeling" of a ungrounded piece of metal connected to a hot lead. I just used my purse to push the cancel-button and left. The next time I won't touch any ATM in the rain. :angry:

Um, this sounds kinda weird, but I used to get the same feeling when I plugged my playstation into the tele. Then I realised that the grounding that is needed had been rigged up, but not connected. It looked like it had been done, but it too was a death trap waiting to happen.

So I had to get on the net and find out how it is done, then get an electrician, (Who turned up on his motorbike wearing a motorbike taxi uniform, and of course without any tools to his name. Maybe he was just after money and saw the risk of being electrocuted was worth the 500 we were gunna give him.) to follow instructions from me as to how I wanted it done. Problem was solved.

Incidentally ! just what training do Thai Electricians have, or do they learn, as i suspect, by just watching the boss ?

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I can't tell from the pictures exactly where the plug socket is located but it may be helpful for some posters to understand that the front of Ocean Plaza is covered by a rigid and permanent awning following renovation works last year. The awning is very large and provides cover for a number of businesses that operate in front of the plaza - it's also worth noting that the outdoor base is raised above street level. Therefore, it's not exactly as though someone decided to fit a power socket in the middle of an open or totally unprotected area, it's also not clear where the water that caused the flooding came from, rain water ingress or someone with a hosepipe/bucket.

Just wanted to add a little balance to the story since a number of people seem to be going off at the deep end on this one, not least of which is someone blaming the deceased for being up and awake at 06:00, quite amazing really.

I think that you have missed the point. That 0600hrs remark was just a "tongue in cheek" remark, referring to possible official Thai conclusions. We all know how stupid these can be.

Edited by oldsailor35

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I can't tell from the pictures exactly where the plug socket is located but it may be helpful for some posters to understand that the front of Ocean Plaza is covered by a rigid and permanent awning following renovation works last year. The awning is very large and provides cover for a number of businesses that operate in front of the plaza - it's also worth noting that the outdoor base is raised above street level. Therefore, it's not exactly as though someone decided to fit a power socket in the middle of an open or totally unprotected area, it's also not clear where the water that caused the flooding came from, rain water ingress or someone with a hosepipe/bucket.

Just wanted to add a little balance to the story since a number of people seem to be going off at the deep end on this one, not least of which is someone blaming the deceased for being up and awake at 06:00, quite amazing really.

I think that you have missed the point. That 0600hrs remark was just a "tongue in cheek" remark, referring to possible official Thai conclusions And we all know just how stupid they can be..

Edited by oldsailor35

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I don't get it. Reading here I only see criticisms of the Thai way. You don't seem to realize that things like this actually are what make Thailand what it is; the place we have chosen to live or visit on holiday. Here there aren't laws and regulations for everything; and the ones there are aren't enforced very strictly. This gives you the wonderful freedom to use your head and be responsible for yourself instead of having others packing you into cotton balls and deciding what's best for you.

I surely feel sorry for the young man's family and friends because of this tragic accident. However Thailand is what it is and accident like this occur here. Before going here on holiday, or to live here, you should be aware of that, and make up your mind whether you are willing to run the risks that goes with it or not. People ought to be responsible for themselves instead of always just blaming things on others.

I have worked and lived most of my life in 3rdworld countries, been in the midst of civil wars, terrorist attacks, mob rule, and similar stuff. Yet I'm still alive, have never been hurt, badly cheated, or otherwise burned my fingers severely. I surely had my share of bad experiences, but when that happened I only blamed myself for my lack of forethought, not the place or the people I had chosen to be amongst. Once I had a close friend killed by a dentist in Bangladesh. Who's really to blame? The poorly educated dentist who gave my friend an overdose of anaesthesia or my highly educated friend who was stupid enough to go to a dentist in Bangladesh? If you are a smoker and catch lungcancer can you then blame the tobacco industry?

If you want babysitter mentality with laws and regulations for everything try out a place like Denmark or Singapore instead of Thailand. I'm sure you're going to love it :bah: .

Newbie or not that was an outstanding post, agreed totally.

Me too! :thumbsup:

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I can't tell from the pictures exactly where the plug socket is located but it may be helpful for some posters to understand that the front of Ocean Plaza is covered by a rigid and permanent awning following renovation works last year. The awning is very large and provides cover for a number of businesses that operate in front of the plaza - it's also worth noting that the outdoor base is raised above street level. Therefore, it's not exactly as though someone decided to fit a power socket in the middle of an open or totally unprotected area, it's also not clear where the water that caused the flooding came from, rain water ingress or someone with a hosepipe/bucket.

Just wanted to add a little balance to the story since a number of people seem to be going off at the deep end on this one, not least of which is someone blaming the deceased for being up and awake at 06:00, quite amazing really.

I think that you have missed the point. That 0600hrs remark was just a "tongue in cheek" remark, referring to possible official Thai conclusions And we all know just how stupid they can be..

Apologies if I miss interpreted your post, actually quite reassuring if I did.

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I don't get it. Reading here I only see criticisms of the Thai way. You don't seem to realize that things like this actually are what make Thailand what it is; the place we have chosen to live or visit on holiday. Here there aren't laws and regulations for everything; and the ones there are aren't enforced very strictly. This gives you the wonderful freedom to use your head and be responsible for yourself instead of having others packing you into cotton balls and deciding what's best for you.

I surely feel sorry for the young man's family and friends because of this tragic accident. However Thailand is what it is and accident like this occur here. Before going here on holiday, or to live here, you should be aware of that, and make up your mind whether you are willing to run the risks that goes with it or not. People ought to be responsible for themselves instead of always just blaming things on others.

I have worked and lived most of my life in 3rdworld countries, been in the midst of civil wars, terrorist attacks, mob rule, and similar stuff. Yet I'm still alive, have never been hurt, badly cheated, or otherwise burned my fingers severely. I surely had my share of bad experiences, but when that happened I only blamed myself for my lack of forethought, not the place or the people I had chosen to be amongst. Once I had a close friend killed by a dentist in Bangladesh. Who's really to blame? The poorly educated dentist who gave my friend an overdose of anaesthesia or my highly educated friend who was stupid enough to go to a dentist in Bangladesh? If you are a smoker and catch lungcancer can you then blame the tobacco industry?

If you want babysitter mentality with laws and regulations for everything try out a place like Denmark or Singapore instead of Thailand. I'm sure you're going to love it :bah: .

Newbie or not that was an outstanding post, agreed totally.

Me too! :thumbsup:

Outstanding post indeed! Yet I hope the family is going to sue the dept. store to the max Thai laws allows.

It won't bring the poor kid back but it might save some lives in the future.:unsure:

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It is already a miracle that nobody who tried to help the poor Briton was not killed also from electrocution.

I learned already in primary school that before helping a person, victim of electrocution, one must cut off the power first or use insulated equipment

I agree Rule N# 1 never touch a victim of electricution before the area has been isolated. It appears everyone is taught that from day one except Thai's . You hear so many stories of farangs being electicuted in Thailand (swimming pools, hotwater heaters and just walking around) how many thais are dying daily from eletricution? Electricity and Thai's are a bad combination, just walk along any street anywhere in Thailand and look at the disasters just waiting to happen. Every footpath cafe' and eatery you will see wires laying on the ground with plug after plug piggybacking each other on the ground, rain pouring down. 1/2 the time they don't even use plugs just 2 bare wires stuck into the points. The concept of earthing hasn't even been considered in Thailand as yet. Do they actually have local government safety inspectors who monitor all these roadside establishments and enforce strict safety standards. Thier public liability insurance must be through the roof if they could even get it.

Condolences to family and friends of this latest victim. To the Thai's that tried to help, a little foolish but at least you tried to do something.

"Everyone is taught from day One!" Who says?

In the UK we were taught first aid to save lives and not to leave them to die. We are taught to immediately pull the person who is attached to the live conductor away using a dry insulating material such as a scarf, rope, belt, shirt. I used to joint live underground 415V power cables in the UK, it is not dangerous if you insulate yourself from earth.

Saved a few people this way when working in power plants.

Must agree on the safety issue, I put my own earth spike in my house and ELCB. The problem with Thailand is that they adopted the British Voltage of 240V whilst using the Japanese/American plugs and sockets which are designed for 110V centered tapped to earth at the Local Electricity Boards transformer which means that the maximum voltage to earth in Japan and America is only 55V, which is much much safer. The heart can suffer ventricular fibrillation at any voltage above 40V which is the minimum voltage that will give rise to sufficient milliamps to cause a heart siezure. Persons with dry thick skin with high resistance do not get a high enough passage of current to cause a problem. I used to work with a Polish Electrical Foreman who used to touch the cable with his finger to check if the conductors were live or not.

Have to correct you on the outlets in the states are nothing like the ones in Thailand. The only thing in the states that comes close would be a 220v 20 amp outlet. The 110v 20a outlet uses a larger prong for the neutral and a smaller prong for the voltage or hot side. If you take a meter and measure across hot and ground you will read 110 volts also across neutral you will read 110 volts. As it is the amps that kill you and not the volts we may need to rethink your 55 volt statement.

Also a couple of other statements another post , no you cannot let go of 110 volt alternating current it will cause the muscles to contract and you will not be able to let go. I was taught if you suspect something being hot use the back of your hand to check. If you do get a shock the contraction of the hand will be away from the hot source allowing you to pull away. Hot used in this context is for something being charged with voltage.

Edited by moe666

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Any voltage over 50VAC is recognised as a hazardous voltage under normal circumstances. (IEC).

In the case of cardiac arrest, CPR must be commenced immediately. The survival rate for just CPR is about 1%. With a defibulator it is about 15%.

Cardiac arrest can be caused by electric shock, poisoning or drowning.

With electric shock, the victim must be removed from the source of electric shock with out causing harm to the rescuer. The person commencing CPR can call on any member of the public for assistance. An ambulance must also be called.

Unfortunately, in Thailand very few persons understand CPR and basic life support.

Due to the circumstances it is very unlikely that the victims life could have been saved.

Responsibilty for the accident lies with the building owner in the first instance. A formal investigation by the PEA would need to be carried out first.

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It is impossible to prevent an electric shock, one can only minimise the risk and the effects of electric shock. An electrical installation shall be free of electrical risk as far as is practicable.

A voltage of less than 50VAC can be sustained indefinitely under normal circumstances, 25VAC or less in damp conditions, (IEC61200-413)

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Well, if he would not have been there at 6 am the accident would have never happened = it is his own fault. Welcome to the biggest congregations of clowns; I keep proclaiming = too many clowns, not enough circuses. Do you seriously thing, assume, hope or expect anything to change in this country? Try to imagine what would happen, if a Thai would get electrocuted in London. Good luck this is hypothetical as it will never happen and hence Thais are never at fault!

a Thai young lady got electrocuted to death by lightning in Hyde Park, London, a few years ago. She was wearing a bra with support wires in it.

Well, today I went to the ATM at the Family Mart in Nanai at the corner of Soi 2 to check my bank account. I did so many times before, but in nice weather conditions. Today my Flip-Flops were wet, and when touching the first key on the keyboard I had this "exiting nice feeling" of a ungrounded piece of metal connected to a hot lead. I just used my purse to push the cancel-button and left. The next time I won't touch any ATM in the rain. :angry:

You should have told the management immediately - though it might not have been dealt with.

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Have to correct you on the outlets in the states are nothing like the ones in Thailand. The only thing in the states that comes close would be a 220v 20 amp outlet.

The size of the internal components of our USA 15 and 20 amp 110 and 220 volt sockets are all the same. The limiting factors involve the shape and pattern of the slots molded into the outlet's front cover. If you were to put a 15-amp/125 volt socket next to a 20-amp/125V, 15A/250V and 20A/250V sockets and crack the front covers off, you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between them just by looking at the internals.

The 20-amp/240V socket you're thinking of doesn't have one pin larger than the other. It has one pin set at a 90 degree angle.

Ditto the plugs. The pins are just arranged differently in the housing. Parallel, tandem or two different configurations of 90 degree offsets. Look at a NEMA configuration chart one of these days.

Where you start seeing significant differences is in receptacles and plugs for 30 amps and above. The pins and the housings they're set into are definitely thicker.

On our 15-amp/125V outlets, one pin is SOMETIMES (not always) made a little wider to enforce polarization of some appliances. The wider pin goes to the neutral conductor. The standard-sized one goes to the live.

Most replacement plugs found in USA shops don't have this feature, however.

So sometimes you're stuck with replacing a polarized factory-moulded plug with a non-polarized standard device. For a double-insulated device like a portable radio or a fan, you really don't need the polarizing feature.

The USA-type 125V/15A two parallel-pin socket that you see all over the place in Thailand can obviously handle 220 volts at 15 amps with no problem. In fact, the same outlets are used at the same current levels in China, Peru, Bolivia and many other countries with no problem.

It's not the socket/plug system that's the problem. It's people's cavalier attitudes towards electrical safety that are. A chunky BS-1363 plug and socket by itself would not have prevented this man's death.

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I don't get it. Reading here I only see criticisms of the Thai way. You don't seem to realize that things like this actually are what make Thailand what it is; the place we have chosen to live or visit on holiday. Here there aren't laws and regulations for everything; and the ones there are aren't enforced very strictly. This gives you the wonderful freedom to use your head and be responsible for yourself instead of having others packing you into cotton balls and deciding what's best for you.

I surely feel sorry for the young man's family and friends because of this tragic accident. However Thailand is what it is and accident like this occur here. Before going here on holiday, or to live here, you should be aware of that, and make up your mind whether you are willing to run the risks that goes with it or not. People ought to be responsible for themselves instead of always just blaming things on others.

I have worked and lived most of my life in 3rdworld countries, been in the midst of civil wars, terrorist attacks, mob rule, and similar stuff. Yet I'm still alive, have never been hurt, badly cheated, or otherwise burned my fingers severely. I surely had my share of bad experiences, but when that happened I only blamed myself for my lack of forethought, not the place or the people I had chosen to be amongst. Once I had a close friend killed by a dentist in Bangladesh. Who's really to blame? The poorly educated dentist who gave my friend an overdose of anaesthesia or my highly educated friend who was stupid enough to go to a dentist in Bangladesh? If you are a smoker and catch lungcancer can you then blame the tobacco industry?

If you want babysitter mentality with laws and regulations for everything try out a place like Denmark or Singapore instead of Thailand. I'm sure you're going to love it :bah: .

Newbie or not that was an outstanding post, agreed totally.

Me too! :thumbsup:

Theres a big difference between being culturally tolerant and accepting, and being apathetic about life threatening shortcuts and bad choices..

Should we just say discos shouldnt have fire escapes because thats how its done ?? Or passenger ferries may as well skip the life jackets because.. well.. lifes cheap ?? Lets forget seat belts or crash helmets.

Someone choose to put that there.. That choice cost a young man his life. Unless poor judgement like that gets punished theres no reason for the next person not to also use poor judgement, and also cost lives. Thai or farang, people deserve better. To argue otherwise is to say we may as well remain cavemen, because 'thats how it was'.. Suggesting that people should expect the ground to not kill them is not the first leak in the dyke of some Orwellian big brother nanny state, its not the mark of some superior social freedom.

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