Jump to content
BANGKOK
Sign in to follow this  
george

20-Year-Old Briton Electrocuted To Death On Bangla Road, Phuket

Recommended Posts

So are they going to fix it!?! Or mai bpen rai?

What a tragic end for the tourist victim.

A masseuse who works in the Ocean Plaza forecourt said today that she had heard about the incident, but was not aware that the man had died.

What body parts is she massaging? :jap: RIP>>>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also that doesnt sound like AC current? Its usually high vold DC current that makes you drop or cant release something when shocked it contracts the muscles. AC was introduced because it makes you jump i you get a shock, jump away and release the wire/plug etc

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/770179-overview#a0104

High-voltage DC often causes a large single muscle contraction that throws the victim away from the source; thus, usually only brief duration of contact occurs with the source flow. In contrast, AC of the same voltage is considered to be approximately 3 times more dangerous than DC, because the cyclic flow of electrons causes muscle tetany that tends to prolong victims' exposure to the source. Muscle tetany occurs when fibers are stimulated at 40-110 Hz; thus, the standard 60 Hz of household current is within that range. If the source contact point is the hand, when tetanic muscle contraction occurs the extremity flexors contract, causing the victim to grasp the current and bring it closer to the body causing prolonged contact with the source.

Table 1. Physiologic Effects of Different Electrical Currents (Open Table in a new window)

EffectCurrent (milliamps)Tingling sensation/perception1-4Let-go current – Children3-4Let-go current - Women6-8Let-go current – Men7-9Skeletal muscle tetany16-20Respiratory muscle paralysis20-50Ventricular fibrillation50-120

Direct current (DC) injury: These injuries typically cause a single muscle contraction that throws the victim away from the source. They are rarely associated with loss of consciousness unless there is severe head trauma, and victims can often provide their own history.

http://emedicine.med...770179-clinical

Edited by atyclb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"and view myself as a grateful guest'....I would at least expect not to get killed by an act of negligent wiring in one of Thailand's major tourist holiday resorts.

It would be very naive to think that the wiring in Phuket is any better or worse than anywhere else in Thailand, some places in Bangkok may be the exception. A visitor only has to walk down almost any street and look upwards to see the masses of wires that form the electrical distribution system to understand that the situation is far from perfect - one of the first things I learned when I came to Thailand in the 1990's was never to touch anything metal when it rains or when near water, that still holds true today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How did his hand come to accidentally touch a ground-mounted socket? It must have been some story!

RIP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Police report on the death of the young Briton.

The suspected reason that caused his death is most likely to be a faulty socket and it is probable that it might have been dangerous to touch. However, the exact reason could not be identified because the quantity of electricity samples from the case was insufficient.

Despite the best efforts of the Thai authorities and their international partners in undertaking an exhaustive investigation, the electricity that caused the death in this event could not be identified and it can not be determined exactly how the young man might have been exposed to it, or if he even attempted suicide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poor fellow. They could of saved him, if they knew one thing. Do not touch/grab the fellow to pull him away; simply run and ram him as hard as you could. It may of knocked him right out off of it, depending on what position he was in. The electricity was passing through him and grounding him to the plate. Sorry, I was not there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Police report on the death of the young Briton.

The suspected reason that caused his death is most likely to be a faulty socket and it is probable that it might have been dangerous to touch. However, the exact reason could not be identified because the quantity of electricity samples from the case was insufficient.

Despite the best efforts of the Thai authorities and their international partners in undertaking an exhaustive investigation, the electricity that caused the death in this event could not be identified and it can not be determined exactly how the young man might have been exposed to it, or if he even attempted suicide.

where is this report from? , and are they having a f%$cking laugh to even mention it might be Sucide ! , Amazing Thailand

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Police report on the death of the young Briton.

The suspected reason that caused his death is most likely to be a faulty socket and it is probable that it might have been dangerous to touch. However, the exact reason could not be identified because the quantity of electricity samples from the case was insufficient.

Despite the best efforts of the Thai authorities and their international partners in undertaking an exhaustive investigation, the electricity that caused the death in this event could not be identified and it can not be determined exactly how the young man might have been exposed to it, or if he even attempted suicide.

where is this report from? , and are they having a f%$cking laugh to even mention it might be Sucide ! , Amazing Thailand

You may call it satire, and you can find similarities to another real police report.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is this a scene from the new movie Final Destination 5? Sounds like one... :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:ph34r:'A masseuse who works in the Ocean Plaza forecourt said today that she had heard about the incident, but was not aware that the man had died.

“We knew about the power socket, but we didn’t know that it could be so dangerous. Some of us used to walk barefoot around here, but now we all wear rubber soles all the time,” she said.':whistling:

Complete <deleted>.. happens right next to where you work, you KNOW exactly what happened.. you don't hear a bit of the story.. not that it would have changed the tragic outcome of such an incident but what is it with the culture of simply lying about everything, here, like its ok somehow if it makes you sound less in the know about sh*t that happens .. even when there's no need as it's not your neck on the block anyway???!!!!!!!:ermm:

:wai:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, if he would not have been there at 6 am the accident would have never happened = it is his own fault. Welcome to the biggest congregations of clowns; I keep proclaiming = too many clowns, not enough circuses. Do you seriously thing, assume, hope or expect anything to change in this country? Try to imagine what would happen, if a Thai would get electrocuted in London. Good luck this is hypothetical as it will never happen and hence Thais are never at fault!

Ahh, so electricity stops becoming lethal at 9am does it? Of course its his own fault because of the time of day, we all forgot that electricity is so tempramental to what time of day it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Thais and his friend who tried to help clearly had no knowledge of what to do to free him, the last thing you do is try and pull them off with your bare hands.

Thailand is an electrical death trap, however nothing will change.

Edited by travelmann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“We knew about the power socket, but we didn’t know that it could be so dangerous. Some of us used to walk barefoot around here, but now we all wear rubber soles all the time,” she said.

HA ha ha typical Thai solution!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I mean how could an electricity socket covered in water be so dangerous?

Freaking idiots.

To answer your question.

Very simple. They had a problem with the fuse blowing every time the power outlet got wet.. It was installed horizontal, instead of vertical so water would not collect inside the socket. These are all those little stupid farang ideas Thais do not need to bother with.

And it is not only Thais who do foolish things, I see many farang in Thailand who fit right in with the Thais. At one of the golf courses they have a German - Khoa San Rd backpacker - who gives himself out as an German Ingeneur. One day driving out the main gate they were digging three holes, I thought they were going to set three flag poles. How wrong I was. The German Ingeneur installed three floodlights, one in each hole. I told the Thai technician that will not work, you will have electrical shorts every time birds fly over and piss on the floodlight. He said, I know. And so it was. The floodlights constantly were shorting out and have disappeared and the holes are filled in and cemented over. Need money to replace the water pump for the complex or swimming pool, what for you still have one more pump which is the backup pump so now they operate on the backup pumps. This German guy reminds me of all those Germans after WW II coming into California as immigrants. Every one and his brother was a VW Ingeneur and their fathers und uncles were Porsche Ingeneurs. In my off days from flying I made some good money, fixing up their ####ps.

So the electrical engineer of the complex fixed it, it just so happen he was down to his last cigarette in its package so he took the foil of the cigarette package and wrapped it around the fuse and screwed the fuse back in its socket. Problem fixed.

Oh, the screw in fuses, never seen them in your country, then you are not old enough, after WW II in the developed world they disappeared and were replaced with automatic breakers of different Amperage. The screw in type are still available in Thailand VERY CHEAP - lot less expensive than automatic breakers and when they blow just take some foil and wrap it around the fuse probable then it will handle one hundred Amps, maybe more. LOL in LOS.

Edited by metisdead
Font, use default forum font when posting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off, my condolences to this guy's friends and family members.

But I want to know why this young man was sitting on the floor in the first place. I would NEVER sit on the floor of ANY outdoor urban area. Great way to expose yourself close up to all manner of filth. Yuck.

Also, all this talk about how Thailand lacks electric safety and the Thais being "uneducated animals". Whatever happened to common sense? Stay away from electrical ANYTHING when it's raining or it's rained. Don't touch dangling wires. Don't touch electrical devices with wet hands, especially ATMs and other things like that outside.

Here in the USA we have a lot of "cowboys" doing their own electric - and I've gotten "bitten" by ATMs where the current has been leaking to the metal frame of the machine. It's not just Thailand. It's not just Asia. It's EVERYWHERE. I'm sure it happens a lot in lily-perfect Europe also, even with all your grounding and over-designed plugs and what-not.

I know this was an accident and this guy probably slapped his hand on the floor (yuck) without seeing what was there first. This time it was a light socket. It could just as well have been a dog turd or a spent heroin needle or anything. It was just his time to go.

Lesson in life is, don't sit on the outside floor and always be vigilant of where you put your hands down.

What tosh, I have never had an electric shock from a UK cash machine yet you say its "everywhere"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...