Jump to content

Dozens Of Crocodiles Escape From Crocodile Farm In Pattaya


Recommended Posts

Crocodiles escape from flooded farm in Thailand

thai_crocodile7277.jpg

Dozens of crocs on the loose in Pattaya. File photo.

Bangkok - Thai teams on Tuesday captured 22 crocodiles that had escaped from a flooded farm near a popular beach resort and were hunting for more of the missing reptiles.

The animals escaped the Million Year Stone Park and Crocodile Farm in Pattaya, 100 kilometres south-east of Bangkok, after heavy rain triggered a flood that washed through the tourist attraction Monday.

'We don't know how many are still missing but I'm confident that we can catch them all because these animals aren't used to finding food for themselves,' farm spokesman Suthawudh Temthab said.

About 100 employees were sent to hunt the crocodiles down.

The largest of the recaptured reptiles, identified as Jao Yai, weighed more than 400 kilograms and was three metres long.

'Jao Yai was found nearby,' Suthawudh said. 'He was making his way back to the farm himself.'

The farm is a commercial establishment dealing in crocodile skin and meat, with about 2,800 of the reptiles.

Thailand has been hit by unusually heavy monsoon rains over the past two months that have claimed at least 87 lives. The victims include French tourist Remi Huet, 34, who was swept away Saturday while bicycling near a waterfall in Prachinburi province, 100 kilometres north-east of the capital.

On Friday, heavy rains triggered floods and mudslides in three villages in Nam Phad district, Uttaradit province, 430 kilometres north of Bangkok, killing at least five people and destroying 41 homes.

According to the Department of Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, this year's monsoon rains have affected more than 570,000 people in 16 provinces.

Thailand's rainy season lasts from May to October.

--Deutsche-Presse-Agentur 2011-09-13

footer_n.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 77
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

"'We don't know how many are still missing but I'm confident that we can catch them all because these animals aren't used to finding food for themselves,' farm spokesman Suthawudh Temthab said."

This is so comforting. They'd surely not be seeking food after starving.

Link to post
Share on other sites

what the owner won't be able to find, locals will do the job killing escaped animals for the meat and skin. Rarely there are reports of the escaped crocodiles attacking people, but there is always a danger meeting a hungry croc.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"'We don't know how many are still missing but I'm confident that we can catch them all because these animals aren't used to finding food for themselves,' farm spokesman Suthawudh Temthab said."

This is so comforting. They'd surely not be seeking food after starving.

lollllll

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting that only 22 escaped (or were caught?).

After all they have (had?) 2.800.

Good, that they have names, Jao Yai sounds cute.

And sure they dont bite since they are not used to finding their own food!

The saying goes: Dont teach the crocodile to swim.

But in Pattaya arent they called Crocothai?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember years ago while living in Pattaya the same thing happened a few years after the park first opened. Seems they didn't do a very good job of fixing the problem, but at least there will be allot of roadside Crock meat stalls in the area once againclap2.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

a couple of weeks we went to an old zoo that still had crocs in the lake (thread here) as there has been significant flooding in Chanthaburi we were wondering this morning what the water levels in that area were like, and whether they were still behind bars.

As for them not being used to finding food, the ones we saw certainly had a decent idea - they were off the banks and into the water within a couple of minutes of me going to the fence, and swam directly towards me.

none as big as this one from news last week though - 1075kg and 6.4m. No thanks.

_55178521_012824648-1.jpg

A giant saltwater crocodile weighing more than a tonne has been captured in a remote southern Philippine village following a series of attacks on humans and animals, officials said.

Measuring 6.4m (21ft) and weighing 1,075kg (2,370lb), it is the biggest to be caught alive in the Philippines in recent years.

more

Edited by Atmos
Link to post
Share on other sites

"The largest of the recaptured reptiles, identified as Jao Yai, weighed more than 400 kilograms and was three metres long.

'Jao Yai was found nearby,' Suthawudh said. 'He was making his way back to the farm himself.'"

Apparently Jao Yai must have left his national i.d. at the park before going out with his mates for a piss-up!:blink: How else would they know his name?:whistling:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...