Jump to content
BANGKOK 23 May 2019 10:01
Sign in to follow this  
Lite Beer

New National Park Chief Says Deforestation Goes Rampant

Recommended Posts

New national park chief says deforestation goes rampant

BANGKOK, 25 September 2011 (NNT)- The Director-General of the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation has ruled out political involvement in the recent reshuffle of officials.

Newly appointed chief of the National Parks Department Damrong Pidet confirmed that the reshuffle was actually aimed at putting the right people on the right jobs, not a move to eliminate anyone’s enemies or promote anyone’s cronies as some people may understand.

Mr Damrong stressed that what the public should pay most attention to was not the transfer but rampant deforestation. He disclosed that illegal wood loggers were growing in number and becoming influential, putting rare species, particularly Siamese Rose Wood under threat.

The new national park department chief also admitted that some officials in the department conspired with these people, adding that even related agencies were reluctant to help solve the problem.

Mr Damrong said the most efficient officials had been put in charge of three major national parks where rare species are at risk

nntlogo.jpg

-- NNT 2011-09-25 footer_n.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good to see a conspiracy officially confirmed for once.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At present the lives of the people in central Thailand are disrupted by the flooding. At the end of the dry season the annual recurring forest fires are making life unpleasant for the people of northern Thailand.

These forest fires and the rampant deforestation in northern Thailand, which seems to be unstoppable, are contributing to the flooding.

The first barrier to stop the rainwater flow off are the forests and their humus layer. The more chance the water gets to seep into the soil, the less flow off there will be.

The Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation employs some highly intelligent and capable people but they are powerless against "the corrupt big people" this country is full off. Some major Law changes are necessary before effective policing can be done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Forestry Department is up against an enemy determined to profit from the cutting of rare and valuable hardwood trees.

This forest cover is essential in areas where clear cutting causes severe runoff and endangers human lives.

My simple solution.

Set up a dedicated management team, well trained with all available technology, off road vehicles, boats, helicopter and weapons.

Post signs at all roads into protected forest areas stating that cutting trees is a crime.

"WARNING! You are entering a protected forest area, anyone cutting timber will be shot on sight Have a nice day!"

(I await the legal team).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually the yearly forest fires are a good thing as they burn off a years accumalation of debrie. Instead of suppressing every fire as they have done in the states the yearly fires burn mostly the yearly accumalation and doesn't burn the trees.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, but of course ... corruption.

Despite all of new Director-General of the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation's best efforts and most sincere intentions to stop the Thai government official's devouring corruption, he can but fail.

May Buddha bless him ... but, they are Thai government officials ... and, this is, after all, Thailand ... where corruption is stronger than Buddhism.

Sad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At present the lives of the people in central Thailand are disrupted by the flooding. At the end of the dry season the annual recurring forest fires are making life unpleasant for the people of northern Thailand.

These forest fires and the rampant deforestation in northern Thailand, which seems to be unstoppable, are contributing to the flooding.

The first barrier to stop the rainwater flow off are the forests and their humus layer. The more chance the water gets to seep into the soil, the less flow off there will be.

The Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation employs some highly intelligent and capable people but they are powerless against "the corrupt big people" this country is full off. Some major Law changes are necessary before effective policing can be done.

Since living in Chiang Mai for quite some tme, I've seen, without exaggeration, at least 100,00 rai of woodland been cut down. Ironically, some of this is not very far from forestry stations. Much of the burn off smoke is actually from Burma, tho' the Thai and hilltribe farmers and foragers don't help matters.There's also the theory that smoke will mask satellite pics of the area of illegal logging.

Edited by scotbeve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly this is another case of greed trumps good. I hope the government shuffle does some good to preserve what's left of the forests.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Forestry Department is up against an enemy determined to profit from the cutting of rare and valuable hardwood trees.

This forest cover is essential in areas where clear cutting causes severe runoff and endangers human lives.

My simple solution.

Set up a dedicated management team, well trained with all available technology, off road vehicles, boats, helicopter and weapons.

Post signs at all roads into protected forest areas stating that cutting trees is a crime.

"WARNING! You are entering a protected forest area, anyone cutting timber will be shot on sight Have a nice day!"

(I await the legal team).

Maybe they can employ Gen. Panlop. He stated he had experience leading 'Death Squads'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He admitting to corruption? That's a switch.

Nice one.

Sometimes it takes a "switch" to whip the department in to shape :whistling:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...