Jump to content
BANGKOK
Sign in to follow this  
SimonD

Village Life Experiences

Recommended Posts

Hello again Simon.

It’s very evident in your postings on the forum that you can hardly wait to get to the village next year. I sincerely hope all goes well and you settle into a new, successful and happy life. Without repeating our differing financial circumstances – well covered in my earlier comments – if your GF and family continue to extend sincerity, warmth and appreciation in return for your input and gestures, as my crowd do despite my limitations, you will succeed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I endorse Mr. Reds advice about keeping a 'nest egg' just in case things go 'tits up.' In my case it would have to be the money sitting in the Thai bank for my annual extension of stay. My thinking under those circumstances is, a 'tits up' situation or major health problem could dictate my fate - and at my age it's a gamble I live with. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Jezz and MrRed, good advice indeed!

Apart from the 800k or so that has to sit in the Thai bank for retirement visa purposes, or whatever the proportion is needed when offset against my monthly income, in the first instance I will only be transferring enough to cover the costs of building and equipping the house and buying a vehicle. Later, if things go well, I might free up a bit more to start my missus off in running a small mini-mart/bar, which the village lacks, but that can wait until I've researched it more throughly. The bulk of my funds will, however, remain in the UK.

Jezz, you are so right about my desire to get cracking with this project. If the mini-mart does get off the ground all you guys will be invited to the launch party!:D

Roll on 2012!B)

Simon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Jezz and MrRed, good advice indeed!

Apart from the 800k or so that has to sit in the Thai bank for retirement visa purposes, or whatever the proportion is needed when offset against my monthly income, in the first instance I will only be transferring enough to cover the costs of building and equipping the house and buying a vehicle. Later, if things go well, I might free up a bit more to start my missus off in running a small mini-mart/bar, which the village lacks, but that can wait until I've researched it more throughly. The bulk of my funds will, however, remain in the UK.

Jezz, you are so right about my desire to get cracking with this project. If the mini-mart does get off the ground all you guys will be invited to the launch party!:D

Roll on 2012!B)

Simon

Great! just send a PM when you throw the party and I'll hitch a ride to enjoy a celebration beer with you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NICE POST (#7) JEZZ! Spot on mate people only like to refer to bad stories people seldom post good experiences. Wish you a happy retirement in LOS!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NICE POST (#7) JEZZ! Spot on mate people only like to refer to bad stories people seldom post good experiences. Wish you a happy retirement in LOS!

Thank you, Maprao. Your comment is greatly appreciated. I trust life is treating you kindly and wish you happiness, health and good fortune.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It’s interesting to note the different reactions and comments in threads such as this. Reading between the lines it appears that the majority of farangs living in Thai villages are blessed with monetary good fortune which allows them choose a particular lifestyle. And why not indeed? On the other hand I feel that many resident farangs rarely put a point of view highlighting the other side of the coin – like mine; ie: – living on a tight budget. I remember reading a post a couple of years ago from one such chap who even published his annual budget on the forum – split right down into precise baht amounts on a daily basis for every item of expenditure! Okay over the top maybe, but certainly confirms many falangs do indeed live very simple lives happily. Then, conversely to opinions expressed here about not wanting to meet or mix with other expats, one often sees announcements from guys seeking drinking companions who speak English to break their boredom. I wonder how many chaps in the not-so-well- off group would jump at the chance to meet and chat with similar without feeling embarrassed over worrying about getting into expensive rounds in a bar? Maybe there’s room for thought for a ‘Only Surviving But Happy’ club who could organize cheap and cheerful meet-ups, members contributing a little bit to a kitty? Problem would almost certainly be travelling to and from the appointed places though! Mm – only a thought that’s very unlikely to appeal – or work.

Count me in on your Only Surviving But Happy Club :). I will eventually be settling down in e Yasothon/Maha Chana Chai area in the hopefully not too distant future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's interesting to note the different reactions and comments in threads such as this. Reading between the lines it appears that the majority of farangs living in Thai villages are blessed with monetary good fortune which allows them choose a particular lifestyle. And why not indeed? On the other hand I feel that many resident farangs rarely put a point of view highlighting the other side of the coin – like mine; ie: – living on a tight budget. I remember reading a post a couple of years ago from one such chap who even published his annual budget on the forum – split right down into precise baht amounts on a daily basis for every item of expenditure! Okay over the top maybe, but certainly confirms many falangs do indeed live very simple lives happily. Then, conversely to opinions expressed here about not wanting to meet or mix with other expats, one often sees announcements from guys seeking drinking companions who speak English to break their boredom. I wonder how many chaps in the not-so-well- off group would jump at the chance to meet and chat with similar without feeling embarrassed over worrying about getting into expensive rounds in a bar? Maybe there's room for thought for a 'Only Surviving But Happy' club who could organize cheap and cheerful meet-ups, members contributing a little bit to a kitty? Problem would almost certainly be travelling to and from the appointed places though! Mm – only a thought that's very unlikely to appeal – or work.

Count me in on your Only Surviving But Happy Club :). I will eventually be settling down in e Yasothon/Maha Chana Chai area in the hopefully not too distant future.

You are on the unofficial list of would-be members for a date maybe to be announced, or may well never be announced! Whatever, good luck with your plans. Feel free to PM me anytime if you want to chat, moan, suggest something or just to say Hi!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in for a party at any time. :whistling:

My take is that you will usually get what you deserve... :rolleyes:

Good luck to you all! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in for a party at any time. :whistling:

My take is that you will usually get what you deserve... :rolleyes:

Good luck to you all! :D

What about Issan Farmers number 3 at your place in Feb. I'll be there.( I drink anything) even fermented floodwater as long as it's over 5%

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in for a party at any time. :whistling:

My take is that you will usually get what you deserve... :rolleyes:

Good luck to you all! :D

What about Issan Farmers number 3 at your place in Feb. I'll be there.( I drink anything) even fermented floodwater as long as it's over 5%

Ok with me, will probably be one of the topics at number 2 :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Simon,

I followed and commented on your recent post about loudspeaker towers in villages. Your subsequent comments made more sense and explained your reasoning for considering village life.

These are my own thoughts on the subject:

Q) Why am I living in an Isaan village?

A) I first came to Thailand in 2005, then aged 61, divorced, redundant with little money, no property or assets in the UK. In other words, just about down and out. My only lifeline hung on a single remaining endowment policy which had been hammered into the ground and would only return about one-and-a-half million baht on maturity in 2009. I managed to get a job in Pattaya with a holiday company – legally with a work permit – lived in a small rented apartment in Jomtien, earned a bit of money, played the field with bar girls, moved to the company's Phuket office during 2006, played the field with Phuket bar girls then went off to work in Bali for a few months.

In 2007 I moved to Koh Samui, worked for the original company and one night met a girl from Isaan who had just that day arrived on the island intending to work in a bar for the first time. I went to that bar every night for a week or so and kept her boss happy by spending a bit of money over the bar whilst enjoying the company of his latest recruit, so she never left the premises with any other falang. She never drank alcohol or smoked. (Still doesn't to this day, apart from maybe two bottles of Spy a year!) A while later she left the bar and moved into my rented house. At the end of 2008 we went to Phuket where I worked until the end of that year, when the job was no longer available. I hadn't saved any money because the income just covered rent and living expenses

Our relationship continued to be excellent; no expectancy or demands for money because she knew I hadn't got any! After a lot of thought and discussion I decided the best route would be to move to her village, wait for my one-and-a-half million baht insurance maturity, then spend some of it converting her parent's house on stilts to incorporate a new modern house underneath. The remaining cash would need to stay in the Thai bank in order to qualify for 'Extension Based on Marriage'. We lived up in the old house with her mama, papa and her two young sons for a year until the new house below had been completed. By that time I qualified to receive the British state pension, enhanced with extra sums from SERPS and Graduated Benefits (a left over benefit system entitled to from previous years)

We married legally in Bangkok in 2009 so my pension is topped up with Wife Benefit (which can no longer be applied for and ends in 2020!) The grand total monthly income is a very modest amount that many farangs would gasp at and cry, 'How on Earth do you manage to survive?" Which leads to the next question.

Q) How do I survive in the village?

A) I've always preferred country life. I'm fortunate to have a Thai family who are totally unobtrusive – even the year spent living together in the old upstairs house wasn't a problem – believe it or not. Now, Mama and Papa live upstairs, myself, the wife and two boys live in the modern air-conditioned house below. The parents or any other visiting family members never encroach on our space, in fact even when invited to join us they prefer to visit ma and pa via the outside back steps leading upstairs, or once in a while sit in the shade under our front porch. It's all very civilized and workable. The total cost to convert the house was no more than I would have spent on rent in places like Pattaya or the islands in just three years. Yes, If I could afford to live down south I would quite enjoy somewhere like Samui with nice beaches, but can live without the sea.

Our lifestyle is simple. Now approaching my 68th birthday I'm quite content with a routine of early morning walks along the quiet soi, (we're on the edge of the village) or down by the river that runs at the back of the house and through nearby temples with beautiful grounds. A potter in the garden, a few hours online, or watching my favorite movies and British TV shows, or writing fiction and screenplays (I did have a novel published last year as an eBook and completed a screenplay, neither likely to make money or get noticed, so please don't ask!) Sometimes a motorbike ride to the small town a couple of kilometers away, visiting the market and 7-eleven, a monthly trip by public transport to the city for supermarket shopping. And of course a few beers or something later in the day at home. Because the villagers know I'm not a rich falang, the men never scrounge beer or whiskey from me, although occasionally I ask neighbors to share a beer with me. I'm the only falang in the village; I do miss good English conversation sometimes, but wouldn't want the life spent around guzzling in bars in town too often even if it was affordable.

My wife helps out on the family farm and runs the domestic things at home. Hopefully we'll have a little money saved to take the kids for a holiday to the coast next year. It'll be a bus trip to keep the cost down.

that could be a bit too simple for some people .james hat yai :bah:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's interesting to note the different reactions and comments in threads such as this. Reading between the lines it appears that the majority of farangs living in Thai villages are blessed with monetary good fortune which allows them choose a particular lifestyle. And why not indeed? On the other hand I feel that many resident farangs rarely put a point of view highlighting the other side of the coin – like mine; ie: – living on a tight budget. I remember reading a post a couple of years ago from one such chap who even published his annual budget on the forum – split right down into precise baht amounts on a daily basis for every item of expenditure! Okay over the top maybe, but certainly confirms many falangs do indeed live very simple lives happily. Then, conversely to opinions expressed here about not wanting to meet or mix with other expats, one often sees announcements from guys seeking drinking companions who speak English to break their boredom. I wonder how many chaps in the not-so-well- off group would jump at the chance to meet and chat with similar without feeling embarrassed over worrying about getting into expensive rounds in a bar? Maybe there's room for thought for a 'Only Surviving But Happy' club who could organize cheap and cheerful meet-ups, members contributing a little bit to a kitty? Problem would almost certainly be travelling to and from the appointed places though! Mm – only a thought that's very unlikely to appeal – or work.

I'd join your club. I see the " with only that amount of income, you shouldn't be living here" posts all the time. I guess I could live on the streets of America. I like the simple life, reminds me of my childhood in the Old South. My wife is more frugal than I and just beams when she finds a nice dress for a hundred bath. I support most of the family expenses of my wife, her sister, her sisters two children, and their mother, and do it all for less than 15,000 a month--- I put money in the bank every month. My wife and her sister work, make about 150 baht a day. I tell them they don't have to do, but they like to "hold up their end" and just don't like to sit and not do something useful.

But about village life-- I guess the only things that I have problems with is yes, those dam_n loudspeakers, I live a little too close to one, I am the only farang in the village and my Thai is not coming along as well as I hoped, I sometimes feel like the village idiot or deaf mute.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about Issan Farmers number 3 at your place in Feb. I'll be there.( I drink anything) even fermented floodwater as long as it's over 5%

village life is not for me ,

3 days in teelaks mare BARN ,

and im going up the wall / up the totem pole , with boredom.

all depends on what you drink , lao cow helps .

horses for courses .

:jap:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's interesting to note the different reactions and comments in threads such as this. Reading between the lines it appears that the majority of farangs living in Thai villages are blessed with monetary good fortune which allows them choose a particular lifestyle. And why not indeed? On the other hand I feel that many resident farangs rarely put a point of view highlighting the other side of the coin – like mine; ie: – living on a tight budget. I remember reading a post a couple of years ago from one such chap who even published his annual budget on the forum – split right down into precise baht amounts on a daily basis for every item of expenditure! Okay over the top maybe, but certainly confirms many falangs do indeed live very simple lives happily. Then, conversely to opinions expressed here about not wanting to meet or mix with other expats, one often sees announcements from guys seeking drinking companions who speak English to break their boredom. I wonder how many chaps in the not-so-well- off group would jump at the chance to meet and chat with similar without feeling embarrassed over worrying about getting into expensive rounds in a bar? Maybe there's room for thought for a 'Only Surviving But Happy' club who could organize cheap and cheerful meet-ups, members contributing a little bit to a kitty? Problem would almost certainly be travelling to and from the appointed places though! Mm – only a thought that's very unlikely to appeal – or work.

I'd join your club. I see the " with only that amount of income, you shouldn't be living here" posts all the time. I guess I could live on the streets of America. I like the simple life, reminds me of my childhood in the Old South. My wife is more frugal than I and just beams when she finds a nice dress for a hundred bath. I support most of the family expenses of my wife, her sister, her sisters two children, and their mother, and do it all for less than 15,000 a month--- I put money in the bank every month. My wife and her sister work, make about 150 baht a day. I tell them they don't have to do, but they like to "hold up their end" and just don't like to sit and not do something useful.

But about village life-- I guess the only things that I have problems with is yes, those dam_n loudspeakers, I live a little too close to one, I am the only farang in the village and my Thai is not coming along as well as I hoped, I sometimes feel like the village idiot or deaf mute.

Nice one, Bunnydrops! My thought about a "club" was only made as a joke of course, because it'd be almost impossible to get it to work. But I think it's good to share stories like this. Best wishes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...