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SimonD

Village Life Experiences

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Yes I did get it !! As Thadeus indicated often the only way to shut someone up is with an obtuse reply.

What's wrong with free speech ? Still never produced that link did you Chi ?

If you're going to make a statement make sure you back it up with facts. Thank you.

Yes you were right Thad....

Would you like a 50 page report Pal ??

Dont be such an arsehol_e. Thailand was TOTALLY different before the tribes arrived, linked without question to the emergence of the net. If you cant see and view that, than no one can help you...

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Say no more! Your future happiness is assured. I used to bank at Lloyds years ago. Didn't thay used to have a white horse in their logo - or was that another Brit bank?

I think you are confusing your banks with your whiskies ! :rolleyes:

You are half right Lloyds had a prancing Black Horse the scotch was White Horse

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Yes I did get it !! As Thadeus indicated often the only way to shut someone up is with an obtuse reply.

What's wrong with free speech ? Still never produced that link did you Chi ?

If you're going to make a statement make sure you back it up with facts. Thank you.

Yes you were right Thad....

Would you like a 50 page report Pal ??

Dont be such an arsehol_e. Thailand was TOTALLY different before the tribes arrived, linked without question to the emergence of the net. If you cant see and view that, than no one can help you...

It's very obvious that a lot of members here hide behind their avatars and chosen logon names to hurl insult, disrupt otherwise decent conversations and for the main part display contempt, disregard and plain don't-give-a-dam_n attitude. No wonder many long-term members seldom bother to post anything.

Edited by Jezz

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It's very obvious that a lot of members here hide behind their avatars and chosen logon names to hurl insult, disrupt otherwise decent conversations and for the main part display contempt, disregard and plain don't-give-a-dam_n attitude. No wonder many long-term members seldom bother to post anything.

Surely Jezz, only an arsehol_e would do a thing like that ?

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Yes I did get it !! As Thadeus indicated often the only way to shut someone up is with an obtuse reply.

What's wrong with free speech ? Still never produced that link did you Chi ?

If you're going to make a statement make sure you back it up with facts. Thank you.

Yes you were right Thad....

Would you like a 50 page report Pal ??

Dont be such an arsehol_e. Thailand was TOTALLY different before the tribes arrived, linked without question to the emergence of the net. If you cant see and view that, than no one can help you...

Sorry Chivas but your response is not so Regal

Your original post was eronious on a couple of points. What you claimed was an opinion and not a fact. Also when when you state "thailand was a far better place"

Who do you mean? Better for who? Falangs or Thais.

In future, when you make sweeping statements, state that it is your opinion but recognise the fact that others may hold a different view and are just as entitled as you are to their opinions

I'm trying to be constructive

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It's very obvious that a lot of members here hide behind their avatars and chosen logon names to hurl insult, disrupt otherwise decent conversations and for the main part display contempt, disregard and plain don't-give-a-dam_n attitude. No wonder many long-term members seldom bother to post anything.

Surely Jezz, only an arsehol_e would do a thing like that ?

To put it another way, if a group of guys enjoyed banter and good conversation in a particular bar, but were often interrupted by blokes hell-bent to break up the rapport , the group would pretty quickly find a new rendezvous. The upside of forums like this is, you can carry on without the need to move on.

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It's very obvious that a lot of members here hide behind their avatars and chosen logon names to hurl insult, disrupt otherwise decent conversations and for the main part display contempt, disregard and plain don't-give-a-dam_n attitude. No wonder many long-term members seldom bother to post anything.

Surely Jezz, only an arsehol_e would do a thing like that ?

To put it another way, if a group of guys enjoyed banter and good conversation in a particular bar, but were often interrupted by blokes hell-bent to break up the rapport , the group would pretty quickly find a new rendezvous. The upside of forums like this is, you can carry on without the need to move on.

In the bars I have frequented the 'group' would <deleted> the offender and HE would move on :)

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Uh Oh, this is going the way of so many other threads on the general forum.:rolleyes:

As the OP, I would kindly request that we keep this discussion on topic :) . It is entitled 'Village Life Experiences' and that is all it is about. I did NOT intend it to be a thread to sling mud or make unvalidated comments. That is why it was posted here, on the Isaan forum, in particular. Anybody who has an axe to grind could do it via PM, not in public.

It was going so well and I have learned a great deal from the many positive contributions made here and would like to keep it that way. The whole reason I joined the Thai Visa forum was that it appeared to demonstre a level of maturity that was sorely lacking elsewhere.

Thank you, gentlemen, for your replies,

Simon

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We could start a "Village Life Thread Preservation Society "

Thank you Mr Davis .

Edited by onionluke

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Hi Simon,

I followed and commented on your recent post about loudspeaker towers in villages. Your subsequent comments made more sense and explained your reasoning for considering village life.

These are my own thoughts on the subject:

Q) Why am I living in an Isaan village?

A) I first came to Thailand in 2005, then aged 61, divorced, redundant with little money, no property or assets in the UK. In other words, just about down and out. My only lifeline hung on a single remaining endowment policy which had been hammered into the ground and would only return about one-and-a-half million baht on maturity in 2009. I managed to get a job in Pattaya with a holiday company – legally with a work permit – lived in a small rented apartment in Jomtien, earned a bit of money, played the field with bar girls, moved to the company's Phuket office during 2006, played the field with Phuket bar girls then went off to work in Bali for a few months.

In 2007 I moved to Koh Samui, worked for the original company and one night met a girl from Isaan who had just that day arrived on the island intending to work in a bar for the first time. I went to that bar every night for a week or so and kept her boss happy by spending a bit of money over the bar whilst enjoying the company of his latest recruit, so she never left the premises with any other falang. She never drank alcohol or smoked. (Still doesn't to this day, apart from maybe two bottles of Spy a year!) A while later she left the bar and moved into my rented house. At the end of 2008 we went to Phuket where I worked until the end of that year, when the job was no longer available. I hadn't saved any money because the income just covered rent and living expenses

Our relationship continued to be excellent; no expectancy or demands for money because she knew I hadn't got any! After a lot of thought and discussion I decided the best route would be to move to her village, wait for my one-and-a-half million baht insurance maturity, then spend some of it converting her parent's house on stilts to incorporate a new modern house underneath. The remaining cash would need to stay in the Thai bank in order to qualify for 'Extension Based on Marriage'. We lived up in the old house with her mama, papa and her two young sons for a year until the new house below had been completed. By that time I qualified to receive the British state pension, enhanced with extra sums from SERPS and Graduated Benefits (a left over benefit system entitled to from previous years)

We married legally in Bangkok in 2009 so my pension is topped up with Wife Benefit (which can no longer be applied for and ends in 2020!) The grand total monthly income is a very modest amount that many farangs would gasp at and cry, 'How on Earth do you manage to survive?" Which leads to the next question.

Q) How do I survive in the village?

A) I've always preferred country life. I'm fortunate to have a Thai family who are totally unobtrusive – even the year spent living together in the old upstairs house wasn't a problem – believe it or not. Now, Mama and Papa live upstairs, myself, the wife and two boys live in the modern air-conditioned house below. The parents or any other visiting family members never encroach on our space, in fact even when invited to join us they prefer to visit ma and pa via the outside back steps leading upstairs, or once in a while sit in the shade under our front porch. It's all very civilized and workable. The total cost to convert the house was no more than I would have spent on rent in places like Pattaya or the islands in just three years. Yes, If I could afford to live down south I would quite enjoy somewhere like Samui with nice beaches, but can live without the sea.

Our lifestyle is simple. Now approaching my 68th birthday I'm quite content with a routine of early morning walks along the quiet soi, (we're on the edge of the village) or down by the river that runs at the back of the house and through nearby temples with beautiful grounds. A potter in the garden, a few hours online, or watching my favorite movies and British TV shows, or writing fiction and screenplays (I did have a novel published last year as an eBook and completed a screenplay, neither likely to make money or get noticed, so please don't ask!) Sometimes a motorbike ride to the small town a couple of kilometers away, visiting the market and 7-eleven, a monthly trip by public transport to the city for supermarket shopping. And of course a few beers or something later in the day at home. Because the villagers know I'm not a rich falang, the men never scrounge beer or whiskey from me, although occasionally I ask neighbors to share a beer with me. I'm the only falang in the village; I do miss good English conversation sometimes, but wouldn't want the life spent around guzzling in bars in town too often even if it was affordable.

My wife helps out on the family farm and runs the domestic things at home. Hopefully we'll have a little money saved to take the kids for a holiday to the coast next year. It'll be a bus trip to keep the cost down.

Jezz, good on you.. great post. Nice to read posts from folks who have achieved happiness and contentment without the need for huge amounts of money or rather the dependancy on large amounts of money

This is good to read and somewhat falls into the chicken soup for the soul category.

Thanks for sharing, really pleased for you and that you have made it work.

Monty

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We could start a "Village Life Thread Preservation Society "

Thank you Mr Davis .

So, you profess to know who I am? Well, you got the first letter right but then so could a two-year old as it's in my username.

Your reply is typical of the negative ones most posters here are referring to.

Check your PM's.

Simon

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We could start a "Village Life Thread Preservation Society "

Thank you Mr Davis .

So, you profess to know who I am? Well, you got the first letter right but then so could a two-year old as it's in my username.

Your reply is typical of the negative ones most posters here are referring to.

Check your PM's.

Simon

Simon , no offence or negativity intended , a mere pun without profession to your good self . I was thanking a certain Mr Ray Davis for his insight and honesty and great songs . The Village Green Preservation Society was the name of The Kinks album portraying a changing England . A thread in the making - What is changing in the village you live in ? Is it for the better or worse ? Opinions anecdotes and so on .

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We could start a "Village Life Thread Preservation Society "

Thank you Mr Davis .

So, you profess to know who I am? Well, you got the first letter right but then so could a two-year old as it's in my username.

Your reply is typical of the negative ones most posters here are referring to.

Check your PM's.

Simon

Simon , no offence or negativity intended , a mere pun without profession to your good self . I was thanking a certain Mr Ray Davis for his insight and honesty and great songs . The Village Green Preservation Society was the name of The Kinks album portraying a changing England . A thread in the making - What is changing in the village you live in ? Is it for the better or worse ? Opinions anecdotes and so on .

My apologies.:jap:

Simon.

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Plenty of abuse against me but absolutely nothing of substance ??

Guys SOMETIMES you need to stand up for yourselves ?? Nobody gets banned for hopefully making your/my point ??

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The Mosquito Patrol.

Another ‘Real Village Life Experience’ I find intriguing is ‘The Mosquito Patrol’.

Periodically, a platoon of mosquito combatants patrols the village. This is made up of somebody carrying a bundle of pink forms, somebody else holding a pencil, another clutching a clipboard, and yet another team member holding a large electric torch. They move stealthily among the clusters of houses, flashing the torch in nooks and crannies under stilt houses - many of which are home to buffalo, cows, ducks, cockerels, chickens, cats, dogs - inspecting the area for signs of anything that might encourage mosquitoes. After the inspection a pink form is pasted somewhere on the front of the house, a column duly filled in and dated as proof of inspection and compliance. The trouble is the first soaking with rain, gust of wind or fading due to sunlight and they hang in shreds awaiting the next patrol, which dutifully peers at the paper shreds as though the information is still decipherable and make notes accordingly.

Working bravely alone, the spray man follows with a motorized gadget that produces alarming clouds of choking fumes, vapor and smoke that beats inhaling emissions from twenty trucks and twenty buses, and without so much as a facemask the sprayer walks up and down, between houses spreading his deadly cloud. Not surprisingly, the next day there comes stories of at least one villager who had to be rushed to hospital with breathing problems.

As soon as I hear his lethal weapon start up in our location on the edge of the village I slam the doors and windows shut and tie a handkerchief round my mouth, waiting for the ‘all clear’ to sound!

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