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It's All In Your Mind!

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...and I managed it to STOP smoking from one to the other day. How? I just believed in myself! It's that easy!

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Fully agree. Stopping smoking was easy for me once I had decided I actually wanted to stop. I used to smoke between 2-3 packs a day. Benson and Hedges only. At the time they were around 5 pounds a pack. I used to do a lot of driving in my job, around 1000-1100 miles a week. I was on my way home Friday afternoon and had pulled into the service station to fill up and get my 3rd pack of the day. As I was filling the car a guy rode in on a new Yamaha R1. It looked beautiful. It then hit me that if I didn't smoke I could have one.I was actually spending more on smokes than I was on my mortgage.

Tthat,s exactly what I did. I didn't get that 3rd pack and the next day went to the local Yamaha shop and got myself an R1. I never had another cigarette since and know that I never will. even in times of high stress and heartache I have never had the urge to have another cigarette. It was the best thing I ever did even though I used to enjoy smoking.

As said all it takes is for you to REALLY want to stop. Once you7 do it is the easiest thing in the world.

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It was the same for me. Stopped cold turkey after decicding no longer to smoke . I smoked for 33 year about 30 cigs a day. The first week I even had an open packet of LM Light in home. I am a happy non-smker for 2,5 years now and it was one of the best decisions I ever made.

Edited by hanuman2543

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Stopping cold turkey is the best method - I agree 100%.

If you need help, read the book "Allen Carr's Easyway To Stop Smoking".

I did it after many years of smoking.

VERY TRUE...

"As said all it takes is for you to REALLY want to stop. Once you do it is the easiest thing in the world".

Edited by ravip
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Ihave read that book at least 3 times and tried to quit afterwards, but I have failed every time.

It's really depressing to keep on failingsad.png

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Ihave read that book at least 3 times and tried to quit afterwards, but I have failed every time.

It's really depressing to keep on failingsad.png

Keep trying mate. Its worth it. The book works but only if you have made a commitment to yourself to stop. You have to really want to.

Its 90% in the mind. Physical withdrawel is negligable. Good luck

PS. Spurs really have to beat Reading on sunday!

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It is all about WILLPOWER. I used to smoke 40 a day, then after having a really bad cough I decided to give up. I had only just bougt two pack of Malboro Lights on the way home from work. I left one pack in the car and one pack on the kitchen table, both unopened. The willpower involved in not opening either pack was huge and I challenged myself not to open either pack. It worked and I soon felt better both healthwise and financially! That was about 10 years ago when 20 cigarettes cost £ 3.00. I am not sure exactly how much a pack of 20 costs now but if they are £ 5.00 or £ 6.00 in the UK you would save at least £ 3,650.00 a year if you were smoking 40 a day!!

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Nocotine is physically addictive and people vary enormously in their susceptibility to its addictive prioperties.

The physical act of smoking can be pyschologically addictive, which is one reason why people whio quit often put on weight -- they substitute one tension relieving oral habit with another.

I think it is important to respect individual differences and not assume that what was true in your particular case is true in all. There are people who suffer agonizing physical withdrawal when trying to quit smoking. I did not, but that doesn't mean I had more will power than anyone else. I was just a whole lot luckier in my physiology. I certainly know people who have gone through sheer hell trying to stop, and it wasn't for lack of character of "will power".

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Nocotine is physically addictive and people vary enormously in their susceptibility to its addictive prioperties.

The physical act of smoking can be pyschologically addictive, which is one reason why people whio quit often put on weight -- they substitute one tension relieving oral habit with another.

I think it is important to respect individual differences and not assume that what was true in your particular case is true in all. There are people who suffer agonizing physical withdrawal when trying to quit smoking. I did not, but that doesn't mean I had more will power than anyone else. I was just a whole lot luckier in my physiology. I certainly know people who have gone through sheer hell trying to stop, and it wasn't for lack of character of "will power".

Thats interesting, i didn't know that physical withdrawel differed from person to person.

I certainly don't doubt you Sheryl but were you aware that this is one of the most powerful bullet points that Allen Carr's method hammers into you, that the physical pain of withdrawel is almost negligable! His point is that the so called pain is cleverly drummed into you by forces happier to see you remain smoking

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Nocotine is physically addictive and people vary enormously in their susceptibility to its addictive prioperties.

The physical act of smoking can be pyschologically addictive, which is one reason why people whio quit often put on weight -- they substitute one tension relieving oral habit with another.

I think it is important to respect individual differences and not assume that what was true in your particular case is true in all. There are people who suffer agonizing physical withdrawal when trying to quit smoking. I did not, but that doesn't mean I had more will power than anyone else. I was just a whole lot luckier in my physiology. I certainly know people who have gone through sheer hell trying to stop, and it wasn't for lack of character of "will power".

Thats interesting, i didn't know that physical withdrawel differed from person to person.

I certainly don't doubt you Sheryl but were you aware that this is one of the most powerful bullet points that Allen Carr's method hammers into you, that the physical pain of withdrawel is almost negligable! His point is that the so called pain is cleverly drummed into you by forces happier to see you remain smoking

Must admit I haven't read the book. I just went cold turkey and have taken every minute and hour at a time. At first I didn't even tell myself I was quitting, that would have been too daunting. I just kept on telling myself I was seeing how long I could go in between my next one. Only now after more than 9 weeks am I daring to even think that I may have quit and will never have one again.

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Ihave read that book at least 3 times and tried to quit afterwards, but I have failed every time.

It's really depressing to keep on failingsad.png

ThaiPauly like you I read the book believed it and thought I was the failure but someone once

told me don't stop stopping and I kept thinking of that and also read a more up to date book

free on Kindle called The Book on Quitting Smoking by Diane Barnes, this hit home. I will be

able to do it this time as I want to stop because I've been told it's making me very ill. I had

hoped in the past I could stop before being told to but it would have been easier had I made

up my mind that I was stopping because I wanted to stop as some of the other posters have

said. Good Luck tell yourself you won't fail and I don't think you will. I know this time I'll win.

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I gave up 25 years ago and started up again. Me, happy with my choice, why, cos perhaps l don't care. Life is for doing what you want until you expire. Folk might say your not thinking about your loved ones if you croke. I say they do stuff that may shorten their life too, up to them, l/them/we don't want to be locked in a cupboard and live to be 100 unsatisfied, do your stuff, l am. smile.png

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I gave up 25 years ago and started up again. Me, happy with my choice, why, cos perhaps l don't care. Life is for doing what you want until you expire. Folk might say your not thinking about your loved ones if you croke. I say they do stuff that may shorten their life too, up to them, l/them/we don't want to be locked in a cupboard and live to be 100 unsatisfied, do your stuff, l am. smile.png

Thats all very well and thats your choice but this forum is about those who WANT to stop smokingbiggrin.png

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I gave up 25 years ago and started up again. Me, happy with my choice, why, cos perhaps l don't care. Life is for doing what you want until you expire. Folk might say your not thinking about your loved ones if you croke. I say they do stuff that may shorten their life too, up to them, l/them/we don't want to be locked in a cupboard and live to be 100 unsatisfied, do your stuff, l am. smile.png

Thats all very well and thats your choice but this forum is about those who WANT to stop smokingbiggrin.png

Ooooooooooooop's, sorry. smile.png

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Yep, quitting was easy I did it at least 30 times, this time it's kind of sticking but I did slip up a few times in the past 5 months. I know I am no longer physically addicted to nicotine but I get strong cravings to smoke, I do enjoy it and the only thing keeping me from going back to it is my skin feels better, my face isn't greasy, my teeth are white for the first time that I can remember and I don't wake up with that nasty taste in my mouth like someone took a dump. I also consider my children who are young because my wife and I got started late in life and we would like to be around for them. I do feel better when I don't smoke and I tend to eat more healthy and do not drink when I do not smoke so, it's one of those things you need to take moment by moment not day by day. I don't know how much of it is in your mind and how much of it actually becomes part of you, I smoked for 3/4 of my life so not smoking is just odd.

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