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It's All In Your Mind!

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Nocotine is physically addictive and people vary enormously in their susceptibility to its addictive prioperties.

The physical act of smoking can be pyschologically addictive, which is one reason why people whio quit often put on weight -- they substitute one tension relieving oral habit with another.

I think it is important to respect individual differences and not assume that what was true in your particular case is true in all. There are people who suffer agonizing physical withdrawal when trying to quit smoking. I did not, but that doesn't mean I had more will power than anyone else. I was just a whole lot luckier in my physiology. I certainly know people who have gone through sheer hell trying to stop, and it wasn't for lack of character of "will power".

Many years ago(about 22) I quit a 40 day(B&H) habit very easily. I was practising meditation and the 'guru' told me it was all in the mind so I stopped very easily with no withdrawal symptoms.

Recently, I've been trying to quit again and it it MUCH harder. Is it 'willpower' ? Depends if you thing addiction is a disease. Willpower cannot cure a disease.

Anyways, it is much harder now but that could be because it's all in my mind.

I found it beneficial to be accountable to someone - I wrote to a friend saying the day I was quitting.

Today is my 3rd day smoke-free and as Johnny Cash says, "every day get better than the day before"

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3 weeks and feeling good - I really felt like a cigar late last night but didn't have one.

Can anyone suggest ways not to have a 'slip'?

Any good threads on staying quit?

Thanks

NN

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3 weeks and feeling good - I really felt like a cigar late last night but didn't have one.

Can anyone suggest ways not to have a 'slip'?

Any good threads on staying quit?

I'm 15 weeks clean today and feeling good too Neeranam. I've also fancied the odd ciggie or cigar but resisted and after 5-10 minutes of resistence, totally forgot about wanting one. I think fighting off the urge is the only way.

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I don't know that it's all in your mind, but if you have made over the worst part of the addictive process, when you get a rather sudden urge, it helps to take a very deep breath, then exhale completely, almost until your lungs hurt from all the air being out, then take a very deep breath and hold it. Repeat if necessary a few times. There's something that helps about that contraction and expansion of the lungs that simulates some of the physical side of smoking.

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I don't know the mysteries (to me) of nicotine. Allen Carr's book convinced me that it was more mental than physical, but maybe the drug does the mental thing too. I just don't know. I agree every one is different, too.

A tiny thing mentioned by Carr convinced me that much was in my mind about a cigarette being my "friend," something I didn't want to lose. I saw that when I was smoking, I smoked about one per hour m/l, and if I went for about 4-5 hours I got real cravings and felt some kind of withdrawal.

But he made the point that when I'm sleeping that doesn't happen. I didn't wake up after 8 or 10 hours in withdrawal. I felt fine. The first thing I'd do is go P and then I'd make coffee. I'd make the coffee before having my first smoke so it could be brewing and my other "friend" would be ready. Only then would I go outside for my first smoke of the day but I was.not.sick. So Carr's point about this was that if I got sick from withdrawal only when I was awake, but never when asleep, then part of it had to be mental - conscious.

Chantix wasn't an option then so I had to just quit. I did it by believing Carr's statement that deep down I saw the cig as a friend, when in fact it was totally my enemy. I rejected that enemy, no longer saw a friend, and quit.

Another thing he reassured me with was the the carbon monoxide was gone in 8 hours, and the nicotine in 72 hours. After that there was still some withdrawal as the system sought a balance from the peaks and valleys of smoking each cig, but once I saw an enemy it was easier.

Today I'd want to try Chantix to assure that I didn't want to smoke at any time, but at the time I didn't need it because my mind was made up. In a weak moment I might well have fallen off the wagon, so again I think I'd also use Chantix. Hell, I'd let them lock me in a rubber room if I had to. Those cigs are nasty dirty unhealthful and expensive little items.

Congrats to all who quit and to those who will, congrats.

Edited by NeverSure
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3 weeks and feeling good - I really felt like a cigar late last night but didn't have one.

Can anyone suggest ways not to have a 'slip'?

Any good threads on staying quit?

Thanks

NN

"There is no ways to have a slip" my past efforts of giving up smoking,have been broken because I thought I'm safe now so I will celebrate with a cigarette. Just like Alchoholics we can never have that one!

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3 weeks and feeling good - I really felt like a cigar late last night but didn't have one.

Can anyone suggest ways not to have a 'slip'?

Any good threads on staying quit?

Thanks

NN

Congratulations, you're doing great!!! I think the first 3 weeks is definitely the hardest time - staying quit gets easier as time goes by. At 3 weeks you are likely to get cravings fairly often. After 6 weeks I found cravings were much less, and after 3 months whole days went by when I didn't think about cigarettes.

But I'm still very wary of the power of nicotine, and have occasional desires to have just one cigarette. I probably will have these minor cravings for the rest of my life, although they are not nearly as uncomfortable as the cravings of early days. And as a few fellow ex-addicts have said, "you're a puff away from a pack a day". Just don't do it, no matter how tempting.

95% of what I do is 100% legal.

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