Jump to content
BANGKOK
Sign in to follow this  
lonexpat

3Rd Teacher Waiver Refusal

Recommended Posts

What qualified teacher is going to teach in a government school, 60 kids per class, getting paid 30k a month?

Can anyone answer that question?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What qualified teacher is going to teach in a government school, 60 kids per class, getting paid 30k a month?

Can anyone answer that question?

There are some but they are rarer than chicken's teeth! So the next best thing is a native speaker that wants to teach, enjoys teaching, cares about their students, is good at teaching and getting better with experience but the TCT are forcing many of these teachers out of Thailand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr Trout, can you please be more specific? What do you mean when you say 'get qualified'? Would you like the OP, and all the other foreign teachers in Thailand, to be a qualified teacher in their home country?

What I mean is that you should have the proper credentials to receive a work permit as per the governing body issuing them. I am under the impression that only the int. schools require you to be a teacher in your home country, so if you don't work in one then no, you don't need western teaching credentials. I don't know what the criteria is to teach in a Thai school, or govt school etc., but whatever it is, if you want to teach there then you should have the necessary documents.

I am under the impression that waivers are given so that the teacher has time to get the necessary credentials or do the coursework etc., not a permanent lifting of requirements.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's try and stay on the topic.

We can argue the point, but the TC is probably here to stay and like a lot of bureaucratic agencies, it's not likely to make things easier. There job is (in theory) to insure a certain standard in the field of education. I don't know that they are overly concerned about the economics or number of teachers.

In the meantime, the best thing that most people can do who wish to remain here and work here in teaching is to start getting themselves qualified. If that means weekend classes or on-line courses, then that is what you should be doing.

If you have a degree, you need to 'upgrade' to the credits necessary for an education major. If not, then there is a lot longer period of time required.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kilgore Trout. Charles Dickens didn"t have a degree in English literature, does that mean he couldn"t write? Not being a qualified English teacher obviously means there are many areas of teaching and child psychology which I don"t understand. As Skybluestu pointed out I was employed as an EFL teacher. Having done a tefl course and a Thai language course I was perfectly qualified at the time.

Dickens's approach to writing was one of weekly or monthly instalments. He had the benefit of a number of talented editors who would proof read, offer suggestions and in some cases modify his writing. The most famous of the editors was John Forster. Mr. Forster is famous for his time as secretary to the Lunacy Commission and,then as Commissioner in Lunacy.

The reference to lunancy is appropriate with the tangent on Dickens. also I finally get to make mention of this piece of trivia that I have been carrying around for decades. As a tip to english teachers, this should bring a laugh to a class.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...

Of course there are those with natural ability who lack the proper credentials, what you are forgetting is how important having the proper background and training is.

Look at it from a parent's perspective; do you expect parents to accept the fact that the teacher teaching their children is not qualified?

Would you fly in an airplane with a pilot who doesn't have a licence but everyone "says" he is a great pilot; "don't worry about it; you will be fine"unsure.png

Natural ability and aptitude is great but teachers also need to be properly trained, and of course there are those who are trained and don't do their job well; I'm not denying that.

For those of you who are good teachers but not qualified; you would be surprised at how proper training would improve your skills and if you are really dedicated then you will do what is necessary to get qualified.

Teaching is an art and a science; even if you are naturally good at the "art" you still need the knowledge and experience with regard to the "science."

Bottom line; if you want to teach in Thailand then you need to get qualified. If you don't; ride as long as you can but don't complain about not being allowed a work permit if by law you are not qualified to get one.

I understand where you are coming from, but your pilot analogy is flawed. To convert it into the Thai situation, it should be altered as follows:

You are in a commercial jet where the pilot and copilot have both suddenly died of heart attacks. For now your altitude is stable but going steadily towards auguring into the ground. The flight attendant makes an announcement: "is anyone here a commercial pilot?!" Out of the passengers, nobody stands up. From there, the flight attendant needs to rethink her standards, and ask "is anyone here a civilian pilot?", or "has anyone ever taken any flight lessons whatsoever?", on down to "has anyone ever played a flight simulator game"?

Maybe Bangkok and some of the more populated and popular provinces can afford to demand commercial pilots / 100% to-the-letter qualified teachers. A whole bunch of other places here cannot afford to be so picky. In many cases, a motivated yet completely "unqualified" and/or unexperienced foreigner can do a fine job, particularly if they are paired with a qualified and motivated Thai teacher to show them the ropes, set lesson plans, etc.

What will the de-facto result of the TCT's rules actually pan out to be, assuming that they are fully enforced? First, the great majority of schools in moderate or rural provinces will end up with NO foreign teachers. Just like your average rural country school now. Maybe that is OK, but I tend to think that such a result wouldn't improve the overall quality of English education here, quite likely the opposite.

Second, for any school that DOES manage to keep some foreign teachers other than an international school or full English Program school, their foreign teaching staff will be made up entirely of revolving-door backpackers and converted tourists. Turnover rates are pretty massive now, but enforcing this will push it higher still. The folks like the OP and myself who sort of fall into teaching but then "catch the bug" and actually take it pretty seriously and try to do a good job will be kicked out in favor of backpackers on a fresh "temporary" TL. I've met a lot of fresh new 1st year foreign teachers in my 5 years here. Some of them pan out and turn into good quality, motivated teachers -- but a whole lot are here for 1 year of drinking, chasing skirts, and hungover "teaching" before moving on to their next destination. I can fully understand wanting to limit the presence and impact of that second group on the education system here, but I think that these TCT rules are unfortunately going to have the opposite effect over time.

Maybe I'm wrong, and I bow to the wisdom of those that have been here longer than I have and/or have a real background in teaching (I do have a Bachelor's Degree, but it is in Computer Science), but I feel like the TCT rules here are likely going to make things worse before they get better. Just my two cents.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What will the de-facto result of the TCT's rules actually pan out to be, assuming that they are fully enforced? First, the great majority of schools in moderate or rural provinces will end up with NO foreign teachers. Just like your average rural country school now. Maybe that is OK, but I tend to think that such a result wouldn't improve the overall quality of English education here, quite likely the opposite.

Second, for any school that DOES manage to keep some foreign teachers other than an international school or full English Program school, their foreign teaching staff will be made up entirely of revolving-door backpackers and converted tourists. Turnover rates are pretty massive now, but enforcing this will push it higher still. The folks like the OP and myself who sort of fall into teaching but then "catch the bug" and actually take it pretty seriously and try to do a good job will be kicked out in favor of backpackers on a fresh "temporary" TL. I've met a lot of fresh new 1st year foreign teachers in my 5 years here. Some of them pan out and turn into good quality, motivated teachers -- but a whole lot are here for 1 year of drinking, chasing skirts, and hungover "teaching" before moving on to their next destination. I can fully understand wanting to limit the presence and impact of that second group on the education system here, but I think that these TCT rules are unfortunately going to have the opposite effect over time.

Maybe I'm wrong, and I bow to the wisdom of those that have been here longer than I have and/or have a real background in teaching (I do have a Bachelor's Degree, but it is in Computer Science), but I feel like the TCT rules here are likely going to make things worse before they get better. Just my two cents.

I agree with you milkboy, but thats Thailand. It has always seemed to me that the rules in Thailand are set up and unenforced so that they can arbitrarily enforce them to get rid of people they don't like.

I think though, that teaching without proper credentials, or teaching in most Thai schools for that matter, is something you can only do for so long.....if you are in it for the long run then I think there's no question; you have to find a way to get qualified and get stable job in a good work environment.

I started out with just a ba teaching in a Thai school, then did the language school thing, eventually taking the coursework to get qualified and went back to my home country for a couple of years for the practicum, testing and experience etc. It was tough and I busted my arse doing it, but it was worth it in the end.

Bottom line is; "it is what it is."

Edited by Kilgore Trout

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are correct, it is what it is. Or to elude to your forum name, perhaps I should say "...so it goes".

To my own personal standards, I consider myself qualified to teach. I say that with essentially no caveats, but if I allow some minor rationalization in addition then I am 99% certain that if I were to be kicked out of the teaching profession here I would not be replaced by someone any more qualified than myself... Those that are more qualified are either going to want more money (fair enough) or a level of standards that just isn't present here. I've known a few fully-qualified people with M.Ed degrees here, and in my experience they get burnt out with the poor standards and wacky situations faster than the "motivated amatuers". YMMV, and that isn't to take away anything from the good, patient, fully qualified people here or those like yourself that went back home to get fully legit teaching degree -- /salute to you by the way, I think that is admirable.

We'll see what happens!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...