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'real' Bread In The Provinces


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I am out in the sticks, and happy to eat whatever is on offer, except for my breakfast first thing in the morning. :D

There is one single brand of bread (the spongy, white variety), which is, ehh, not as sweet as the other bright-coloured bakery products... :o

It's sort of alright in a sandwhich maker with tinned mackerel or processed cheese and tomatoes, but it's not something I want to eat every day for the rest of my life...

Yeah, I know... :D , I do eat rice-soup for breakfast, just aiming at some variety.

I've made some satisfying pasties with "Kao Sali" :D , but I wonder if anyone has experience with baking bread themselves?

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Had a friend back home that used to do it but maybe you wouldn't call it "do it yourself" in that it used a fully automatic breadmaker. Would love to get my hands on one here.

Just put the mix in, it mixes, needs, and bakes it automatically.

post-566-1134043437.jpg

Edited by tywais
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zzap

Some tips and advise:

In search of your unsweetened bread,search for a shop in your area selling "moo satay" or look for milk shops.They will both have bread on display which looks like an open top loaf of bread.

These breads are (most of the time) unsweetened since they get toasted and topped with sweetened condensed milk or green custard.You will not find this kind of bread in mini marts ,but may 'be you have a chance to find them on markets.

If you want to make your own bread,I suggest that you buy your whole meal,whole wheat or rye in a Lotus ,Villa Market or Foodland when on a trip to BKK. Mix the wholemeal or rye or whatever you use with 1 part bread flour and 1 part all-purpose flour to get a nice home made delicious bread!

Good Luck

Bangkok baker :o

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i baked the bread at mom's home .. unluckily ..old yeast

my bread was rejectted by diggie..they were not interested ...make me more upset and thrown the bread :o

dogs had broken head :D

my bread was hard as rock or diamond

bambi :D:D

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I was in the Emporium on Sukhumvit road in Bangkok a couple of weeks ago and they had a breadmaker there for around 5,000 baht.

They also sell bread flour.

I was curious but running short of time and I have no idea how they work.

If anyone knows can they please explain it and maybe I will get one on my next trip.

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I was in the Emporium on Sukhumvit road in Bangkok a couple of weeks ago and they had a breadmaker there for around 5,000 baht.

They also sell bread flour.

I was curious but running short of time and I have no idea how they work.

If anyone knows can they please explain it and maybe I will get one on my next trip.

It's quite simple, they are doing what your hands would do but in a controlled environment. You put in all the ingredients set the machine, for example they have different settings for different types of bread, and leave it to do it's job! The loaves are often a bit of a strange spape but the bread is excellent.

Personally I prefer to use the old fashioned method, I think the kneading is great fun!

One real advantage of a bread making machine is that you can set it on a timer and wake up to freshly baked warm bread - yummy!

Edited by suegha
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My wife makes bread occasionaly, and we gan get all the stuff localy although we have to go into town (Nakorn Sawan or Chainat) to get it. I'm out in the sticks but can still find bread, usually eat the wholeweat one, if you have a 7-11 nearbye just go and talk to them about stocking it, our local one (about 10 km away) carries a range of bread and even stockes ham, bacon and butter , mainly cos I buy it off them....had no luck with then stocking cheese yet though.

RC

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Bought a bread making machine over from the UK.

Just chuck the ingrediants in, set the timer and you have the smell

of fresh bread waking you up every morning.

I live in the sticks and the ingrediant are easy to get hold of.

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zzap Do you have an oven? If so, all you need is flour, water, salt and yeast (maybe a little honey to wake up the yeast). All of these ingredients are available in my local (Bangkok) Foodland.

Note that appliances like bread machines have local power requirements. So a machine purchased in the U.S.A. would require 115/60 AC power, and if brought to Thailand would be cooked before your first loaf unless you use a transformer/converter. So if you want a bread machine buy it here or in a 220/50 country.

Personally I wouldn't ever use a bread-making machine as making and baking is so much fun and satisfying. However, without an oven, or even with an oven but not wanting even more heat generated in your house, and a strong desire for bread, I can see where a machine would be a welcome addition.

I can get decent baked bread here but I really miss a good bagel. (I ate six on a two-day trip to the U.S.A. last week!)

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I was in the Emporium on Sukhumvit road in Bangkok a couple of weeks ago and they had a breadmaker there for around 5,000 baht.

They also sell bread flour.

I was curious but running short of time and I have no idea how they work.

If anyone knows can they please explain it and maybe I will get one on my next trip.

It's quite simple, they are doing what your hands would do but in a controlled environment. You put in all the ingredients set the machine, for example they have different settings for different types of bread, and leave it to do it's job! The loaves are often a bit of a strange spape but the bread is excellent.

Personally I prefer to use the old fashioned method, I think the kneading is great fun!

One real advantage of a bread making machine is that you can set it on a timer and wake up to freshly baked warm bread - yummy!

Suega

Do you know how to get the bread a little more light, in which I mean more 'air' in them,

Jumbo

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Do you know how to get the bread a little more light, in which I mean more 'air' in

IMHO bread will be light or not ..depends on

1- recipe

2 -yeast - fresh or not?

3-yeast 's food - sugar

4- time /temp/humidity - that you wait till yeast produce CO2 and make dough get increase the size

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Basic Bread (busycooks.about.com)

Bread Ingredients

Make sure your yeast is fresh. Active dry yeast, sold in individual packets, is the easiest type to use, and keeps well in your pantry. There is always a 'best if used by' date on the packages, and you should follow this rigorously. If you are going to take the time to make bread, fresh yeast is essential. Cake yeast, if you can find it, really makes a wonderful loaf of bread. This form of yeast is fresh, stored in the refrigerator, and is very perishable. When you buy it, use it within 1-2 days, or it may mold.

The temperature of the water, whether used to dissolve the yeast, or added to a yeast/flour mixture, is critical. Until you get some experience, use a thermometer. When the yeast is dissolved in the water or other liquid, the temperature must be 110 to 115 degrees. When the yeast is combined with flour and other dry ingredients, the liquid temperature can be higher; about 120 to 130 degrees.

The flour you choose for your bread also makes a difference in the quality of the final product. Bread flour makes a superior loaf. This flour is higher in protein content, and protein, or gluten, is what gives bread its unique texture. When water is added to flour, two proteins, glutanin and gliadin, combine to form gluten. Gluten forms a network of proteins that stretch through the dough like a web, trapping air bubbles that form as the yeast ferments. This creates the characteristic air holes of perfect bread. All purpose flour will also work just fine in most bread recipes. Don't use cake flour because there isn't enough protein in that type, and your bread will fall because the structure won't be able to withstand the pressure of the gasses the yeast creates.

Whole grain flours and other types of flour add color, texture, and flavor to breads. These flour types don't have enough gluten to make a successful loaf on their own, so all purpose or bread flour is almost always added to provide structure.

The type of liquid you use will change the bread characteristics. Water will make a loaf that has more wheat flavor and a crisper crust. Milk and cream-based breads are richer, with a finer texture. These breads brown more quickly because of the additional sugar and butterfat added to the dough.

Fats, oils, butter and shortening add tenderness and flavor to bread. Breads made with these ingredients are also moister. Make sure you don't use whipped butter or margarine, or lowfat products, since they contain water. The composition of the dough will be weakened, and your loaf will fail.

Eggs add richness, color, and flavor to the dough and resulting bread. Egg breads have a wonderful flavor. Sugar is the fuel that feeds yeast so it ferments, producing carbon dioxide that makes the bread rise. Some bread recipes don't use sugar, but depend on sugars in the flour to provide food for the yeast.

Salt is essential to every bread recipe. It helps control yeast development, and prevents the bread from over rising. This contributes to good texture. Salt also adds flavor to the bread.

Toppings can change the crust of the loaf. Egg glazes are used to attach other ingredients like nuts or seeds. An egg yolk glaze will create a shiny, golden crust. Egg white glazes make a shiny, crisp crust. For a chewy, crisp crust, spray the dough with water while it's baking. If you brush milk on the dough before baking, the crust will be softer and tender. Brushing the baked loaf with butter will also make the crust softer. Enjoy experimenting with toppings and the recipes!

Bread Making Methods
Begin by reading the recipe carefully. Make sure you have all the necessary ingredients. Start with a simple bread loaf recipe, like the French Bread recipe below.

Measure the liquid called for, and heat it to the correct temperature. Sprinkle the yeast over the liquid, and let this sit for a few minutes. This is called proofing the yeast, and ensures that the yeast is fresh and active. When the yeast mixture rises and starts bubbling, proceed with the rest of the bread recipe.

Measure part of the flour into a bowl, and add any other dry ingredients or flavorings. Make a depression, or well, in the center of the flour, and add the dissolved yeast and other liquids. Beat well to combine.

Gradually add the rest of the flour until the bread dough becomes difficult to stir. At this point, flour your work surface and dump the dough out of the bowl onto the floured surface. Begin kneading the dough.

To knead, turn the dough over several times, gathering any stray particles. Fold the dough in half towards you, and push away with the heels of your hands. Turn the dough one quarter turn, and repeat this process until the dough is smooth, elastic, springy, and no longer sticky. This will take from 5 to 10 minutes. Doughs made with bread flour typically require more kneading than those made with all purpose flours.

Grease a large mixing bowl lightly with shortening. Place the smooth, kneaded dough into the bowl, turning it over so the top is greased as well. This step makes sure the dough doesn't dry out as it rises. Cover with a clean cloth and place in a warm spot. An electric oven with the light turned on, or a gas oven with the pilot light are perfect places for rising.

Let the dough rise until double in bulk. This means the dough increases in size, and when you press your fingers into the top, the indentation remains when you remove your fingers. Punch down the dough, and turn it onto a floured surface. Shape according to the recipe.

Place the dough in greased loaf tins, or on a greased cookie sheet for freeform loaves. Cover and let rise again until double in size. This second rising will take less time, because there is more yeast in the dough.

Bake the bread in a preheated oven. The bread should rise a bit in the oven too - this is called 'oven spring'. Bake according to the recipe until golden brown. The bread is done when it sounds hollow when you tap it with your fingers. Remove from the pans and let cool on a wire rack, then stand back as your family attacks it.

Other Methods

Sometimes the yeast is stirred into the flour, instead of being proofed separately. The only change in this type of recipe is the water should be warmer. Follow instructions as above.

Batter breads start with wet doughs or batters. This type of dough isn't kneaded, but stirred vigorously for a longer period of time to develop the gluten. The dough is stirred down after rising, instead of punching down, and spooned into loaf pans to rise and bake.

Sweet breads and other savory flavored breads usually have special shaping instructions. Follow the recipes carefully.

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I can not stand Thai bread. :o

It is too sweet and no taste.

If you have an oven, make your own, dead easy, go on the internet for directions.

if you have a bread maker even easier.

You dont need special flower any will do, use skimmed milk and butter is ok if you can not get lard, they might call lard. Shortning.

Try any supermarket bakers and ask if you can buy some live yeast from them, a little goes a long way.

I have been making my own bread in Thailand for 10 years, no problem. :D

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