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"Westernised" Chinese Food?


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Are there any "Westerntowns" in Thailand?

Interesting question. I guess Thai "Western" food such as steak with pepper sauce, veal schnitzel, and spaghetti bolognese could still be found in some old and almost forgotten cafes along Silom, or Khao San. Can't imagine a Thai expat in the US craving this stuff though.

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Are there any "Westerntowns" in Thailand?

Interesting question. I guess Thai "Western" food such as steak with pepper sauce, veal schnitzel, and spaghetti bolognese could still be found in some old and almost forgotten cafes along Silom, or Khao San. Can't imagine a Thai expat in the US craving this stuff though.

I recall there was a popular western food for Chinese tastes restaurant going strong in San Francisco. Not sure if it's still there. It's funny to imagine a Thai in the U.S. griping that they can't find "American fried rice" with a hot dog!
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Sweet and sour sauce is so easy to make yourself and to get that real cantonese stickiness. Cook in the pan what ever you like (onion, chicken, cashews, pineapple is a bog standard); add sugar, vinegar, tomato sauce (Ketchup which is what the HK joints use) or tomato puree, a drop of worcestshire sauce or a dribble of soy and simmer it until you reach your preferred texture. Just stick the sauce components in a pan by themselves and you have just the S+S sauce to pour onto deep fried chicken or pork balls if you have a craving for that. So simple though and the sauce takes 3-5 minutes to cook.

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  • 4 weeks later...

when I lived in England I tried to find US west coast style chinese takeaway food but there is a whole different variation there, horribly greasy and inedible...it compared unfavorably but the chinese chip shop owners did the best fish and chips in Brighton...

then I traveled to China on business and was feted extensively as owner's representative and then there was a whole new way of looking at the world with extensive discussion on food preparation with the local engineers and there would be disagreements and fisticuffs in the restaurants...those dudes are serious...

after the second trip as I was fussing over noodle preparation the ex-wife observed sceptically in dressing gown, fag and cup of tea and said: 'yer skin is gettin' yella and there is now a slitty-eyed aspect to yer countenance...I thought that I married a white man...' and it was then the devil's business forever after...

Edited by tutsiwarrior
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  • 2 weeks later...

Proper crispy duck n pancakes please with good hoi sin sauce....where?

You can get London China Town style Crispy aromatic duck with pancake roles and the dark sauce etc at the Nan Yuan : Chinese Restaurant which is inside the Grand Mercure Fortune Hotel in bangkok.

Take MRT to Rama 9 and head for Fortune.

You should call to order your Aromatic duck in advance. Sorry i do not have the number near me.

Enjoy

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UK style crispy aromatic duck (1/4 of a fat duck) is available for a mere 149 baht including ample pancakes, cucumber, green onions, and hoison sauce at Katai Restaurant, Soi Lengkee off Soi Buakow, Pattaya. No need to order in advance. Viva Pattaya!

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I have long maintained that when comparing Chinese food from most of China with that of the US, the US would win hands down. Even the westernized Chinese food is more edible.

Hong Kong is a different story, but if you travel though the industrialized areas, food is really deplorable. However, I just got back from Shanghai, and I would put the food there, at least at the places in which I ate, as really quite terrific. Most of it, I really did not recognize. The SIchuan Folk specialized in giant salamander, yak penis, "ass meat," and the like, but it also had Kung Pao Chicken, although not like anything I had tried in the US. It was heavily laced with vinegar. Quite good, though.

One new restaurant had some "San Francisco" Chinese food. Once again, I had never had any of it before, but the shrimp in "tartar" sauce and apples was amazingly good. The tartar sauce was a spicy orange-colored concoction, but boy was it tasty!

I like the bulk of the cuisines found in China, and I like Americanized Chinese food as well. I cook orange chicken and Mongolian lamb here in Thailand regularly, but even that is with a more European flair than what I can get in the US. I like the Shangarila Restaurant off Soi Thaniya, but I would mind a restaurant which makes more westernized Chinese dishes.

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These so called favorites are easy to make at home. It can be a little time consuming to make sweet and sour pork.

Another reason why food taste crap is because the store owner buys cheap crappy produce. I have found Villa to have some of the best local produce supplied from an organic farm.

Places you shouldn't buy food from if you expect quality are Tesco, Big C and Carrfour.

Best area to shop would have to be Thong Lor. The Tops supermarket near burger king and star bucks is one of the better ones I've shopped at along with Villa at Paradise Park.

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My quick and easy sweet and sour pork.

You can buy all these ingredients at Foodland. If you look in the packet sauce section along with the Thai packet mixes you will see an orange colored packet with some Chinese writing on it.

2x Sweet & Sour sauce pkts

400g Pork Fillet (Look in the display window you will see it in tube like casing..) Don't use pork steak it will dry out

Corn flour

bicarb soda

1 Fresh Pineapple

Red and Green Peppers/Capsicum (You can get pre-cut stuff from the salad bar if you don't wanna buy two whole peppers)

1x Onion

Jasime Rice <-- should have loads at home lol

1. Cut pork in to bite size pieces

2. Mix corn flour and bicarb soda with some water to make batter. Not sure of ratio, it may be written on the back of the sauce packet. You only need a little bicarb soda.

3. Dip your pork pieces in to batter and fry in small batches... Do not over crowed the pan.

4. After cooking your pork, cut onion and capsicum and fry in a wok or non stick pan for 2-3mins.

5. Add pineapple and meat and sauce. <-- you can fry the pineapple before adding meat and sauce if you desire.

Not to hard to make, just a pain in the butt making the fried pork lol.

If you like cooking at home like me, then this wont be a problem to make!

Edited by Sayonarax
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