Jump to content
BANGKOK
Sign in to follow this  
loong

Tomatoes That Grow Well Here

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

I usually consider September to be the start of the growing season as i will start off seedlings so that they are ready to plant out when the rainy season starts to ease off. Well last year was basically a washout as I couldn't work my sodden plot as the heavy rains kept going so late.

We got heavy rains a few times at the end of January and that beat down a lot of my plants.

At the moment I just have 2 Black Russian tomato plants that are producing very well, the fruits don't look exactly perfect, but they taste great. Even my missus enjoys munching on these large tomatoes and she usually only l;ikes the small ones in Som Tum!

These have no overhead shade netting and for some reason have not suffered from mealybug attack that has made life difficult for my other tomato plants. They,ve even coped well with the leaf miner that moved in on the other plants about 6 weeks ago. They also seem unfazed from the extreme heat of the last week. I don't usually expect to be getting decent tomatoes at this time of year.

I've never really tried to save seeds from tomatoes before, but I will be fermenting and saving the seeds from the best fruits from these plants. I will be hoping for a better growing season this year.

So, has anyone else had success with any other varieties? I think that Soidog does well with his toms, so look forward to an update from him about how well things have gone for him lately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Black Russians did well for me too, very tasty.

This year I planted Cherry Tomatoes because they are plentiful and not bothered by the heat.

A couple of years ago I went to India & found a very good hybrid.

Plants not too tall, a lot of fruit, sweet and easy to grow.

Later on; from dropped fruit, seedlings started coming up almost as good as the parents.Unusual for hybrids.

I am now growing this open pollinated variety.

For exotics, I only have "big boy tomato" , just flowering now.

http://www.burpee.com/vegetables/tomatoes/beefsteak/tomato-burpee-s-big-boy-hybrid-prod000976.html

regards

Edited by soidog2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Soidog.

Certainly, the cherry tomatoes do grow well. I prefer the sungold vairiety, but unfortunately none came up this year. Think that the seeds got a bit damp.

This year I have allowed the self seeded toms grow wherever they happen to be and they are mostly cherry types. They seem to like growing in amongst the bunching onions and I have noted that these plants also seemed to avoid the mealy bug infestation, but still suffered from the leaf miner.

I am back to the Uk for a visit next month so will pick up a few packets of seeds while I am there.

Do you do anything to protect your tom plants during the rainy season?

Please keep us posted about your "Big boys" ;)

It will be interesting to know as we have now entered the worst time of year for growing toms. If they are only just flowering now, it will be a real challenge for them to actually set fruit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I gave up babying the tomatoes, it takes too much time; I only protect them from bugs.

My quest now is to find one tasty tomato that will do well on it's own.

I'll let you know how it goes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi , guys, why not think about a hydroponic tomatoe in a 15 ltr bucket with 2-3mtr pvc pipe for the steak, then you can pick it up and move it when required, cooco peat is dirt cheap in thailand , when i get to thailand in the next few months , i will be setting a small farm doing hydroponic , hard to get vegetables, if all goes to plan, fingers crossed, and will bring with me the type of tomatoe i grow here in Aus, i grew a tomatoe this summer and got over 20kg/plant with the simple bucket system i used.

Thanks

Scoop1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi , guys, why not think about a hydroponic tomatoe in a 15 ltr bucket with 2-3mtr pvc pipe for the steak, then you can pick it up and move it when required, cooco peat is dirt cheap in thailand , when i get to thailand in the next few months , i will be setting a small farm doing hydroponic , hard to get vegetables, if all goes to plan, fingers crossed, and will bring with me the type of tomatoe i grow here in Aus, i grew a tomatoe this summer and got over 20kg/plant with the simple bucket system i used.

Thanks

Scoop1

Hello Scoop,

I have no idea what you mean by "with 2-3mtr pvc pipe for the steak" but then I have no experience of hydroponics.

Also " cooco peat", do you mean the fibre that surrounds the coconut? Is that used for filtration or something?

The main difficulty with growing toms here is the climate, too hot or too wet with a relatively small ideal growing period in the cool season. Pests and fungus also come into the equation. I would guess that with Hydroponics, fungals are likely to be less of a problem.

Is your hydroponics in a bucket organic? If so, maybe an interesting read, why not start a new thread with more details?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Loong, what i mean by the stake is i use a 2/3mtr 25mm pvc pipe to support the plant, i put it inside the bucket and dirill holes top and bottom of the bucket at the same width as the pipe and then i use plastic cable ties to hold it in place, also when it rains you can just pick it up and move it where ever you desire. Yes thats what coco peat is , but you must use the peat that has been washed out properly because it contains a lot of salt, there is proper coco peat in Thailand for hydroponic use. No it is not organic as such, it does not grow in the soil, i make my own nutrients and then dilute them in water and feed it to the plant, and if the nutrient is balanced you really cant hurt it, very simple, and versatile, and you can get it away from the rain and the heat if you desire

Cheers

Scoop

post-135220-0-89830300-1336018718_thumb.

post-135220-0-14263800-1336018771_thumb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tomatillos grow well for me, not much luck with tomatoes yet. I got a couple fruits from a Marglobe Supreme tomato plant, the rest died last season.... trying more heat/humid hardy varieties now, probably will keep them in pots to prevent wet-feet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

solar fire, you can buy the seeds on ebay from merl's garden center, will ship here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Black Russians did well for me too, very tasty.

This year I planted Cherry Tomatoes because they are plentiful and not bothered by the heat.

A couple of years ago I went to India & found a very good hybrid.

Plants not too tall, a lot of fruit, sweet and easy to grow.

Later on; from dropped fruit, seedlings started coming up almost as good as the parents.Unusual for hybrids.

I am now growing this open pollinated variety.

For exotics, I only have "big boy tomato" , just flowering now.

http://www.burpee.co...prod000976.html

regards

I have been growing big boys and beefsteak tomatoes for the last 2 years. here is a photo taken last year.

I have made a lot of mistakes and learning a lot from reading on line and trial and error.

Right now, I have about a dozen plants that have been bearing fruit since about Feb 1. all green but, ranging in size from marble sized to pool ball sized.

9q8eg1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last year, I had ripe frout weighing it from 1/2 to 1 kilo.

But, I do have a high amount of crop failure about 3-4 weeks after transplanting to the earth. I lose about 50%. so, this year, I am trying something new. I planted the first seeds in late November in pots and transplanted them around the end of December. mid January, I started additional seeds and will transplant them in 2-3 weeks to the earth whereever I have a plant die (from whatever reason).

This season, many of the plants started to flower when they were only about 12-18" high. I pinched them off and also keep the suckers pinched off as well. Now I have plants varying in size from 18" high to about 4' high. Some of the smaller ones, I am letting flower for pollination purposes.

I wll post more photos when the tomatoes begin to ripen.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here for your approval, are some "Arkansas Marvel" heirloom tomatoes that did rather well in daily 100 F weather.

Ripened today.

post-14625-0-80563400-1363952045_thumb.j

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good thread! I am looking for a type suitable for tropical climate and growing in containers.

Has anyone got any experience with the Atkinson tomato (Auburn University, 1966)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...