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loong

Tomatoes That Grow Well Here

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I went from no fresh tomatoes (except for the small, lightly sour tasting local types) to the fruit ripening and picking one or 2 vine ripe tomatoes a day to now, picking a couple kilos daily. The term "feast or famine" comes to mind. The local tomatoes in the market sell for about 50 baht a kilo. People have offered 100 baht a kilo for mine (Rugers, Beefsteak and Big Boy) and my wife has been selling them. WIthin a month, sadly,the major harvest will be over and it will be back to one or 2 a day until there are no more and it wil be 9 long months until picking begins again. The largest one weighed in at a little under .5 kilo and I have many small ones the size of cherry tomatoes. The average size is 100-200 grams though.

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Hello All, ran across this packet while buying pots for starting butternut and acorn squash.

Bt. 20 for about 40 seed, Hyb's.

rice555

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Tomatoes don't need light to ripen. Pick them green, wrap in newspaper and leave in a dark, cool place. (Drawer)

Great topic. Keep those recipes and photos coming.

'And Kjun12......"Virus and wilt" eh? Lighten up son. We're all having fun.smile.png

Regards.

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my tomatoes, seeded beginning of September, started to ripen about new years. about 4 weeks ago, I was able to pick one or 2 daily. about 2 weeks ago, I was able to pick about 1 kilo every couple days. I picked 3 kilos Friday and, picked again today and got a whopping 6 kilos. I am at the peak of the harvest now. the plants have stopped flowering about a week ago now. I fear that, my this time next month, I will be back to 1 tomato daily and not long before it's all over with for another 10 months.

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I'm getting a good harvest now KhunKeith :)

My toms in pots are suffering with leaf-miner as they always seem to this time of year.

Still, I have a lot of self seeded cherry toms in the garden and they will keep me going until the next cool season.

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I have a questions about Thai tomatoes and didn't want to start a knew thread. For the normal Thai tomatoes (macua thet) and for the small ones (macua cua) does anyone know if they are determinate or indeterminate?

Thanks

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I have a questions about Thai tomatoes and didn't want to start a knew thread. For the normal Thai tomatoes (macua thet) and for the small ones (macua cua) does anyone know if they are determinate or indeterminate?

Thanks

determinate or indeterminate?

I can never remember which is which smile.png

The small cherry type are usually more bushy and don't need much support, mind you, give them something to climb and they can go up to 2 metres.

The larger, egg shaped toms will trail around and put down adventitious roots until they find something to climb.

Mind you, I use the term "climb" loosely. Toms are not good climbers and need good all round support to do so.

This time of year, I have a "wild" section in my plot where I have a lot of pigweed growing with toms. I believe that the pigweed with its taproot takes nutrients from lower levels of soil that the toms and so brings up leached nutrients for recycling. At the same time, it doesn't steal nutrients from the toms and also shades them a bit while giving support. It looks like a jungle, but works well until the rains come

Edited by loong

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from my experience this last growing season, i discovered a tomato called "Tommy Toe" really performed well in the heat and full sun.

large, sprawling indeterminate that grows a lot of very sweet deep red ping pong ball sized fruit. no disease problems, (wilt, B.E.R.).

funny thing though, the place where i ordered from, http://store.tomatofest.com/Tommy_Toe_Cherry_Tomato_Seeds_p/tf-0503.htm , describes it as ideal for a cooler climate, but for me at least, it did well in full sun where the rest of my tomatoes (Cherokee Purple, Brandywine OTV, Marvel Striped) did good but liked the shade cloth over their heads.

still lots of fruit on it even now, but i've seen the last of my flowers in this near constant 40C heat, and i'm grudgingly pulling some out as i'm just wasting water on them now.

anyways, even though i'm a big fan of the bigger heirloom slicers, "Tommy Toe" is a nice change of pace and worked well for me.

next year i'll start my first "crop" a lot earlier so i can squeeze in a second planting before the heat gets turned up. ordered 16 new varieties (from Tomatofest) to go along with the seed i saved this year, so hopefully have a few more to recommend this time next year.

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I have had great luck with the following tomatoes. I am growing these hydroponically and aquaponically, so I can't attest to soil growing.

Big Beef (The variety is Big Beef, not to be confused with the genre of Beef Steak. I netted 12 Kilos off of 8 plants on the first harvest. Heavy heavy producers. The average of each fruit was about 150 grams)

Riesentraube (This is an heirloom indeterminate cherry. I got so tired of picking them, that's how productive these things were.) They just flower and flower and flower and fruit, fruit, fruit.)

I am currently growing Pink Brandywines, but have lost a couple of plants to Bacterial Wilt. I am also growing Purple Cherokee, but I can see already I'm going to have issues with Spotted Wilt Virus, and general fruit setting. It's important to remember, these heirlooms are often not going to produce like a hybrid will. They weren't bred for maximum production or cosmetics, they were bred for flavor.

Right now I'm trying Triple L Crop, Scotland Yellows, and waiting on some seeds for Mortgage Lifters. I have about 30 varieties I need to trial, but I try not to grow them all at once, or I get some really bad cross pollinating going on. I have 2 hydroponic setups (12 plants each), in different locations, and then a fairly large aquaponics system (36 tomatoes). I try to grow one variety at a time in each setup, or else I'll have to bag the flowers to avoid cross pollination.

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I have had great luck with the following tomatoes. I am growing these hydroponically and aquaponically, so I can't attest to soil growing.

Big Beef (The variety is Big Beef, not to be confused with the genre of Beef Steak. I netted 12 Kilos off of 8 plants on the first harvest. Heavy heavy producers. The average of each fruit was about 150 grams)

Riesentraube (This is an heirloom indeterminate cherry. I got so tired of picking them, that's how productive these things were.) They just flower and flower and flower and fruit, fruit, fruit.)

I am currently growing Pink Brandywines, but have lost a couple of plants to Bacterial Wilt. I am also growing Purple Cherokee, but I can see already I'm going to have issues with Spotted Wilt Virus, and general fruit setting. It's important to remember, these heirlooms are often not going to produce like a hybrid will. They weren't bred for maximum production or cosmetics, they were bred for flavor.

Right now I'm trying Triple L Crop, Scotland Yellows, and waiting on some seeds for Mortgage Lifters. I have about 30 varieties I need to trial, but I try not to grow them all at once, or I get some really bad cross pollinating going on. I have 2 hydroponic setups (12 plants each), in different locations, and then a fairly large aquaponics system (36 tomatoes). I try to grow one variety at a time in each setup, or else I'll have to bag the flowers to avoid cross pollination.

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guys , what is a good hydroponic crop to grow coming into the wet season ? i should have mentioned i have a greenhouse so rain is no issue and its well vented...

Edited by cdmtdm

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I have had great luck with the following tomatoes. I am growing these hydroponically and aquaponically, so I can't attest to soil growing.

Big Beef (The variety is Big Beef, not to be confused with the genre of Beef Steak. I netted 12 Kilos off of 8 plants on the first harvest. Heavy heavy producers. The average of each fruit was about 150 grams)

Riesentraube (This is an heirloom indeterminate cherry. I got so tired of picking them, that's how productive these things were.) They just flower and flower and flower and fruit, fruit, fruit.)

I am currently growing Pink Brandywines, but have lost a couple of plants to Bacterial Wilt. I am also growing Purple Cherokee, but I can see already I'm going to have issues with Spotted Wilt Virus, and general fruit setting. It's important to remember, these heirlooms are often not going to produce like a hybrid will. They weren't bred for maximum production or cosmetics, they were bred for flavor.

Right now I'm trying Triple L Crop, Scotland Yellows, and waiting on some seeds for Mortgage Lifters. I have about 30 varieties I need to trial, but I try not to grow them all at once, or I get some really bad cross pollinating going on. I have 2 hydroponic setups (12 plants each), in different locations, and then a fairly large aquaponics system (36 tomatoes). I try to grow one variety at a time in each setup, or else I'll have to bag the flowers to avoid cross pollination.

mate can i ask where u purchased the tomato seeds ? nice post thx

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I ordered them online from a seed company in the US.

All of these are readily available, just make whoever you order from ships internationally.

Your small mom and pops seed sellers are going to be more expensive, but much less hassle in terms of shipping you seeds. If you go to a big one, they might ship, but require a USDA inspection on behalf of Thai Customs, before the shipment goes out. I am going through that now for some seeds I couldn't find anywhere else.

I have had great luck with the following tomatoes. I am growing these hydroponically and aquaponically, so I can't attest to soil growing.

Big Beef (The variety is Big Beef, not to be confused with the genre of Beef Steak. I netted 12 Kilos off of 8 plants on the first harvest. Heavy heavy producers. The average of each fruit was about 150 grams)

Riesentraube (This is an heirloom indeterminate cherry. I got so tired of picking them, that's how productive these things were.) They just flower and flower and flower and fruit, fruit, fruit.)

I am currently growing Pink Brandywines, but have lost a couple of plants to Bacterial Wilt. I am also growing Purple Cherokee, but I can see already I'm going to have issues with Spotted Wilt Virus, and general fruit setting. It's important to remember, these heirlooms are often not going to produce like a hybrid will. They weren't bred for maximum production or cosmetics, they were bred for flavor.

Right now I'm trying Triple L Crop, Scotland Yellows, and waiting on some seeds for Mortgage Lifters. I have about 30 varieties I need to trial, but I try not to grow them all at once, or I get some really bad cross pollinating going on. I have 2 hydroponic setups (12 plants each), in different locations, and then a fairly large aquaponics system (36 tomatoes). I try to grow one variety at a time in each setup, or else I'll have to bag the flowers to avoid cross pollination.

mate can i ask where u purchased the tomato seeds ? nice post thx

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Right now, I am not growing anything. I am preparing the soil for the post rainy season planting. Mixing grass clippings, fertilizer and compost into the ground with my new roto tiller (I finally found one here in Thailand for home use!!!). I till the soil about twice a month to work everything together. Last year, that would have taken days or hard labor, but with the tiller, about 1 hour to break the soil into tiny bits andmix it up. I will start my seeds in early August and they will be transplanted mid September. If last year is any indication, I will be harvesting by CHristmas and have fresh tomatoes for 3-4 months.

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