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Sandman77

Where I Can Buy Solar Cells In Thailand?

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hello!

I plan this year to install solar cells on the roof of our house!

The power should enough for aircon for 2 rooms!

Can some experts give me advice how many m2 panels I need?

And aku system save the power!

Where I can buy this system in Thailand?

Can also order in eu?

If here to expensive?

Why Thailand use no solar cells with 365 sun in the years?

How much solar cells to realize the project would coasts aproximently ?

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I stand to be corrected by our more electrically knowlegable members of TV, but dont think you will be running an aircon(s) on solar too much amp draw on the compressor...

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I stand to be corrected by our more electrically knowlegable members of TV, but dont think you will be running an aircon(s) on solar too much amp draw on the compressor...

With 2 new eco. units, a 3 x 3 (9m2) it could be done but the real cost is the wiring and power storage.

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I looked into this a while back, and unless your intention is only to power the units and not use power off the grid and dont care at what cost, it is not financially viable. your roi would be far too long, especially if you factor in the cost of replacement panels and batteries.

the panels and hardware and electronics are expensive here and there are no subsidies to help you.

perhaps advances have been made in the last 8 or so years, but i doubt if they have trickled down to the Thai consumer.

I also found local suppliers very difficult to get a quote or any design advice out of.

that said, if you do succeed, i for one would be ecstatic to hear of your experience and perhaps benefit from it.

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I looked into this a while back, and unless your intention is only to power the units and not use power off the grid and dont care at what cost, it is not financially viable. your roi would be far too long, especially if you factor in the cost of replacement panels and batteries.

It's getting there due to lower manufacturing costs along with more efficient cells and also the ever increasing cost of power. Still a good few years off though.

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Ball park figure for a 3kW off-grid (with batteries) system from a Chinese supplier, USD 10k + duties and tax. If you already have mains power at the site you could go grid-tie (no need for batteries, your meter goes backwards during the day) for about USD 8k ++

Both would have about 20m2 of solar cells.

If you only want to run cooling you may be better off looking at directly solar powered aircon, there have been a couple of threads, try a search.

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I am interested in your comment about grid tie, is this an established thing in Thailand ??

I have some experience living on solar and the costs have dramatically reduced over the last few years.The overlooked problem has been the replacement of the batteries, in Australia that meant putting A$10 or more per week aside just for the batteries.

Obviously with out this cost I believe that solar is close to being an alternative.

There is a bloke in Chiangmai who knows his business (ABO) So no doubt there are others around.

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It's getting there due to lower manufacturing costs along with more efficient cells and also the ever increasing cost of power.

I brought that up to several Thai companies. They seemed to think it was a rude thing to say in light of the fact they raise their prices periodically.

Still a good few years off though.

Oh you mean the days of cheap, green power is just around the corner? After hearing this in the 80's, 90's, 00's and now 10's there is no longer credibility.

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If you want a DIY, you can walk in to Amorn electronics and buy it. They sell panels, controllers and everything needed.

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If you want a DIY, you can walk in to Amorn electronics and buy it. They sell panels, controllers and everything needed.

Which branch currently has solar kit? I've seen the occasional panel but no grid-tie inverters :(

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I'd be very nervous back feeding through the meter. I wouldn't want to be responsible for killing an electric company employee because the lines were still alive during a mains power failure.

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I'd be very nervous back feeding through the meter. I wouldn't want to be responsible for killing an electric company employee because the lines were still alive during a mains power failure.

That's why grid-tie inverters have Island Protection, if there is no mains the inverter shuts down.

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Ball park figure for a 3kW off-grid (with batteries) system from a Chinese supplier, USD 10k + duties and tax. If you already have mains power at the site you could go grid-tie (no need for batteries, your meter goes backwards during the day) for

To connect to the distribution grid in Thailand, while possible in theory, is not a trivial exercise. Even for very small installations you will need a power purchase agreement with PEA/MEA and then a separate permission to connect to their system. You will also need a factory license from the Industrial Works Department (Ministry of Industry). All of these require the submittal of drawings and technical details that no average homeowner would be able to produce and would probably cost more for an engineering company to prepare than the installed cost for a system that only generates a few kW. I think, if you consider a residential solar installation at all, you should forget about anything grid connected.

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Ball park figure for a 3kW off-grid (with batteries) system from a Chinese supplier, USD 10k + duties and tax. If you already have mains power at the site you could go grid-tie (no need for batteries, your meter goes backwards during the day) for

To connect to the distribution grid in Thailand, while possible in theory, is not a trivial exercise. Even for very small installations you will need a power purchase agreement with PEA/MEA and then a separate permission to connect to their system. You will also need a factory license from the Industrial Works Department (Ministry of Industry). All of these require the submittal of drawings and technical details that no average homeowner would be able to produce and would probably cost more for an engineering company to prepare than the installed cost for a system that only generates a few kW. I think, if you consider a residential solar installation at all, you should forget about anything grid connected.

Exactly, there is no provision for small grid-tie systems. In reality if you don't over generate nobody will be any the wiser.

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This drawing is from PEA's grid code and describes their requirements for connecting an inverter to their distribution secondary.

It's in Thai but mostly self-explanatory, I think. The dashed line separates PEA-owned plant from the privately-owned equipment.

My translation of the inverter requirements at the bottom of the drawing is as follows (the numbers in parenthesis are standard relaying nomenclature):

  1. Under/over voltage protection
  2. Over current protection for phase and ground
  3. Under/over frequency protection
  4. Synchronization check
  5. Anti-islanding protection in accordance with IEC 61727 and IEC 62116 or as approved by PEA

As mentioned above, approval is simple in theory but, in practice, not easy to satisfy the documentary requirements.

I'm sure that Crossy is correct in that, if you just hooked it up, nobody would ever know the difference. I don't think I'd be willing to risk it myself though.

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