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Is It Possible To Grow Vegetables Without Pesticide In Thailand ?

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Hi,

Do you know if it is possible to grow vegetables without using pesticide here in Thailand ?

When I am thinking about all the fat insects they have, it seems impossible, what do you think ?

And where do you by your pest free vegs and fruits in Bangkok ?

Thanks.

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It is very possible to grow vegetables without the use of highly toxic and environmentallly persistant pesticides, but it takes some knowledge, patience and a learning process. You just have to adapt and learn about least toxic methods, like biological controls, insecticidal soap, botanical sprays like neem oil extracts, baits and traps, mechanical methods (hand picking or wiping off of pests), growing varieties that are resistant to local pest and disease problems, etc. Build the soil fertility and mineralization, don't overfertilize and the plants will develop a level of natural resistance to pests and disease. Mulch to retain soil moisture and avoid plant physiological stress. Interplant your garden intelligently with specific companion plants that naturally repel certain insect pests. These are some examples

A lot depends on the scale of your growing operation. A small home garden for personal use is easy, and a few holes in your leafy vegetables from caterpillars may be acceptible; if you lose a plant or two during your learning process it's no big deal; a commercial growing operation where mono-cropping is practiced, where holes and blemishs caused by pests or disease will kill your sales is a different story. In a commercial operation you really need to know what you are doing, but it is not only possible to use "organic" methods, it is mainstream with some crops and in some locales.

Yesterday I had a customer call me to spray an apple tree in her home garden that she said on the phone had powdery mildew. When I inspected it, it was not mildew, but wooly apple aphid. It was a small tree so I showed her how to use a cotton gloved hand or two, or a rag, for mechanically wiping off the sticky globs of the aphid and it's waxy protective covering. One small tree, a retired lady, she was thrilled to have something productive to do. And I helped save the world by not spraying unnecessarily. If she had more trees or bigger, I would have suggested releasing a specific mini-wasp that I know will biologically control wooly apple aphid by ovipositing its eggs in the body of the aphid, and the larva when hatched will parasitize it.

It's facinating to me to study and practice these alternative methods and I encourage you to get into it. Read some of the pinned discussions at the beinning of the sub-forum and you will gain some knowledge and resources.

Edited by drtreelove

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on a small scale it is very possible

learn about neem, wood vinegar, mixed beneficial crops etc.

be prepared to work

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Have a vegie garden in the back yard, MIL tends it. Nothing used on it including fertiliser and we get great results. Guesss if you stick to what the Thais grow you have few problems. Jim

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Thank you, it's encouraging, as I really think that supermarket vegs and fruits that we eat in Thailand are going to kill me faster...

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.

You can, and the bugs will love you for it.

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Hi Sunday.

Sorry, but I really can't offer any advice on frequency of fertilisation.

My vegetable plot is about a quarter rai. I don't fertilise as such. I always have at least 2 compost heaps on the go. One cooking as I build the other. I include cow manure in the heaps.

Whenever I am preparing the ground I will dig in compost before planting the veg. I will add mulch if the soil dries out too quickly and forms a hard skin.

Apart from that, I don't add anything else.

I'm currently trying to learn about using EM and bokashi.

http://www.thaivisa....icro-organisms/

IsaanAussie seems to have got the hang of it

So I may well be adding a bit extra to my soil if I am able to get to grips with it.

Edited by loong

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Good question! There are people that try to produce in an environmentally friendly fashion: http://puraorganic.org

there must be others...

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