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Palm Oil Or Rubber

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No problem Joe, the price of palm oil varies between 2.5 to 3 bath/kg depending on many factors (similar to rubber price), but it 's more stable than rubber price. However, I am not sure about planting palm tree on Isaan area cuz palm tree kindda like water (I think you need more research on this, or some experts on your area might have some techniques). Another thing is to yield 4.8 tons per rai per year requires intensive maintenance and enough fertilization.

Thanks a lot.

I know Isaan is dry land. I realise my first job to be done is make boreholes and get enough supply of water. This goes also for rubber trees, they will grow anyway but if you like a nice yield water housekeeping is extremely important.

Thanks again for your input.

Joe

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Joe, if I can make a suggestion regarding palm oil and rubber . . . stick to rubber. Palm oil in Thailand is pretty much a controlled product and if it is converted into bio-fuel the government has already proposed a price limit which makes it close to unprofitable for manufacturers. Added to this you have the three large companies pretty much arranging the CPO market, never mind RBD or Olein.

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Joe Oil Palm is one of the hungriest Thirstiest plants you will find. If you satisfy that hunger and thirst the production is quite amazing. One of the things I think people forget about Oil Palm is that there are zellions of bi-products. If you have lots of relatives to find work for or like to set up small buinesses oil palm has a lot of potential. Bio-diesel, soap, skin oil, wine and many others. Something like the coconut. It is hard not to just sell the fruit, but the bi-prcducts are unlimited. There are lots of bi-products that aren't too hard to make and doubles your money.

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Wow...

what a great forum. Just stumbled on it after a lot of googling thinking (rather short sightedly !) that I was the only expat living in the south thinking of getting in to rubber (tree's). My wife's family have been on at me for 5 years to do this, I wish I'd found this earlier. Thanks again and I look forward to sharing my experiences with you. We are looking at 30 Rai initially, 10 year old trees just north of Surat thani, I'll post the price after i get it from the wife. Cheers

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Joe, if I can make a suggestion regarding palm oil and rubber . . . stick to rubber. Palm oil in Thailand is pretty much a controlled product and if it is converted into bio-fuel the government has already proposed a price limit which makes it close to unprofitable for manufacturers. Added to this you have the three large companies pretty much arranging the CPO market, never mind RBD or Olein.

Thanks for your input, very valuable information!

But the decision is getting more difficult now :o , I think I stick to my original plan of having 50% rubber and 50% eucalypt, rubber for later (8 years) and Euc for over 3-5 years. On top I will put some sugar and I will do intercropping with Papaya, Chili and Makua. Added to the cattle and pigs we should have a nice income and spreaded risks.

I worry if I can get good rubber trees. Ramses mentioned an interesting website and I wrote for quotes. I realise there is a LOT difference in yield depending on the tree, like the RRIT251 has about 50% more yield the usual trees, the 600 has already substantial more yield. So as always, a good start is the main thing.

Joe

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http://www.fao.org/docrep/005/AC781E/AC781E09.htm

A piece on an article from the above site on research in Malaysia

By the end of 1999 a total of 1,700 ha of pilot plantation had been established in various locations. Among the promising clones tested include RRIM623, RRIM900's series, PM10, PB235, PB260, and the newly launched RRIM2000's clones. Potential clones recommended by RRIM are categorized into two groups. Group I refers to clones that have proven tract records, tested and yield performance of five years in large scale clone trials recorded. Some of these clones are projected to yield between 1,500 to 2,000 kg of latex annually, and wood volume per tree between 0.75 m3 to 1.3 m3 per tree at age 15. These figures are more that 200 to 300% higher as compared to the old clones which now being harvested by the industry. Group II refers to clones which are selected in small scale clones trials based on five years yield record and the secondary characters available. These include clones from RRIM900 series and RRIM2000 series. The projected latex yields are between 2,000 to 3,000 kg per year and total timber per tree between 1.0 to 1.3 m3. at year 15. The performance of these clones in different climate, soil and disease environment are not available. Therefore these clones are only recommended for planting under close monitoring.

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I just returned from Kuala Lumpur yesterday - had two days of meetings with the MRB (Malaysian Rubber Board) and one of their subsidiaries and an agent for a particular product I mentioned previously, and I managed to get an exclusive contract for Thailand . . . quite amazing, really, though dealing with Malays is tough.

According to their research the rubber/latex price will continue to rise for the nest few years, as long as oil prices keep a 'steady' course.

Around 2012 a lot of rubber from newly-planted trees in China and India will hit the market and bring about a 'correction'.

Still, I believe the oil price will rise dramatically due to another venture in the Middle East by our US brethren or Iran deciding to limit their exports.

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http://www.fao.org/docrep/005/AC781E/AC781E09.htm

A piece on an article from the above site on research in Malaysia

By the end of 1999 a total of 1,700 ha of pilot plantation had been established in various locations. Among the promising clones tested include RRIM623, RRIM900's series, PM10, PB235, PB260, and the newly launched RRIM2000's clones. Potential clones recommended by RRIM are categorized into two groups. Group I refers to clones that have proven tract records, tested and yield performance of five years in large scale clone trials recorded. Some of these clones are projected to yield between 1,500 to 2,000 kg of latex annually, and wood volume per tree between 0.75 m3 to 1.3 m3 per tree at age 15. These figures are more that 200 to 300% higher as compared to the old clones which now being harvested by the industry. Group II refers to clones which are selected in small scale clones trials based on five years yield record and the secondary characters available. These include clones from RRIM900 series and RRIM2000 series. The projected latex yields are between 2,000 to 3,000 kg per year and total timber per tree between 1.0 to 1.3 m3. at year 15. The performance of these clones in different climate, soil and disease environment are not available. Therefore these clones are only recommended for planting under close monitoring.

Thanks Timber, great information.

Again it expresses how important it is to not just buy trees, but to buy the trees that are further developed to get high yields. The differences are so huge, sometimes double, that one has to go for special trees. I just worry if those special trees are available everywhere, to everyone and if so what prices we talk about. As Ramses gave a website already I wrote them an email but sofar no news.

Any more ideas where to get "high yield" trees?

Thanks

Joe

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http://www.fao.org/docrep/005/AC781E/AC781E09.htm

A piece on an article from the above site on research in Malaysia

By the end of 1999 a total of 1,700 ha of pilot plantation had been established in various locations. Among the promising clones tested include RRIM623, RRIM900's series, PM10, PB235, PB260, and the newly launched RRIM2000's clones. Potential clones recommended by RRIM are categorized into two groups. Group I refers to clones that have proven tract records, tested and yield performance of five years in large scale clone trials recorded. Some of these clones are projected to yield between 1,500 to 2,000 kg of latex annually, and wood volume per tree between 0.75 m3 to 1.3 m3 per tree at age 15. These figures are more that 200 to 300% higher as compared to the old clones which now being harvested by the industry. Group II refers to clones which are selected in small scale clones trials based on five years yield record and the secondary characters available. These include clones from RRIM900 series and RRIM2000 series. The projected latex yields are between 2,000 to 3,000 kg per year and total timber per tree between 1.0 to 1.3 m3. at year 15. The performance of these clones in different climate, soil and disease environment are not available. Therefore these clones are only recommended for planting under close monitoring.

Thanks Timber, great information.

Again it expresses how important it is to not just buy trees, but to buy the trees that are further developed to get high yields. The differences are so huge, sometimes double, that one has to go for special trees. I just worry if those special trees are available everywhere, to everyone and if so what prices we talk about. As Ramses gave a website already I wrote them an email but sofar no news.

Any more ideas where to get "high yield" trees?

Thanks

Joe

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I just returned from Kuala Lumpur yesterday - had two days of meetings with the MRB (Malaysian Rubber Board) and one of their subsidiaries and an agent for a particular product I mentioned previously, and I managed to get an exclusive contract for Thailand . . . quite amazing, really, though dealing with Malays is tough.

According to their research the rubber/latex price will continue to rise for the nest few years, as long as oil prices keep a 'steady' course.

Around 2012 a lot of rubber from newly-planted trees in China and India will hit the market and bring about a 'correction'.

Still, I believe the oil price will rise dramatically due to another venture in the Middle East by our US brethren or Iran deciding to limit their exports.

Thanks Sing_Sling, again valuable info.

I was going to ask if someone knew about a lot of rubber coming from India and China, as I read about India where huge plantations have been established in the past years. That should have an influence on the rubber prices.

On the other hand India and China have a fast growing demand for natural rubber as their automotive industry needs more and more rubber for tyres.

Joe

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I guess high yield trees depend a bit on putting them into the right environment, and giving them the tools to maximize their potential. There sure are a lot of things you can do. I guess the bottom line is getting a return on your investment. One thing a lot of people ignore is to go down to the forestry or agricultural office and find some guy who knows something about growing rubber or oil palm and ask him what he thinks. I used to do this back in Canada and it is amazing how happy they are to have someone to talk to. They generally have a wealth of good information or are quite willing to get it for you. Not many people do this.

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Hi Joe.

I guess you wrote your mail in Englisch. As you know, the most Thai-People

are speaking a very poor english. So maybe your mail in english went direct into

the trash for spammail ;-). Let some thaipeople (maybe your wife) call to the

phone number. Or do you have a the chance to write a mail in thailetters?

I think this is the reason. When I have to conect Thaipeople, I never do it by mail.

I almost never get an answer back. When I try it by phone, it works almost every time.

I.E. happened to me, when I tried to get some information from Thai Kubota about the

Ricetransplanter. My mails were ignored. Only phonecalls in thai worked.

Regards

Ramses

Edited by Ramses

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