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Tyrellius

Workload At International Schools.

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Everyone seems to be interested in trying to get into an International School. However, is it really worth it?

I have heard that the workload at some of the 'tier 1' and tier 2' schools can be massive. I am not entirely certain of this. However, I would guess that it is.

What do you guys think?

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P.S The title should be 'Work load at International Schools'. The key seem to be jamming on my laptop.

Can a mod or admin. change it please, Thanks.

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The workload in international schools is significantly higher, in my opinion, than in a Thai school.

When i worked in a Thai school, I created and submitted lesson plans, marked books (tick and flick only - no comments), set tests at the end of every term and input the test results in a ledger.

I taught my lessons and went home. I worked from 7.45 to about 4pm Monday to Friday. I think the key-words are that I was responsible for teaching and that's about it.

In the international school I work in now, I work from 7.30 to 5pm Monday to Friday. I catch up with marking and emails in the evenings or at weekends.

In addition to what i did in a Thai school, all teachers have a lot more responsibilities. Arrange assemblies once a week (on a rota), do homeroom and take care of the students' pastoral needs which can be significant, mark students books according to the ATL (Attainment Target Levels) and leave specific comments about how they can improve their level. Record student progress and show evidence about this. It may include photocopying work and filing it under the student's name in a very large filing cabinet for every student I teach. If students are either failing or advancing at a gifted-student rate I have to show how i am using differentiation to meet their needs. I have to make sure every student in my homeroom is doing their homework (subject teachers sign it off in their student diaries) and if they are not, call or email the parents and meet with them to discuss the problem. I have to organise at least 3 field trips per academic year and get parental consent for each of them. If students have a problem or are sick, as a homeroom teacher, I have to deal with this. Many lunchtimes will see some students in lunchtime detention. If i confiscate a mobile phone, I have to get the parents to come in. I probably answer 4 or 5 parental email enquiries per day ranging from 'Jane said Jimmy is bullying her' to 'Jane's aunt just committed suicide, please take it easy on her at school'.

Working at an international school required me to change up at least 2 gears. The workload is MUCH much more. However, the holidays are far far better. If I average out my working week over the course of a year, it's about the same as working in a Thai school.

Things that i like about it are that i speak at native English speaker rate as all lessons are in English. Most of our kids cannot speak Thai, so the lingua franca in the playground is English. The other thing is that i speak quietly. The students absolutely do NOT speak when I am speaking. That never happend in a Thai school.

I enjoy the increased level of responsibility with the students - the buck stops with me.

Tracking students' academic progress and providing evidence takes up an awful lot of time.

Hope that helps you.

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The above is all correct..........that's a normal workload for the good internationals.

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I am a parent trying to make a decision on sending my child to an international school and your post certainly helped me. I do hope that all the teachers are equally diligent and sincere like you.

The workload in international schools is significantly higher, in my opinion, than in a Thai school.

When i worked in a Thai school, I created and submitted lesson plans, marked books (tick and flick only - no comments), set tests at the end of every term and input the test results in a ledger.

I taught my lessons and went home. I worked from 7.45 to about 4pm Monday to Friday. I think the key-words are that I was responsible for teaching and that's about it.

In the international school I work in now, I work from 7.30 to 5pm Monday to Friday. I catch up with marking and emails in the evenings or at weekends.

In addition to what i did in a Thai school, all teachers have a lot more responsibilities. Arrange assemblies once a week (on a rota), do homeroom and take care of the students' pastoral needs which can be significant, mark students books according to the ATL (Attainment Target Levels) and leave specific comments about how they can improve their level. Record student progress and show evidence about this. It may include photocopying work and filing it under the student's name in a very large filing cabinet for every student I teach. If students are either failing or advancing at a gifted-student rate I have to show how i am using differentiation to meet their needs. I have to make sure every student in my homeroom is doing their homework (subject teachers sign it off in their student diaries) and if they are not, call or email the parents and meet with them to discuss the problem. I have to organise at least 3 field trips per academic year and get parental consent for each of them. If students have a problem or are sick, as a homeroom teacher, I have to deal with this. Many lunchtimes will see some students in lunchtime detention. If i confiscate a mobile phone, I have to get the parents to come in. I probably answer 4 or 5 parental email enquiries per day ranging from 'Jane said Jimmy is bullying her' to 'Jane's aunt just committed suicide, please take it easy on her at school'.

Working at an international school required me to change up at least 2 gears. The workload is MUCH much more. However, the holidays are far far better. If I average out my working week over the course of a year, it's about the same as working in a Thai school.

Things that i like about it are that i speak at native English speaker rate as all lessons are in English. Most of our kids cannot speak Thai, so the lingua franca in the playground is English. The other thing is that i speak quietly. The students absolutely do NOT speak when I am speaking. That never happend in a Thai school.

I enjoy the increased level of responsibility with the students - the buck stops with me.

Tracking students' academic progress and providing evidence takes up an awful lot of time.

Hope that helps you.

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It seems that International school Teachers do many of the same things as they do in the UK.

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It seems that International school Teachers do many of the same things as they do in the UK.

Indeed. We are inspected and accredited by the same organisation that inspects and accredits UK schools, so yes, we do exactly the same kind of work.

To Saakura - ask any prospective school who accredits them.

If the answer is just the Thai Ministry of Education, then I'd suggest you forget it. If it's a reputable, independent organisation, like say CfBT then you know that the school is being run to the same standards as in the UK. Their focus is absolutely on the student and that is how it should be !

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It seems that International school Teachers do many of the same things as they do in the UK.

Which is another good reason for those intending to teach at the better int. schools to get home country teaching experience as well as a PGCE or its equivalent. If you can hack teaching in a UK school for 2-3 years, you should be fine in an int.school. It would be a huge shock to the system for TEFL teachers though.

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It seems that International school Teachers do many of the same things as they do in the UK.

Which is another good reason for those intending to teach at the better int. schools to get home country teaching experience as well as a PGCE or its equivalent. If you can hack teaching in a UK school for 2-3 years, you should be fine in an int.school. It would be a huge shock to the system for TEFL teachers though.

When a TEFL teacher sends their CV into a real international school it gets filed straight in the bin without even being looked at. They won't even get their foot into the door so your point about it being a shock to them is totally irrelevent.

I don't think being a PGCE qualified teacher means you are less likely to be a drunk than a TEFL qualified teacher (I've met a few of each who were borderline alcoholics and only here for cheap beer and girls) but I do agree that comparing an EP school to a fully fledged international school is like apples and oranges.

I will agree in some ways that your qualifications and where you teach does not mean that you will be less likely to be an alchoholic, but generally, dare I say in the vast majority of cases, western qualified teachers that hold home country certification are by their very nature more professional than their TEFL counterparts.

It is a vocation that they have chosen and studied hard to get in to. They have also met the professional standards required by the GTC. It is a career, and they are less likely to blow it than a TEFL teacher who is just looking to extend there stay abroad. Remember that a international school teacher who decides to return to the UK will very likely continue in the profession and therefore needs good references, can the same be said for a TEFLer?

Please don't think I am tarring all TEFL teachers with the same brush here, there are some excellent practitioners out there, but your comparison of apples and oranges for EP schools and proper international schools also applies to the staff within them.

Edited by LucidLucifer
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When a TEFL teacher sends their CV into a real international school it gets filed straight in the bin without even being looked at. They won't even get their foot into the door so your point about it being a shock to them is totally irrelevent.

Doesn't stop some of the TEFL fraternity from wanting to get a nice int. school salary, though, does it..

BTW, lucifer, unless you're a moderator, kindly refrain from lecturing others as to what is, or isn't, relevant in their posts.

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When a TEFL teacher sends their CV into a real international school it gets filed straight in the bin without even being looked at. They won't even get their foot into the door so your point about it being a shock to them is totally irrelevent.

Doesn't stop some of the TEFL fraternity from wanting to get a nice int. school salary, though, does it..

BTW, lucifer, unless you're a moderator, kindly refrain from lecturing others as to what is, or isn't, relevant in their posts.

There is nothing wrong with the TEFL fraternity wanting a nice international school job and salary, but until they become certified properly, their chances of that are virtually non-existent. And once they are properly certified, they cease to be a TEFL teacher. Therefore, discussing whether a TEFL teacher could handle the pressures and workload of a teaching job in a real international school, is, by its very nature irrelevent, because it isn't going to happen.

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So,I guess that the workload at these 'good' international schools matches that of State schools in the UK?

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So,I guess that the workload at these 'good' international schools matches that of State schools in the UK?

So,I guess that the workload at these 'good' international schools matches that of State schools in the UK?

Yeah..........pretty much.

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So,I guess that the workload at these 'good' international schools matches that of State schools in the UK?

So,I guess that the workload at these 'good' international schools matches that of State schools in the UK?

Yeah..........pretty much.

Some of the better State schools, and many of the private schools too. The same rules, curriculum and accreditation is used.

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