Jump to content
BANGKOK
Sign in to follow this  
Tyrellius

Workload At International Schools.

Recommended Posts

Would you guys do this work if let's say, their was a new law stating that No teacher at an International school could get payed more than 70,000 baht a month?

Would you still do it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you guys do this work if let's say, their was a new law stating that No teacher at an International school could get payed more than 70,000 baht a month?

Would you still do it?

It wouldn't make it financially viable for me to do it at this time of my life. I previously turned down a much, much more lucrative contract in the middle-east to come to Thailand. So my answer would be definite no. Ask me again in another 15 years, and you may get a different answer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All the teachers at my kids school are excellent.....never had an issue with any one of them.

The holidays are ridiculous though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you guys do this work if let's say, their was a new law stating that No teacher at an International school could get payed more than 70,000 baht a month?

Would you still do it?

I keep telling people - it's not how much you earn, it's how much you can save living the lifestyle you want.

For example, I have a friend in the UK who is a qualified teacher with 4 years experience. He earns 34,000 pounds per year living in London.

Thats about 140k Thai baht per month before tax. Lets say about 110k after tax. He pays nearly 50k a month in rent. That leaves him 60k a month.

Which is not a million miles away from someone earning 70k a month in Thailand at this point.

Personally, I eat out for every meal and have a good drink up once a week, have a nice house with a maid/cleaner coming once a week.

Dial that into your London salary and you're just about spent up for the month.

On your (ficticious) 70k a month Thai salary, you're still streets ahead.

I definitely save more than my UK counterparts here for the same lifestyle I'd say.

Oh, and i don't have to pay to go on holiday.

I live in the place where people pay to go on holiday..........!

There's an old adage along the lines of 'you don't go into education if you want to be rich'.

Education is a calling.

Earning enough to make it comfortable makes it that little bit easier.

I'll never be monetary rich, but I also never count down the days to pay day.

Hope that helps.

If what you're really asking is '<deleted>, that seems like a whole load of work' then you'd be right. It is.

It is a substantial amount of work indeed -much more than your average 40 hour week working in an office. However, that is offset by 'ridiculous' holidays.

I have two things to say to people who begrudge the holidays teachers get.

1. It all averages out over the course of a year. I work a lot longer in an average week than many white collar workers

2. If you like the holidays, become a teacher. All you've gotta do is get a decent degree in a recognised subject from a good university, do a couple more years post-grad work, then start out on the bottom rung of the ladder. After about 10 years, you can consider that you've made it ! Easy really........................

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you sincerely for the above replies.

It does seem that the high salaries earned at these international schools go hand-in-hand with heavy workloads.

However, if you are a dedicated enough teacher (as you guys are), then that workload becomes part and package of the 'calling'.

One more question. How much is teacher taxed, on let's say a salary of 120,000 baht per month?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.rd.go.th/...ish/6045.0.html

It's progressive. You can find a table on the exact rates following the above link. I've just tried to cut and paste it into here, but the formatting went all off.

Just as an aside, with your posts on other threads, I presume you're thinking of applying for an international position. If you're hoping of securing one for the next academic year, you've left it a bit late.

Edited by LucidLucifer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.rd.go.th/...ish/6045.0.html

It's progressive. You can find a table on the exact rates following the above link. I've just tried to cut and paste it into here, but the formatting went all off.

Just as an aside, with your posts on other threads, I presume you're thinking of applying for an international position. If you're hoping of securing one for the next academic year, you've left it a bit late.

Yeah, I do think that I have left it a little late this year. I may stay another year in the UK, or head to a school that is recruiting in the ME. Probably the former though.7

Thank you for the table. LL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.rd.go.th/...ish/6045.0.html

It's progressive. You can find a table on the exact rates following the above link. I've just tried to cut and paste it into here, but the formatting went all off.

Just as an aside, with your posts on other threads, I presume you're thinking of applying for an international position. If you're hoping of securing one for the next academic year, you've left it a bit late.

Yeah, I do think that I have left it a little late this year. I may stay another year in the UK, or head to a school that is recruiting in the ME. Probably the former though.7

Thank you for the table. LL.

Hi, you asked if it (working in an International school) was really worth it? You're probably approaching it from a financial perspective when in reality being a teacher is vocational and motivation is usually intrinsic for teachers who love working with young learners.

The work load at a top International School in Thailand is high compared with a lecturing position in a Saudi university but there's no way that a school teacher would want to lecture and few people want to try, or are able to tolerate, life in Saudi on a compound, however generous the tax-free salary is. The remuneration packages are quite comparable but that is where the similarities end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you sincerely for the above replies.

It does seem that the high salaries earned at these international schools go hand-in-hand with heavy workloads.

I wouldn't call it a "heavy" workload, I'd call it a "normal" workload. smile.png Normal as compared to teaching jobs in the US or UK, that is. Yes, international school teachers work hard, but so do certified teachers all over the world. Honestly, I feel that if people aren't willing to put in the work (and I don't mean you, OP), then they shouldn't be teachers. The last thing that any education system needs is more teachers who do a half-assed job and try to get away with doing as little work as possible.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A post and several replies have been removed. It is not permitted to bash foreign teachers in general the in teacher's subforum. Please check the subforum guidelines before posting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you sincerely for the above replies.

It does seem that the high salaries earned at these international schools go hand-in-hand with heavy workloads.

I wouldn't call it a "heavy" workload, I'd call it a "normal" workload. smile.png Normal as compared to teaching jobs in the US or UK, that is.

Absolutely agree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been in a Thai school EP for many years as a mathematics teacher and we also have quite a heavy workload. I have 24 x 50min periods, start at 7.30-4.30. We have a horrendous amount of paperwork - class evaluations, score books, daily lesson plans, etc. Then there are monthly staff meetings, gate duty, parent teacher meetings etc. I test all my students weekly, giving me about 100 quizzes to mark per week. So those without experience of teaching in such a program should refrain from comments about the lower workload in Thai schools. I've been teaching 12 years so I manage to get all this done, mostly, during working hours. Yes there are some schools were teachers just go in and teach, then can go home, but I don't think these are in the majority.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And yes, the increased pay also has increased duties, workload, and expectations...

I don't mind that at all. I work very hard as it is teaching in a UK Primary school. I often am at school from 8am - 5.30/6pm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been in a Thai school EP for many years as a mathematics teacher and we also have quite a heavy workload. I have 24 x 50min periods, start at 7.30-4.30. We have a horrendous amount of paperwork - class evaluations, score books, daily lesson plans, etc. Then there are monthly staff meetings, gate duty, parent teacher meetings etc. I test all my students weekly, giving me about 100 quizzes to mark per week. So those without experience of teaching in such a program should refrain from comments about the lower workload in Thai schools. I've been teaching 12 years so I manage to get all this done, mostly, during working hours. Yes there are some schools were teachers just go in and teach, then can go home, but I don't think these are in the majority.

That's an awful lot of testing you are doing. Why do you need to test so much?

As a matter of interest, what do you do with the scores?

At our school, we do two tests per year. The rest of the year we use Attainment Target Levels which allow us to use continuous assessment of student ability and to modify our lessons immediately.

Many schools think a written paper test, where the scores are noted on a spreadsheet, actually mean something.

They don't. It's just paperwork.

Scores are only meaningful if they are used to improve the way the teacher delivers his lesson to that particular child.

I would serioulsy question any school that required me to mark hundreds of tests per week.

I can assess a student's abiltiy perfectly well using continuous assessment.

I don't waste my time on such nonsense as weekly tests. (I teach in Secondary by the way. Weekly spelling tests for primary have some use, though I would use peer-to-peer marking for them)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...