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Tyrellius

Workload At International Schools.

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Wonder how many "International School" teachers could handle the pressures of having to publish every year. Wait, it's irrelevant, because it's never going to happen.

And I wonder how many university lecturers could handle the pressures of far longer teaching hours plus marking/paperwork of an international school or US/UK school teacher. You know little of pressure until you have experienced that.

Nothing wrong with TEFLing, it's an honourable enough job. But you can't compare it in terms of workload to international school or US/UK/Aus etc school teaching.

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Having worked as a TEFLer and at an international school I can honestly say that the workload at an international school is far higher.

That is in no way meant to be a slight towards TEFLers. It is just my opinion based upon my experience.

Also in my experience, as I've mentioned earlier in this thread, the level of responsibility at an international school is much higher than when I was TEFLing. The buck for most things stop with the homeroom teacher, whereas when I was TEFLing, the buck stopped with the THAI homeroom teacher - ergo, far less responsibility for me !

That being said, there are SO many things that I find are better (for me) at an international school.

In no particular order.

1. No cancelled lessons. Ever. Not for marching practice, flower making, candle making, Krathong making, furniture moving, display board making or any other BS. Not ever. Ever.

2. All students speak English. There is no misunderstanding due to language, about exactly what standards are required.

3. We don't care how important you say your uncle's second cousin is. Your kid is in detention tomorrow night. Pick him up at 5pm.

4. If your kid doesn't work hard in class, do homework, or thinks he can mess around for longer than, oh, about 2 days, you will be called in, he will be put on report and we will suspend him if he doesn't improve.

5. If your kid gets a low score in a test, then that is the score that will appear on his end of year report. No retests. No erased scores.

6. 70 percent is an acceptable score. It won't go up because your child drew pretty pictures on the test paper.

7. When I'm teaching, your kid will be silent. I will indicate when the time has come for them to speak politely to the class or their work group. No ifs, no buts. (That NEVER happened when I was TEFLing except for periods of 3 or 4 minutes during tests)

8. I will go to the ends of the Earth to improve your kid's education. I expect you and them to reciprocate.

9. I will not answer my cell phone to you after 6pm. It's not that I don't care, it's just that it's unreasonable.

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I think this is starting to go off topic but first take a look at this link:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/23/sleep-deprivation-jobs_n_1294276.html#s716358&title=10th_Most_WellRested

which shows that teachers are one of top 10 well-rested professions.

Meanwhile, back at the workload at International schools.....

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An off-topic post has been deleted.

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When it has come to crunch time, actually, I *do* miss sleep- sometimes even a whole night's sleep- getting work done. That's part of the obligation I feel as a professional. Other times, I *am* very well rested. It depends what part of the year one is asking about.

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P.S. TEFL is a third, also laudable job, just in case you were wondering... it has lower entry barriers and wages here, but I don't find it by that nature to be 'inferior' either.

yep there's quite a number of Thais in my experience who have a genuine reason to thank their "humble" TEFL teacher from students all the way to top management.

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