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Chiang Mai: Salmonella Strain Might Reinfect Kids

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Salmonella strain might reinfect kids

EKKAPONG PRADITPONG

THE NATION

Chiang Mai

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CHIANG MAI: -- A drug-resistant strain of Salmonella bacteria, that was found in eggs causing 500 schoolchildren to fall ill, might continue lingering and re-infect them for another three months.

The provincial health office will send a team to tackle the situation and set food-safety measures at all schools in Chiang Mai, especially those that take boarders. The authorities insist that Salmonella-infected eggs have not hit the general markets.

After several cases of severe diarrhoea were reported at Suksa Songkhro Chiang Mai School on Monday, more students were admitted at nine hospitals in the province, bring the number of hospitalised children up to 500 as of yesterday morning. Though 367 were discharged, 127 are still in hospital for septicaemia, which requires the strongest type of antibiotics. A 17-year-old schoolgirl suffered from shock due to severe septicaemia and low blood pressure.

Chiang Mai health official Dr Wattana Kanchanamol said lab tests confirmed that the diarrhoea had been caused by a strain of Salmonella bacteria, which is drug resistant because of antibiotics mixed in chicken feed. The bacteria, living on fowl faeces, contaminated the eggs, he explained. He estimated that 300 of the 10,000 eggs donated to the school were found to be carrying the bacteria, adding that 26 of the patients have already had a relapse and nine had to be hospitalised.

Wattana said that though the bacteria’s 72-hour incubation period has passed, the children would be carrying the bacteria for another three months, hence they might have a relapse or infect others.

A medical team has interviewed the donor's family and collected samples of their faeces to see if they might be carrying the bacteria, he said, declining to reveal the donor's identity on grounds that the donation had been made with good intentions. Meanwhile, livestock officials were dispatched to inspect a chicken farm in Hang Dong district, he added.

Wattana said the donor family had boiled the eggs on Friday and Saturday but instead of refrigerating them, they had stored them on egg trays. On Sunday, they presented the eggs as an offering to the Kruba Sriwichai Monument and later delivered them to schools to serve with dinner the same evening. Some of the eggs also went to nine agencies and a community, and when a student from the Northern Region School for the Blind became ill after eating an egg, authorities managed to alert the donation receivers to get rid of the eggs.

Saying the outbreak had not affected the public at large and markets, he urged people to ensure that all eggs are properly cooked before consumption and always keep them refrigerated because Salmonella grows fast in hot weather.

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-- The Nation 2012-07-12

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Antibiotics mixed in animal food is a NO-NO. Boiling the eggs will kill the salmonella, but putting the eggs back in the dirty egg-trays will re-infect the eggs.

More education is urgently needed.

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Antibiotics mixed in animal food is a NO-NO. Boiling the eggs will kill the salmonella, but putting the eggs back in the dirty egg-trays will re-infect the eggs.

More education is urgently needed.

Generally it falls on deaf ears.... they will never change.

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they are selling such eggs in 7/11 too... ate them, was ok...

dont know about antibiotics, but boiled and not cooled for some days...

Edited by dingdang

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Antibiotics mixed in animal food is a NO-NO. Boiling the eggs will kill the salmonella, but putting the eggs back in the dirty egg-trays will re-infect the eggs.

More education is urgently needed.

I agree strongly. I remember my wife's family will store uneatened food in this glass cabinet, without any type of refrigeration! I didn't know I was being served a part of yesterday's food...and recieved the runs, something fierce. It seems the family is immune to something that is heavily unindated with bacteria..I am extrememly careful of eating anywhere in Thailand..these days.

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I don't really understand the headline " might reinfect kids " -- have these kids who were infected already been infected at another time ? --- or are the kids whio were infected expecting to receive another infection ? -- if so from where ? and when ? The article really does not address anything about reinfection.

Can anyone help and explain to me just what this means.

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...don't know how many times I had the sh**s here in Thailand from eggs......it's the storage / transport and handling that is wrong spoiling the eggs......

ever seen an 'egg pick-up truck' on the motorway driving around in the blazing sun with eggs on the back??????

recipe for disaster !!!

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8) Not to post extremely negative views of Thailand or derogatory comments directed towards all Thais.

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THese people aren't just suffering "a dose of the shits" - If you've had salmonella, you'll know it!

THe advice in the UK was, and I guess still is...to cook all eggs through thoroughly.

This means NO RUNNY YOKES etc - only hard boiled and thoroughly fried omelettes etc..........I doubt if this will happen.

As this strain salmonella isn't necessarily wiped out by antibiotics then it can live on inside the victim and the illness's symptoms can re-emerge.

PS - I wonder how people attribute their personal bouts of diarrhoea to any particular food they have just had - probably just guessing?

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...don't know how many times I had the sh**s here in Thailand from eggs......it's the storage / transport and handling that is wrong spoiling the eggs......

ever seen an 'egg pick-up truck' on the motorway driving around in the blazing sun with eggs on the back??????

recipe for disaster !!!

you might want to explain how you think it is "wrong".

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You can expect to see much more of this type of thing based on drug resistant and methicillin resistant varieties of bacteria and viruses that are being created and incubated in the factory farms throughout the developing worlds & the USA (EU & Aust have banned it), as they are still using the nasty old habits taught by the greedy western farming corps of old by feeding antibiotics to their animals sub-therapeutically in their feeds. Still today more than 70% of all production of antibiotics (by volume) is created for animal feeds. The drug resistant bacteria are grown and incubated in the intensively farmed animals and surely then find their way to you & children.

Margaret Chan (head of the WHO) made the statement a few months back, that "The age of safe medicine is ending" based primarily on the above-mentioned facts. See here for one report on that: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/health-chief-warns-age-of-safe-medicine-is-ending-7574579.html

This is not a Thailand or Asian problem, this is a human vs 'What the flock do we do now' problem; and it is a problem of our own making.

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It is always the same story. Some rich prick, mostly a Rotary member do not want to miss a photo opportunity. They donate sacks of rice, eggs and canned vegetables that are unsellable and expired to schools, prisons or old people homes. Chapeau for the elite that never throws anything away.

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I don't really understand the headline " might reinfect kids " -- have these kids who were infected already been infected at another time ? --- or are the kids whio were infected expecting to receive another infection ? -- if so from where ? and when ? The article really does not address anything about reinfection.

Can anyone help and explain to me just what this means.

I think what they mean is that once the 72 hour incubation has passed, the child then becomes a 'donor' who will infect others regardless of their symptoms. The problem with drug resistant bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract is that it is incredibly hard to resolve.

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I don't really understand the headline " might reinfect kids " -- have these kids who were infected already been infected at another time ? --- or are the kids whio were infected expecting to receive another infection ? -- if so from where ? and when ? The article really does not address anything about reinfection.

Can anyone help and explain to me just what this means.

...don't know how many times I had the sh**s here in Thailand from eggs......it's the storage / transport and handling that is wrong spoiling the eggs......

ever seen an 'egg pick-up truck' on the motorway driving around in the blazing sun with eggs on the back??????

recipe for disaster !!!

you might want to explain how you think it is "wrong".

Seriously, you don't understand that eggs being slowly cooked in the sun in the back of a pick (or other vehicle) is not a good idea? I think you will find most developed countries refrigerate the eggs from the earliest possible time until they are sold. Common sense.

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I don't really understand the headline " might reinfect kids " -- have these kids who were infected already been infected at another time ? --- or are the kids whio were infected expecting to receive another infection ? -- if so from where ? and when ? The article really does not address anything about reinfection.

Can anyone help and explain to me just what this means.

I think what they mean is that once the 72 hour incubation has passed, the child then becomes a 'donor' who will infect others regardless of their symptoms. The problem with drug resistant bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract is that it is incredibly hard to resolve.

I agree that a child can be come a carrier or as you say a "donor''. I further agree that it can be extremely difficult to eradicate, but I am still puzzled by their meaning. Salmonella, in general are extremely hardy and can survive for a long time outside of the host, but they can only re-enter the food chain from excretions from that host.

So, if this does not actually mean "reinfect', but means 'infect others', how do the excretions of the infected children get into the food of others?

I suspect that last years extensive flooding may have been responsible for distributing and enlarging this problem, since Salmonella can exist quite well for many months in a wet environment or many weeks in a dry environment. Perhaps we have not seen the last of this problem, and that is what the headline is trying to say.

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