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Crispy Peking Duck?


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Does anybody have any idea where to get (cheap, ideally) crispy Peking duck in Bangkok? Not the ubiquitous red roasted duck that you see everywhere but the classic Chinese takeaway dish in the UK with tiny pancakes, cucumber, Hoisin? sauce, etc? Does it even exist outside of the UK?

Hope someone can help smile.png

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Thanks for the link.

I've just found this review of a place on Sukhumvit:

http://www.pekopiko.com/language/en-US/Reviews/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/34/Chow-Down-with-Takeaway-Chinese-Food-at-the-Chow-Box.aspx

They call it aromatic crispy duck, with no mention of Peking, so maybe I'm getting confused and they're two completely different dishes. Anyway, by the look of the picture under the review this is exactly what I'm after, just like back in the UK.

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one of my specialities and would rather cook my own.if you have a conventional oven its easy and you will enjoy it more.buy yourself a fresh duck,soy sauce,2 lemons sliced,fresh ginger,2 tbsp.brown sugar.

boil a few pints water,add all the ingredients,20mins,

then bath the duck with the liquid,hang it to dry with a drip tray underneath,

the skin should be dry and a redish colour,

heat the oven to 220deg.lay the duck on a rack in a meat tray,and roast for 20mins,

turn the heat down to 170deg cook for 1.5hrs

pancakes,spring onions,oisin sauce,shredded cu.fid somewhere to hide and enjoy.

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Peking duck is served in slices, crispy aromatic duck is shredded (usually at the table) and is a Chinese-British invention. For the latter the duck is usually deep fried, making it much quicker to prepare.

Here in Thailand it's normal to eat just the skin of the Peking duck with pancakes. The meat is then served as a separate dish, often stir fried with preserved vegetables.

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One key to Peking Duck is that the skin has to be separated from the body prior to cooking. This allows the rendering fat to flow down while cooking and drip out.

Unless you just happen to have a commercial air pump handy, you can do this with your home vacuum cleaner. Stick one on of the hose in the blower valve, then stick the other end at the neck of the duck, firmly holding the skin around the nozzle. Turn on the vacuum, and when the skin puffs up away from the body, you are ready to start preparing your bird.

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One key to Peking Duck is that the skin has to be separated from the body prior to cooking. This allows the rendering fat to flow down while cooking and drip out.

Unless you just happen to have a commercial air pump handy, you can do this with your home vacuum cleaner. Stick one on of the hose in the blower valve, then stick the other end at the neck of the duck, firmly holding the skin around the nozzle. Turn on the vacuum, and when the skin puffs up away from the body, you are ready to start preparing your bird.

i have been cooking peking duck for 25years and have never heard anything what you say,on the first cooking at220deg.with a little bit of water in the meat tray that will draw out the fat,and at the end of the cooking the skin will just peel off simular to making pork crackling.i do know some blokes like to use a vacuum cleaner up their ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
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One key to Peking Duck is that the skin has to be separated from the body prior to cooking. This allows the rendering fat to flow down while cooking and drip out.

Unless you just happen to have a commercial air pump handy, you can do this with your home vacuum cleaner. Stick one on of the hose in the blower valve, then stick the other end at the neck of the duck, firmly holding the skin around the nozzle. Turn on the vacuum, and when the skin puffs up away from the body, you are ready to start preparing your bird.

i have been cooking peking duck for 25years and have never heard anything what you say,on the first cooking at220deg.with a little bit of water in the meat tray that will draw out the fat,and at the end of the cooking the skin will just peel off simular to making pork crackling.i do know some blokes like to use a vacuum cleaner up their ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Traditionally the cook would insert a short straw under the skin near the neck and blow until the duck inflated and the skin came away from the flesh. Not particularly hygienic, but some restaurants still use this technique.

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Theres a well known (and big!) Chinese restaurant on Rama 4 just off Soi Ngam duphli that someone recommended to last year or so that was supposed to have good Peking Duck but I haven't ever gotten there to try it.

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One key to Peking Duck is that the skin has to be separated from the body prior to cooking. This allows the rendering fat to flow down while cooking and drip out.

Unless you just happen to have a commercial air pump handy, you can do this with your home vacuum cleaner. Stick one on of the hose in the blower valve, then stick the other end at the neck of the duck, firmly holding the skin around the nozzle. Turn on the vacuum, and when the skin puffs up away from the body, you are ready to start preparing your bird.

i have been cooking peking duck for 25years and have never heard anything what you say,on the first cooking at220deg.with a little bit of water in the meat tray that will draw out the fat,and at the end of the cooking the skin will just peel off simular to making pork crackling.i do know some blokes like to use a vacuum cleaner up their ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Whether you have heard of it or not, separating the skin from the fat with air is the standard practice. You can look it up on wiki under the "cooking" paragraph as just one source.

The vacuum cleaner is just a modern convenience which makes it easy for the home cook to do it. Or, as AyG writes above, you can always go old school and use a straw.

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One key to Peking Duck is that the skin has to be separated from the body prior to cooking. This allows the rendering fat to flow down while cooking and drip out.

Unless you just happen to have a commercial air pump handy, you can do this with your home vacuum cleaner. Stick one on of the hose in the blower valve, then stick the other end at the neck of the duck, firmly holding the skin around the nozzle. Turn on the vacuum, and when the skin puffs up away from the body, you are ready to start preparing your bird.

i have been cooking peking duck for 25years and have never heard anything what you say,on the first cooking at220deg.with a little bit of water in the meat tray that will draw out the fat,and at the end of the cooking the skin will just peel off simular to making pork crackling.i do know some blokes like to use a vacuum cleaner up their ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Whether you have heard of it or not, separating the skin from the fat with air is the standard practice. You can look it up on wiki under the "cooking" paragraph as just one source.

The vacuum cleaner is just a modern convenience which makes it easy for the home cook to do it. Or, as AyG writes above, you can always go old school and use a straw.

my ex from university days (a long time ago), a Beijing native, showed me a different technique... pour boiling water over the skin (2-times) to render it somewhat prior to basting (with a maltose mixture), drying, basting again, drying again, and roasting and basting more. The boiling water shrinks the skin to a tight fit, giving the final product a crispy snap when complete. It also helps the skin separate, but since it's now tight, will not slide off.

Also, no brown sugar in the baste... she used maltose or treacle, rice vinegar, and a little soy sauce.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Peking duck is served in slices, crispy aromatic duck is shredded (usually at the table) and is a Chinese-British invention. For the latter the duck is usually deep fried, making it much quicker to prepare.

Here in Thailand it's normal to eat just the skin of the Peking duck with pancakes. The meat is then served as a separate dish, often stir fried with preserved vegetables.

I just don't get that you would say Peking Duck is a Chinese British invention. Oh all food was invented by the British.

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