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Somtamnication

Xenophobia At Dept. Of Education

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It doesn't forbid loog-krueng from at all, it merely puts them in the same competition category as students enrolled in EP (English Program), MEP (Mini English Program) and GIFTED (talented student) classes.

Admittedly I skim read except for the most pertinent paragraph because I'm using a netbook, but so far as I read it says absolutely nothing about surnames.

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There are other examples of Luk Kruengs being discriminated against.

My mate had his son racing in some Moto X events. He did well and won some races. Once on the podium to accept his trophy people in the crowd were yelling out things like "Check his age" (there is an age limit in the class) and accusing them of cheating to win.

It was common knowlege that some Thais modified their kids bikes beyond the regulations but when my mate did it to his sons (within the regs) there was an outcry.

They are very bad losers when a "foreigner" beats them.

I had the guy commentating say some derogatory remarks as I walked past (I understand enough Thai to know what he was saying) Which everyone got a good laugh out of and could only wonder how that would go if it was an Asian walking past in a Western country event.

I never went again and felt sad for the organizer who was a good guy and who really wanted us and our kids to get involved which we did too.

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My son is 8 with a Thai Mother and an English father who all live together in Thailand.

He goes to school 65km each way a day and we have enrolled him inti the EP and he is now in his second year.

He is a luk krueng and also a 100% Thai citizen.

At school he learns Thai and English and at home he speaks Thai with his Mum and family and I generally speak only English with him.

If there are friends and family around and I say things in English, a lot of the time he will try to translate and tell the others in Thai.

He will tell his Thai uncle who is 16 for me and who speaks virtually no English and he also speaks better English than his aunt who is 19 and going to Uni in BKK.

I think he will survive pretty well in later life.

I am very proud of him.

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It doesn't forbid loog-krueng from at all, it merely puts them in the same competition category as students enrolled in EP (English Program), MEP (Mini English Program) and GIFTED (talented student) classes.

Admittedly I skim read except for the most pertinent paragraph because I'm using a netbook, but so far as I read it says absolutely nothing about surnames.

Yes, that's what I found as well, and that's why I'm still confused as to why the child wasn't allowed to compete.

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Regarding the ongoing debate on the offensiveness of "luuk-kreung": As Katana says, the best translation is indeed "mixed-race". Is that offensive? Is it offensive to be labelled "white" or "old" or "fat"? In my opinion, labeling people based on race, age, sex or physical characteristics isn't offensive at all if it's done in order to differentiate them from a group, and then only if giving them that label is the easiest way to do that. But such labels are offensive, and ignorant, when they're used not to differentiate between people, but to group them together, as if their race, age, sex or physical characteristics somehow make them similar to others who share those traits.

Not offensive: "This hamburger's for the black man at table three."

Offensive: "Look, Mom! That man's black!"

It's not the words that are offensive, it's how they're used. (Somebody please pass this on to the word police over in the USA.) You want to point me out? Go ahead and describe what I look like. But don't think that just because I look like that, it means I'm somehow the same as other folk who look like that. That's what's offensive!

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I’m the farang father of two luuk-kreungs. As will be noted, I take no offence in the words. I am much more likely to say to my wife, “There’s another farang” rather than, “There’s another Caucasian”, or “He looks like a luuk-kreung” rather than, “He looks like a child of a Thai parent and a Caucasian parent”.

My daughters are the only luuk-kreungs in their schools (primary and secondary)…I think they are also the first. I would regard it only fair if their schools excluded them from an English competition – I would only take issue were a child of two Thai parents raised in an English speaking country not also excluded.

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Now you know the rules, use them to your advantage.

Teachers with foreign surnames do not need to attend assembly or get involved in extra ciricular activities ;)

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If the program is that ..... then focus on your child's English abilities at home, or in other areas and ways.. you don't need a contest to prove your child's English abilities.. the bias is out there.. and sadly, your efforts will amount to nothing... yes you will feel better for bringing this to the attention of those in the know.. but focus on the bigger picture for your child's English langauge skills development,

You have a clue of how those grading systems work... why subject your child to that bias?

The other other means to develop use child's English language skill, especially speaking.

Best wishes..

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