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dindong

The Future Of Chiang Rai.

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Roundabout in Thailand... Hahahahaha. Went through a roundabout in phuket near the pier a couple months ago - what a terrible idea.

Shawn

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Reading your posts always brings a smile to my face as an image of Don Quixote comes to mind almost every time.smile.png I just can't figure out who your Sancho Panza might be.wink.png Always entertaining.smile.png

Its clearly Chang35baht laugh.png

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there's a small roundabout where the new glitzy clock tower is. It works moderately well. You can chuckle, but it appears Thais are actually slowing (almost stopping) to allow others the proper 'right of way' at that place. ....more so than they used to, several years ago.

In past years, when I stopped to enable pedestrians to cross, motorcycles would zip by both sides of me, full speed. In recent months, the motorcyclists don't seem to be as hell-bent for leather. Maybe there are some subtle changes for the better: in regard to Chiang Rai driving habits. ....maybe not: (half full or half empty, comes to mind).

p.s. even when I click on the map link in the OP, it still comes out as a horizontal strip of graphic.

Here's what will happen if they build a 'rim road' west of town:

>>> it will be slightly used. In other words, a big waste of money.

>>> They'll probably have to build a new bridge. ....or at least add another one alongside the existing one, by the prison.

>>> Builders will have to negotiate many hills which, as we know, entails massive amounts of scrapping and filling. Environmentally awful.

The ring road at the east of town should be sufficient. There's already a bridge there, It's all flat terrain, and it connects with the airport. To make it more efficient, its north end should swing NW to connect with the super Hwy. (I can't see map, so I don't know what the geniuses at the Roads Dept are planning to do).

If the city fathers do build another bridge, let's hope they get a better designer than the one who designed the new bridge, which goes by the police station. Admittedly, it's a good looking bridge, but they wound up using 3 times as much materials as they needed. Plus, though it appears to be two lanes each way, it's effectively one lane each way. If they had widened it by one or two meters, they would have had a decent two lanes going each direction. As it is, the outside lanes became wide motorbike lanes. Bad and wasteful design, sucking up a billion baht more on materials than needed - money which could have been more sensibly spent elsewhere.

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Unlike the train to Chiang Rai, I am reliably informed that this road is going to happen.

Which road? As I mentioned earlier, the map graphic only loads (for me) as a horizontal strip.

Do you mean the 'ring road' going east side (already partially built)? ....or the one proposed for west side of town?

Unlike the train to Chiang Rai, I am reliably informed that this road is going to happen.

Which road? As I mentioned earlier, the map graphic only loads (for me) as a horizontal strip.

Do you mean the 'ring road' going east side (already partially built)? ....or the one proposed for west side of town?

The loaded map is for the proposed road going west of the town.

http://www.enticcompany.com/chiangrai_web/web/html/map.html

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Thanks for the map's URL. Interesting. Please send all details you have on the map: when it was proposed, how serious you think the city planners are, etc.

It will definately entail building a bridge, probably a four lane one. I am quite familiar with the section of C.Rai where the road would go over the Mae Kok river, and the hilly region north of there. I've secured two properties there, one is exactly between the D and the 10 on the map. The area north of where the bridge would cross is a flood plain, so about 2 to 3 km of the hwy would have to be elevated by 3 to 4 meters above grade. I have another property in Hoy Plakang, which will either be spitting distance from the hwy, or the hwy will ram right through it. If I was Thai, I'd probably be glad to have a major hwy running by my house, as the property value increases. To no one's surprise, I'm not Thai.

Actually, I'd heard of this hwy ten years ago, and even spoke with the surveyors who were plotting it out. I thought C.Rai fathers would have, by now, realized the folly of building it. But, no. What's next, a nuclear power plant at the old airport?

Edited by maidu

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I am very happy with this plan especially if there will be no traffic lights on it.

The eastern ring road( where my property is near) is not going to help the congestion of traffic in Chiang Rai city in the future. Already there is a very long tail back of traffic every morning and evening in this area.

I am hoping that they will have something like this.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring_road

675px-Sheffield_inner_ring-road.png

or this

500px-Capital_Beltway_Map_Color.svg.png

Edited by dindong

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That's interesting comparison. I resided in Washington D.C. until my 23rd year.

I know the beltway very well. It helps for regional traffic, but it's like trying to haul a ton of tacks in a plastic sack.

"No traffic lights on it?" Are you jesting? Thais don't know how to make roads without traffic lights every hundred meters or so. Not only that, they don't know about dedicated turn lanes (with arrow lights) which enable traffic to go both directions at once. If Bkk city planners knew about that, Bkk gridlock would be reduced by 20%.

And don't get me started with the long length of traffic lights, like the new one at the main police station. For each 5 minute cycle, there's about a minute with no vehicles going through. Added up, that's 288 minutes on an average 24 hr. cycle, where there's no traffic moving through the intersection - because of overly long traffic light sequence.

Edited by maidu

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That's interesting comparison. I resided in Washington D.C. until my 23rd year.

I know the beltway very well. It helps for regional traffic, but it's like trying to haul a ton of tacks in a plastic sack.

"No traffic lights on it?" Are you jesting? Thais don't know how to make roads without traffic lights every hundred meters or so. Not only that, they don't know about dedicated turn lanes (with arrow lights) which enable traffic to go both directions at once. If Bkk city planners knew about that, Bkk gridlock would be reduced by 20%.

And don't get me started with the long length of traffic lights, like the new one at the main police station. For each 5 minute cycle, there's about a minute with no vehicles going through. Added up, that's 288 minutes on an average 24 hr. cycle, where there's no traffic moving through the intersection - because of overly long traffic light sequence.

I have yet to see even 5 seconds at lights with no vehicle going through.....even when the lights are red.

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That's interesting comparison. I resided in Washington D.C. until my 23rd year.

I know the beltway very well. It helps for regional traffic, but it's like trying to haul a ton of tacks in a plastic sack.

"No traffic lights on it?" Are you jesting? Thais don't know how to make roads without traffic lights every hundred meters or so. Not only that, they don't know about dedicated turn lanes (with arrow lights) which enable traffic to go both directions at once. If Bkk city planners knew about that, Bkk gridlock would be reduced by 20%.

And don't get me started with the long length of traffic lights, like the new one at the main police station. For each 5 minute cycle, there's about a minute with no vehicles going through. Added up, that's 288 minutes on an average 24 hr. cycle, where there's no traffic moving through the intersection - because of overly long traffic light sequence.

I have yet to see even 5 seconds at lights with no vehicle going through.....even when the lights are red.

That's interesting comparison. I resided in Washington D.C. until my 23rd year.

I know the beltway very well. It helps for regional traffic, but it's like trying to haul a ton of tacks in a plastic sack.

"No traffic lights on it?" Are you jesting? Thais don't know how to make roads without traffic lights every hundred meters or so. Not only that, they don't know about dedicated turn lanes (with arrow lights) which enable traffic to go both directions at once. If Bkk city planners knew about that, Bkk gridlock would be reduced by 20%.

And don't get me started with the long length of traffic lights, like the new one at the main police station. For each 5 minute cycle, there's about a minute with no vehicles going through. Added up, that's 288 minutes on an average 24 hr. cycle, where there's no traffic moving through the intersection - because of overly long traffic light sequence.

I have yet to see even 5 seconds at lights with no vehicle going through.....even when the lights are red.

smile.png

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I don't think many of us need to worry too much about this ringroad to the west of the city.

They started the one that goes on the eastern side of CR more than 12 years ago and they are not halfway done so far.

It will probably take another 10 years before that one is connected to the Superhighway both in the north and in the south.

And I don't think they will start with the other ringroad until the first one is finished and the second one will probably

take another 30 year to build.

The problem I see in Chiang Rai, beside that traffic is hardly moving in daytime, is there are no parking places.

We have probably 3 times more cars and motorbikes going to town today compared to 10 years ago and the only parkingplaces

that been created/built is around Big C and Central Plaza.

So people doubblepark everywhere and that does not help the speed of the traffic.

That is good for Big C and Central because people that want to go shopping prefere a place where they can park their car.

But not so good for the shops in the city.

When can we hope for a good system with public buses?

Another problem is that so many secondary and high schools are in the city and that cause a lot of problem

with all motorbikes and with parents in cars dropping and picking up their children.

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It's difficult to view that the map on the bypass website as the image is cut into slices. I've saved it as a (6Mb) PDF to make it more user-friendly.

CEI Western Bypass

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double post

Edited by sceadugenga

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I don't think many of us need to worry too much about this ringroad to the west of the city.

They started the one that goes on the eastern side of CR more than 12 years ago and they are not halfway done so far.

It will probably take another 10 years before that one is connected to the Superhighway both in the north and in the south.

And I don't think they will start with the other ringroad until the first one is finished and the second one will probably

take another 30 year to build.

The problem I see in Chiang Rai, beside that traffic is hardly moving in daytime, is there are no parking places.

We have probably 3 times more cars and motorbikes going to town today compared to 10 years ago and the only parkingplaces

that been created/built is around Big C and Central Plaza.

So people doubblepark everywhere and that does not help the speed of the traffic.

That is good for Big C and Central because people that want to go shopping prefere a place where they can park their car.

But not so good for the shops in the city.

When can we hope for a good system with public buses?

Another problem is that so many secondary and high schools are in the city and that cause a lot of problem

with all motorbikes and with parents in cars dropping and picking up their children.

How true.

Good post Sven.

thumbsup.gif

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So people doubblepark everywhere and that does not help the speed of the traffic.

In Thailand, if you have a new looking car and leave your emergency lights flashing, then you're less likely to get a ticket for double parking. Of course, it also helps if the cops on the beat know you. Note: you're very much more likely to get a parking ticket if parked badly within a few blocks of the main police station. Guess why.

Also: I had all lug nuts taken off a front wheel of my beat-up pick up truck. It was parked by the Search & Rescue post, at the corner by the old bus station. A Tuk Tuk driver must have done it, perhaps thinking I was parked in a taxi space (I wasn't, and many other cars park there, on and off, daily). Plus, I noticed at least 10 empty spaces that day, along the tuk tuk stretch of street.

Luckily, I was driving slowly, when my front wheel came off. The truck ground to an immediate halt, and the loose wheel went rolling 60 meters down the street. It could have been much worse. I haven't even gone back to try and confront the Tuk Tuk drivers - wouldn't accomplish anything except make them angry and more vengeful. Some of them are friendly acquaintances of mine, actually. So it goes. Notch it up as another interesting experience of Chiang Rai.

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Chiang Rai tastes the future

CHIANG RAI, 22 August 2012: This far north town is about to be invaded by a horde of commuter vans and tour buses, 27 August, as more than 1,700 secondary school teachers meet for the their annual conference.

“We are going to see traffic jams,” warned Dusit Island Resort’s general manager, Mana Chanhorm, “Already hotels are filling up and we are expecting a full-house for the week beginning 27 August.”

Visions of Chiang Rai’s narrow streets overrun by fleets of Toyota Commuter vans may stretch the imagination of the town’s residents who take pride in their town’s laidback lifestyle and the province’s Lanna culture.

inisde-no.1-Chiang-Rais-paddy-field-on-the-mountain.jpg

Chiang Rai’s paddy field on the mountain

Just 220 km down the road is Chiang Mai, fast becoming a mirror of Bangkok with pollution, traffic jams, massive shopping malls and a profusion of urban entertainment.

In contrast, Chiang Rai tags itself “City of Artists”, noting that many of the country’s top artists settled here to get away from the hurly burly of the Thai capital and other commercially driven provincial towns.

But the arrival of 1,700 school teachers for their annual gig is an indicator that Chiang Rai is embracing change.

http://www.ttrweekly.com/site/2012/08/chiang-rai-tastes-the-future/

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