Jump to content

The Future Of Chiang Rai.


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 47
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I had all lug nuts taken off a front wheel of my beat-up pick up truck. It was parked by the Search & Rescue post, at the corner by the old bus station. A Tuk Tuk driver must have done it ..

.. the Tuk Tuk drivers - wouldn't accomplish anything except make them angry and more vengeful. Some of them are friendly acquaintances of mine, actually.

One can only wonder what actions might be undertaken by the ones who are not 'friendly' .. whistling.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites
I had all lug nuts taken off a front wheel of my beat-up pick up truck. It was parked by the Search & Rescue post, at the corner by the old bus station. A Tuk Tuk driver must have done it ..

.. the Tuk Tuk drivers - wouldn't accomplish anything except make them angry and more vengeful. Some of them are friendly acquaintances of mine, actually.

One can only wonder what actions might be undertaken by the ones who are not 'friendly' .. whistling.gif

am not sure exactly what you mean. But it's clear that humans are a very subjective species, to a fault. If they don't know someone, they assume bad things. If they know someone, they assume good things.

Example: a married couple are going out, and need a babysitter for their two young kids. They'll pick 'Helen' (even though she's proven to be inept) because they 'know' her. But they won't pick 'Sally' because they don't 'know' her, It could well be that Sally would prove to be a much better baby sitter than Helen, but it's the 'knowing' that draws people to those they're familiar with, including bending over backwards to justify all the nutty things the familiar people do - while assuming bad traits regarding people they're not familiar with.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I’m not so sure about Chiang Rai being the “City of Artists”. Sure we have Chalermchai Kasitpipat at Wat Rong Khun, Thawan Duchanee at Baandam Museum, as he calls it, or Somluk Pantiboon at Doy Din Dang Pottery, but one doesn’t get the same artistic vibe one finds so easily in Chiang Mai. Most shops and displays are quite utilitarian and lack much in the way of flair or charm. We are starting to get a facelift in some areas of Chiang Rai but often the flair is not local grown and comes from those migrating from places like Bangkok, looking for a less urban yet stylish lifestyle. I for one enjoy watching our little town grow up.smile.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m not so sure about Chiang Rai being the “City of Artists”. Sure we have Chalermchai Kasitpipat at Wat Rong Khun, Thawan Duchanee at Baandam Museum, as he calls it, or Somluk Pantiboon at Doy Din Dang Pottery, but one doesn’t get the same artistic vibe one finds so easily in Chiang Mai. Most shops and displays are quite utilitarian and lack much in the way of flair or charm. We are starting to get a facelift in some areas of Chiang Rai but often the flair is not local grown and comes from those migrating from places like Bangkok, looking for a less urban yet stylish lifestyle. I for one enjoy watching our little town grow up.smile.png

That's interesting. When I started doing some research on Chiang Rai, that white temple, Wat Rong Khun, stood out as being quite amazing and unique. When I later discovered the entire project was the brain-child of a Thai artist who had funded the project from his own resources, I was even more impressed.

That's the style of a true artist. One makes lots of money through the sale of regular paintings (and presumably sound investments), then one uses that money to produce a more magnificant piece of art, an entire temple.

When I visit Chiang Rai, some time towards the end of the year, I'll make a bee-line for this temple, with camera in hand. biggrin.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m not so sure about Chiang Rai being the “City of Artists”. Sure we have Chalermchai Kasitpipat at Wat Rong Khun, Thawan Duchanee at Baandam Museum, as he calls it, or Somluk Pantiboon at Doy Din Dang Pottery, but one doesn’t get the same artistic vibe one finds so easily in Chiang Mai. Most shops and displays are quite utilitarian and lack much in the way of flair or charm. We are starting to get a facelift in some areas of Chiang Rai but often the flair is not local grown and comes from those migrating from places like Bangkok, looking for a less urban yet stylish lifestyle. I for one enjoy watching our little town grow up.smile.png

That's interesting. When I started doing some research on Chiang Rai, that white temple, Wat Rong Khun, stood out as being quite amazing and unique. When I later discovered the entire project was the brain-child of a Thai artist who had funded the project from his own resources, I was even more impressed.

That's the style of a true artist. One makes lots of money through the sale of regular paintings (and presumably sound investments), then one uses that money to produce a more magnificant piece of art, an entire temple.

When I visit Chiang Rai, some time towards the end of the year, I'll make a bee-line for this temple, with camera in hand. biggrin.png

The White Temple is a must see for visitors to Chiang Rai but be prepared for it to be very crowded and commercial. Be sure to visit Baandam Museum as a counterbalance to the brashness of Wat Rong Khun.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m not so sure about Chiang Rai being the “City of Artists”. Sure we have Chalermchai Kasitpipat at Wat Rong Khun, Thawan Duchanee at Baandam Museum, as he calls it, or Somluk Pantiboon at Doy Din Dang Pottery, but one doesn’t get the same artistic vibe one finds so easily in Chiang Mai. Most shops and displays are quite utilitarian and lack much in the way of flair or charm. We are starting to get a facelift in some areas of Chiang Rai but often the flair is not local grown and comes from those migrating from places like Bangkok, looking for a less urban yet stylish lifestyle. I for one enjoy watching our little town grow up.smile.png

That's interesting. When I started doing some research on Chiang Rai, that white temple, Wat Rong Khun, stood out as being quite amazing and unique. When I later discovered the entire project was the brain-child of a Thai artist who had funded the project from his own resources, I was even more impressed.

That's the style of a true artist. One makes lots of money through the sale of regular paintings (and presumably sound investments), then one uses that money to produce a more magnificant piece of art, an entire temple.

When I visit Chiang Rai, some time towards the end of the year, I'll make a bee-line for this temple, with camera in hand. biggrin.png

The White Temple is a must see for visitors to Chiang Rai but be prepared for it to be very crowded and commercial. Be sure to visit Baandam Museum as a counterbalance to the brashness of Wat Rong Khun.

How about I get up before dawn. Will it be crowded so early? I could get some interesting effects of the rising sun on the white temple spires. biggrin.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m not so sure about Chiang Rai being the “City of Artists”. Sure we have Chalermchai Kasitpipat at Wat Rong Khun, Thawan Duchanee at Baandam Museum, as he calls it, or Somluk Pantiboon at Doy Din Dang Pottery, but one doesn’t get the same artistic vibe one finds so easily in Chiang Mai. Most shops and displays are quite utilitarian and lack much in the way of flair or charm. We are starting to get a facelift in some areas of Chiang Rai but often the flair is not local grown and comes from those migrating from places like Bangkok, looking for a less urban yet stylish lifestyle. I for one enjoy watching our little town grow up.smile.png

That's interesting. When I started doing some research on Chiang Rai, that white temple, Wat Rong Khun, stood out as being quite amazing and unique. When I later discovered the entire project was the brain-child of a Thai artist who had funded the project from his own resources, I was even more impressed.

That's the style of a true artist. One makes lots of money through the sale of regular paintings (and presumably sound investments), then one uses that money to produce a more magnificant piece of art, an entire temple.

When I visit Chiang Rai, some time towards the end of the year, I'll make a bee-line for this temple, with camera in hand. biggrin.png

The White Temple is a must see for visitors to Chiang Rai but be prepared for it to be very crowded and commercial. Be sure to visit Baandam Museum as a counterbalance to the brashness of Wat Rong Khun.

How about I get up before dawn. Will it be crowded so early? I could get some interesting effects of the rising sun on the white temple spires. biggrin.png

That would probably work if you timed it just right. With the front of the Temple oriented toward the East you stand of chance of nice morning light coming over your shoulder, if there is no morning fog.thumbsup.gif Edited by villagefarang
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is anyones guess what Chiang Rai will look like in the future. Plans come and go so I put off judgement until I actually see what happens, but it can be fun to listen to people tell you the train will run through their land or what devastating effects development will have on Chiang Rai. I seem to remember a lot of gloom and doomers decrying the evils of Central Plaza. I figure you either embrace change and move on, or end up fighting a loosing battle.

+1 thumbsup.gif

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is anyones guess what Chiang Rai will look like in the future. Plans come and go so I put off judgement until I actually see what happens, but it can be fun to listen to people tell you the train will run through their land or what devastating effects development will have on Chiang Rai. I seem to remember a lot of gloom and doomers decrying the evils of Central Plaza. I figure you either embrace change and move on, or end up fighting a loosing battle.

+1 thumbsup.gif

A little early in the day to have run out of "Likes".thumbsup.gif
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is anyones guess what Chiang Rai will look like in the future. Plans come and go so I put off judgement until I actually see what happens, but it can be fun to listen to people tell you the train will run through their land or what devastating effects development will have on Chiang Rai. I seem to remember a lot of gloom and doomers decrying the evils of Central Plaza. I figure you either embrace change and move on, or end up fighting a loosing battle.

+1 thumbsup.gif

A little early in the day to have run out of "Likes".thumbsup.gif

Well spotted!

I think they run in a 24 hour cycle and mine ran out a couple of hours back.

Better start lobbying for more again

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...