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Richie1971

Building A Small Village Shop - Cost

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OP don't waste your time or money, if your in laws had wanted a shop they would have opened one.

You will pay to make and stock, they will sell and spend. When all the stock is gone there will be no money to re stock, it's the Thai way and that's why little shops, noddle bars etc pop up and disappear.

Better to just send them money to live if they can't work, all these schemes are just away of justifying helping out the in laws. Jim

way to much generalization there jim

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Thai's are reluctant to support a small at home enterprise, if a farang lives with the owner.

Not true,it works the other way also.

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Most people buy in bulk at a local wholesaler, one of the big rip offs is a "Fridge". they never think through the cost of a MUST HAVE A FRIDGE and the return of kleeping things cold.

My in-laws use ice boxes, ice truck comes through every second day, they buy ice, keep things cold.

MUCH cheaper,

She has a noodle shop, very profitable, more so than having to re-sell things from a wholesaler, but you have to be a good cook to make it work and have no competition around.

Some wholesalers deliver. That works too, otherwise sometimes a trip to Macro you see people stocking up for the small village shops too.

Teaching people the basics of business is a good idea, sometimes they are keen, my in-laws where, they just need a few 1000's baht to get going and are totally self sufficient, so I had no problems helping them get going, and give a few tips on how to price things, and she is very popular in the village.

Why not? Kee Neo Farang!

My fridges where free one from Pepsi and 1 from coca cola also the trick is to use your shop as the main source for all the other little shops to buy from ....basically overpower them and give a wide variety of goods for the locals and children......it is also good as you say to have food on the go either rice or noodles or both.

Meat is a good seller and vegetables from the garden in the AM.

Basically a village shop here is an investment for years and an income even if it is small....nobody opens a shop if you are a farang and think you are going to get rich here,it is enjoyable at times but also hard work and the avenue to speak Thai is open wide for you.

If you can earn anything over 20.000 baht a month you are doing very well.

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Here in Ubon, it looks to me like every 4 th house has some sort of shop. The truth be told most of these shops are selling exactly the same thing as the other shops.

I think the big problem is the lack of a proper old age pension system here in Thailand. Too many people opening shops to keep busy and to support them

because they have difficulty due to their old age. Thais need to earn a larger salary so they can invest the extra money for their retirement.

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It all depends if you are there being involved(living on the premises)and if the family are really interested of course....going buying you will know very quickly if your Mrs and the family has good intentions,this is hard work and a commitment like some mornings waking at 4am to go buying or in the evening going to places like Makro after you close the shop!

I would advise anybody to trial it first then see what input and output (money taken for the family)is to see if you enjoy working this lifestyle.

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Also even in the villages there is a difference between a mama papa pension shop(as mentioned above) and a real shop that sells everything and is fully stocked regularly.....not just selling knum,beer and whiskey an cigs.

Also as mentioned earlier you do have to have a book and be very clear on payment,we give one week and strictly tell anybody that they have to pay or no more credit.

Your Mrs has to be a strong personality in the local community for this to work.

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OP don't waste your time or money, if your in laws had wanted a shop they would have opened one.

You will pay to make and stock, they will sell and spend. When all the stock is gone there will be no money to re stock, it's the Thai way and that's why little shops, noddle bars etc pop up and disappear.

Better to just send them money to live if they can't work, all these schemes are just away of justifying helping out the in laws. Jim

way to much generalization there jim

Not really, if the in laws had wanted a house shop they stick out a table and sell things, no real investment required and I have yet to hear of a farang sending money to set something up and it worked.

If the in laws were go getters and had a real interest in doing a business, they would already have a business.

Happy to be corrected by others who have sent money to set up small businesses and they worked, but seen the tractor deals, farang buys tractor, in laws will live happy ever after on the income. 6 months later tractor is rusting in a field or has been sold. etc etc.

Think if you don't work for it yourself, it's easy come easy go. Jim

With all respect Jim setting a stall up outside your home to me is not a shop and nothing like having a business,as you say it is common sense really if you had a business anywhere in the world and just supported it it by sending money ....it would not last long would it wink.png ,anybody who does this like you say becomes another story of loss and woe but that is more common if they are playing at it and not seriously involved.

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I think Jims comments are 'spot on' having experienced the problems he has detailed personally (unfortunetly).

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It all depends if you are there being involved(living on the premises)and if the family are really interested of course....going buying you will know very quickly if your Mrs and the family has good intentions,this is hard work and a commitment like some mornings waking at 4am to go buying or in the evening going to places like Makro after you close the shop!

I would advise anybody to trial it first then see what input and output (money taken for the family)is to see if you enjoy working this lifestyle.

You are talking 2 totally different enterprises, one with a farang watching over, ergo a farang run shop and the other sending money for Ma and Pa to set up a shop, they have no experience and have never tried before. Not doubt rice farmers who were happy to put in the hard work for the rice season, then swing in a hammock for the rest of the year. They are not going to suddenly become work alcoholics and develop booking skills overnight.

As said before happy to be corrected, I would love to hear a story where it worked, but in my 10 years, never seen a farang bought business run without a farang presence. Jim

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If you want to fund your in-laws give them 2kbht a month.

Enough to live on, and they can't keep asking you to bail them out, like they would when the shop fails.

Also you get to keep control of your capital, the in-laws, and thereby your wife.

As for the shop setup costs ....... depends entirely on your resemblance to a buffalo.

Edited by TommoPhysicist
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If you want to fund your in-laws give them 2kbht a month.

Enough to live on, and they can't keep asking you to bail them out, like they would when the shop fails.

Also you get to keep control of your capital, the in-laws, and thereby your wife.

As for the shop setup costs ....... depends entirely on your resemblance to a buffalo.

Oh dear. What a sad outlook on things.

I set up a small business for my wife. Those of you who live in Buriram will probably know me and the company.

I do have some input, usually keeping the website up to date, checking orders and doing some deliveries( my wife cannot drive a car yet). I have not been involved financially for over 2 and a half years.

I am proud to say that the company is running as strong as ever after just over 3 years in business.

As has previously been said, white man overseeing wife Vs absentee funding elderly uneducated farmers are two completely different games.

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OP don't waste your time or money, if your in laws had wanted a shop they would have opened one.

You will pay to make and stock, they will sell and spend. When all the stock is gone there will be no money to re stock, it's the Thai way and that's why little shops, noddle bars etc pop up and disappear.

Better to just send them money to live if they can't work, all these schemes are just away of justifying helping out the in laws. Jim

way to much generalization there jim

Not really, if the in laws had wanted a house shop they stick out a table and sell things, no real investment required and I have yet to hear of a farang sending money to set something up and it worked.

If the in laws were go getters and had a real interest in doing a business, they would already have a business.

Happy to be corrected by others who have sent money to set up small businesses and they worked, but seen the tractor deals, farang buys tractor, in laws will live happy ever after on the income. 6 months later tractor is rusting in a field or has been sold. etc etc.

Think if you don't work for it yourself, it's easy come easy go. Jim

But in the OPs original post Jim we learn that his GFs parents are farmers, but are getting too old for the fields. They prefer farming to running a shop, presumably, but now they need to find something else to fill their time.

If the alternative were just giving them some money to sit on their bums I would prefer to give them something to do. The points about giving stuff away free is a good point though. I would not want to be funding free-loaders in the village. My village is different and is a bit more affluent than the ones stuck way out in the sticks, so a well-thought out shop could work well (with passing trade on the main road too). My in-laws make a subsistence living from both farming and selling bagged curries in the local markets in the evening (mother and sisters are good Issaan cooks). They are no fools - they give nothing away for free except maybe the odd bit of unsold food.

Just goes to show that you cant generalise and each situation needs to be thought through carefullyon its own merits with lots of questioning and observation first. I`m sure that the likes of Tommo thinks anyone who would fund the ILs is a mug. Fair enough - I would never advocate putting yourself into dire straits just because of any pressure that might come form the family. Myself, I think the Western culture that spreads families to the four winds and provides little financial or emotional support from family members upwards to the getting-poorer-oldies is more repulsive than the culture that sees daughters families providing upwards support.

Edited by SantiSuk
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