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Toeic Test For Workpermit Renewal


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I am a South African citizen teaching in Thailand. When I got my work permit, in December 2011, South Africans were still seen as native speakers. With the new legislation, passed in February 2012, South Africans are now no longer seen as native speakers (an insult that many of us have a hard time swallowing) and need to pass the TOEIC test in order to obtain a work permit.

My one year visa (and therefore also my work permit) expires on the 30th of November and I am going to be applying for a renewal as I am still with the same company. I would like to know the following:

Will I now need to complete the TOEIC test before I can renew my work permit or does the fact that my work permit was obtained before this requirement came into effect mean that I won't have to do the TOEIC test? I understand that I will need to pass the TOEIC test if I want to change jobs and have to apply for a NEW work permit, but in this case I am simply going to be renewing my existing work permit.

If anyone knows anything about this I would really appreciate any advice you can give as I really don't want to have to spend the money on doing the TOEIC test unless I really have to.

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Hey man.. I am a south African too. I was told to do the Toeic test in order for me to obtain a work permit. This is Thailand man and it is only getting harder and harder for "non native" speakers, so it is always helpful and wise to get as much documents as possible.. Hahaha. The Toeic test is extremely easy, you don't have to study for it

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I don't believe the TOEIC test is for the work eprmit, rahter it is for a teacher license (waiver). The new rules from the teachers council require the TOEIC for non-native speakers.

As this is more specific related to teachers, I move the topic to there.

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I don't believe the TOEIC test is for the work eprmit, rahter it is for a teacher license (waiver). The new rules from the teachers council require the TOEIC for non-native speakers.

As this is more specific related to teachers, I move the topic to there.

Yes, the TOEIC, TOEFL or IELTS test for non-native speakers of English is a part of the requirements for the provisional teaching permit set by The Teachers' Council of Thailand. However, it's reported that both Immigration and Labour adopted this requirement, besides the degree requirement, in case application for a provisional teaching permit hasn't taken place yet. Obviously, this all for working in basic education schools.

Edited by aidenai
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Yes i can confirm that too. A friend of mine, non native speaker, recently had to submit her IELTS to both immigration and labor department.

Its interesting that the Thai authorities took SA off the list, i might add that they just placed Ireland on the list of countries that dont need the TOEIC or IELTS anymore so up until recently a country where 100% of the population spoke English was seen by the Thai authorities as non native speakers. I might also add that i dont believe that any thai department, Immigration or Labor even, knew that.

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Doing the test is one thing, but what are the actual scores required to qualify for the teacher's licence? Surely there is some minimum set standard.

The TCT is mentioning a passing score. Funnily, TOEIC, TOEFL and IELTS tests don't recognise passing scores.

However, teachers are mentioning a score of more than 600 on the TOEIC tests. Equivalent to 5.5 on IELTS and 513 on TOEFL Paper.

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Nothing personal to our SA brothers and sisters. But, I rate their English as the second most difficult English to understand, second to the Scots.

My own informal worthless poll:

Top to bottom, top being most difficult.

1. Scotland

2. South African

3. Liverpool

4. Nigerian

5. TN and Mississippi English

6. New Jersey (US)

7. SE England

8. Mid US

9. California

10. My own biggrin.png

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Nothing personal to our SA brothers and sisters. But, I rate their English as the second most difficult English to understand, second to the Scots.

My own informal worthless poll:

Top to bottom, top being most difficult.

1. Scotland

2. South African

3. Liverpool

4. Nigerian

5. TN and Mississippi English

6. New Jersey (US)

7. SE England

8. Mid US

9. California

10. My own biggrin.png

Australia not on your list? happy22.gif
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Nothing personal to our SA brothers and sisters. But, I rate their English as the second most difficult English to understand, second to the Scots.

My own informal worthless poll:

Top to bottom, top being most difficult.

1. Scotland

2. South African

3. Liverpool

4. Nigerian

5. TN and Mississippi English

6. New Jersey (US)

7. SE England

8. Mid US

9. California

10. My own biggrin.png

Australia not on your list? happy22.gif

Though I fail to understand how "here" is spoken as "hee", I can understand our Aussies and Kiwis. smile.png

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Doing the test is one thing, but what are the actual scores required to qualify for the teacher's licence? Surely there is some minimum set standard.

The TCT is mentioning a passing score. Funnily, TOEIC, TOEFL and IELTS tests don't recognise passing scores.

However, teachers are mentioning a score of more than 600 on the TOEIC tests. Equivalent to 5.5 on IELTS and 513 on TOEFL Paper.

OK thanks, that shouldn't be too difficult for competent non-native speakers. I've had a number of EP M6 students get over 6.5 average for IELTS, and one got 8. So if the students can do it (get 5,.5), its only fair the teachers can too, especially those teaching english to upper mathyom.

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Nothing personal to our SA brothers and sisters. But, I rate their English as the second most difficult English to understand, second to the Scots.

My own informal worthless poll:

Top to bottom, top being most difficult.

1. Scotland

2. South African

3. Liverpool

4. Nigerian

5. TN and Mississippi English

6. New Jersey (US)

7. SE England

8. Mid US

9. California

10. My own biggrin.png

Australia not on your list? happy22.gif

Though I fail to understand how "here" is spoken as "hee", I can understand our Aussies and Kiwis. smile.png

competent dutch / swedish etc, would be at 11+. I've met some with flawless 'international' BBC accents whistling.gif

Edited by culicine
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Ireland had always been on the list of native English speaking countries. However, in April of this year it was decided to remove Ireland from the list. They realized the mistake after receiving a multitude of complaints and changed it back in September.

I heard that Irish passport holders are classified as 'non native speakers'. An utter joke!!!

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Nothing personal to our SA brothers and sisters. But, I rate their English as the second most difficult English to understand, second to the Scots.

My own informal worthless poll:

Top to bottom, top being most difficult.

1. Scotland

2. South African

3. Liverpool

4. Nigerian

5. TN and Mississippi English

6. New Jersey (US)

7. SE England

8. Mid US

9. California

10. My own biggrin.png

Swap Scotland with Liverpool, Liverpool is the most dreadful accent I have ever heard, and so hard to understand, especially the high pitched male voices. Do you remember the scouse soap Brookside? I rest my case.
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Nothing personal to our SA brothers and sisters. But, I rate their English as the second most difficult English to understand, second to the Scots.

My own informal worthless poll:

Top to bottom, top being most difficult.

1. Scotland

2. South African

3. Liverpool

4. Nigerian

5. TN and Mississippi English

6. New Jersey (US)

7. SE England

8. Mid US

9. California

10. My own biggrin.png

Just swap 9 & 10 and your list would be perfectly correct. wink.png

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