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BANGKOK 23 May 2019 08:03
Dutchbike

A Tribute To 2 Strokes

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Living in this amazing country for over 2 years now, and in this time i developed a big passion for the dying race of small displacement 2 stroke sport bikes.

I don’t know why, I’m already in my late forties and these kind of bikes are more mend for the younger generations of starting bikers, but maybe it’s got something to do with the fact I always was fascinated with these kind of bikes but never got to it to buy one in my home country, apart from some 2 stroke mopeds and a couple of dirt bikes in my youth, the rest of my motorcycle career I drove 4 strokes.

Well, when I moved over to live in Thailand I made up for all those lost years and already got 4 of those Thai made smokers.

I must have been a nice time in Thailand ( at least, when you’re into bikes) with all those 2 strokes screaming around but somewhere in the end of the 90’s it all changed and from then on 4 strokes rule this country.

I’ve red and heard various reasons the 2 strokes were sort of banned, one interesting theory is that at some point the King was bored with all those 2 strokes leaving big clouds of smoke near his palace, he had a talk with AP Honda and that’s how it’s all started.

At an environmental point of view it’s much better but the streets became more boring.

The remains of that 2 stroke era are still around but disappearing in a fast rate. They end up as driving food stalls ( with sidecars), shabby run around bikes ( many times driven by an elderly Thai at very low speeds) or just parked in a yard and left there to rust.

For a reason I don’t understand they don’t seem to appeal to the youngsters anymore, the only 2 stroke which is still popular is the Honda Dash. But most of them prefer Clicks, Finos and all the other 4 stroke bikes. Mayby it has something to do with the very bad fuel economy and the fact they need a bit more attention then the hassle free 4 stroke.

They always say that a 2 stroke is a simple design, it is, but…. those 150 cc’s need a good set up (carb/mixture/exhaust/ignition/powervalve) to run perfect and well… that’s a thing not many Thai take put an effort in.

When there is a thread about 2 strokes on Thaivisa I can see there are more people like me, loving those smokers!!!

Take a well set up 150 cc bike out for a spin and you’re “lost” forever ( at least I was) laughing at a similar 150 cc 4 stroke and even 250 cc’s 4 strokes.

Ok, there’s no torque and you have got to keep the revs up, but these little bikes give so much joy.

To finish this little tribute ( just felt like writing a little story and share my passion) there still out there: the Honda NSR 150’s ( RR and SP) the Yamaha’s TZR and TZM 150’s the Kawasaki’s KRR’s 150 and even the occasional Suzuki Gamma’s and not to mention the older air cooled 2 strokes ( Yamaha’s RXZ, Kawa’s GTO’s and so on)

I would say: grab one before it’s too late, there mostly not expensive, parts are easy and cheap available and there sooooo much fun to ride.

Keep the smokers alive.

Dutchbike.

post-143096-0-73723100-1354707034_thumb.

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Nice little write up.

I had a TDR 250 for a good few years here, mostly spent in bits in my garage. But when it did go, it went well.

I miss it.

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2 strokes rock wink.png

EPA killed them

GP500 & GP250 was excellent in those days.

As was MX

But, Even now someone is making a

500cc V4

Over 200 Horsepower

248 pound 2 stroke

http://www.asphaltan...500-factory-v4/

Edited by mania

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had an excellently maintained honda nsr 250rr for about 10 years.

Was as fast as my vfr 400 r

looked alot like this. same paint minus the flouro green

8336.jpg

sold em both a year ago.

Still regret it.

Edited by tinfoilhat
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The market killed two-strokes in Thailand. Most people buying bikes in Thailand are buying them as primary transpiration. Four-strokes are more reliable, cleaner and quieter.

I saw a graph about 10 years ago that showed market share of H, Y, K & S, they were all about even at first, then Honda introduced a little four-stroke and their market share skyrocketed to over 60% of the market in just a a few years.

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The market killed two-strokes in Thailand. Most people buying bikes in Thailand are buying them as primary transpiration. Four-strokes are more reliable, cleaner and quieter.

I saw a graph about 10 years ago that showed market share of H, Y, K & S, they were all about even at first, then Honda introduced a little four-stroke and their market share skyrocketed to over 60% of the market in just a a few years.

Nah it was the EPA in the 70's & 80's

Honda introduced 4 strokes well before that.

I think the Honda Super cub came out in the 50's

I know as a kid (before 1970 ) I had many Honda 50 engines I moved from bike to bike.

They use to cost me about $35-$50 bucks back then

They had 3 speed semi-automatic trannies.

I actually think/hope 2 strokes may come back because they have now solved

the EPA problem & can keep oil out of the combustion & thereby the exhaust.

Edited by mania

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The market killed two-strokes in Thailand. Most people buying bikes in Thailand are buying them as primary transpiration. Four-strokes are more reliable, cleaner and quieter.

I saw a graph about 10 years ago that showed market share of H, Y, K & S, they were all about even at first, then Honda introduced a little four-stroke and their market share skyrocketed to over 60% of the market in just a a few years.

Nah it was the EPA in the 70's & 80's

Honda introduced 4 strokes well before that.

I think the Honda Super cub came out in the 50's

I know as a kid (before 1970 ) I had many Honda 50 engines I moved from bike to bike.

They use to cost me about $35-$50 bucks back then

They had 3 speed semi-automatic trannies.

I actually think/hope 2 strokes may come back because they have now solved

the EPA problem & can keep oil out of the combustion & thereby the exhaust.

The EPA in Thailand in the 70s and 80s?

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Ok, there’s no torque and you have got to keep the revs up, but these little bikes give so much joy.

There is lots of torquethumbsup.gif The problem is finding it. smile.png

There are more two-strokes around than one thinks. They are mostly out at night, racingohmy.png

SURGEON GENERAL: IT IS OK TO SMOKE, THE OPPOSITION WITH TWO_STROKE POWER!

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my first geared bike was a yamaha dt125 cross which was a two stroke machine. I never forget my days on it when i was too young!!! Before that i was riding two stroke mopeds like 75cc and 100 cc which i learned riding on them!

I also rode other two stroke bikes like Yamah rx100, Yamaha rx135, yamaha rxz - it was a fast bike man - and Honda nsr150 proarm here in Thailand for a short amount of time to test it.

They were good bikes but the inefficiency and tree cutter ways of them are unacceptable especially if you think the level of engineering now and higher petrol prices.

I think right now only Aprilia has one 2 stroker and i heard some new might come with some improved environmental friendly engines. Lets see.

Edited by loserlazer

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Have to agree that there is something about two strokes which never quite leaves you. I often get the urge to try and locate the two-stroke bikes I used to ride as a teenager, both of which were powered by a Villiers 250cc two-stroke twin engine.

Being an apprentice, I couldn't afford much in the way of anything, so into the tank would go just about any mixture I could scrounge from my workplace (plus of course a little petrol) and that included gearbox oil from large trucks and molybdenum disulphide chain lubrication fluid!! Despite this horrible mixture, the engines went well enough, although they gave out very thick plumes of smoke and rarely got above 65 miles an hour which was more than enough to get me to and from my workplace.

However, as they say, nostalgia is a thing of the past and my little Honda Click does a great job for me now.

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My first ever bike was an yamaha rd 125,bought 2 nd hand Age 17 ,didn't even know how to ride when I bought it but boy when you hit the powerband that thing was crazy ,can't remember exactly but sure it used to hit 90 mph with no problem ,kind of puts the 250 4 strokes off today to shame.

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In my 30,s i had a tuned LC 350 yamaha and a 750 suzuki triple both with expansion chambers...i used to burst every ones eardrums, Wish i still had them but later i got seduced by the kawasaki Z1000 A2 and put a yoshimura 4 into 1 pipe on and was again happy.

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Grew up with 2 strokes, first bike was a NSU Quickly with no exhaust that I used to ride around the fields on, then BSA Bantam scrambler (fields again), then Gilera mopeds (when 16yr old)...then Suzuki GT250B...then RD350B...then brace of RD350LC's. Only got into 4 strokes when got into Enduro riding but the love is still there...even now I still cover the clutch lever with two fingers "just in case" tongue.png

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