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Hi-So Holidays Harder To Afford For Phuket Tourists

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Isn't England the place with never ending rain and grey skies? (At least it is in most movies :-)

Yes, and the smog - don't forget the smog. And Jack the Ripper. He's always walking around the smog filled streets. biggrin.png

In my bucket list: Pendine sands in S. Wales

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- just like Phuket except, no tuk-tuks, no hassles, quiet, etc. Maybe like Phuket was 30 years ago.

Just like Phuket?? Hmmm..........I bet the water temp off the coast is a bit different than the water temp in Phuket.

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Aussie dollar still looking good , has only dropped 2 baht. from 32 to 30. six years ago it was only 25 baht .

That's what I was thinking when I was reading the article.

Obviously the author is upset because his country's currency has dropped.

Not all currencies are dropping vs the baht.

But yes, things are more expensive than they used to be. (it's called inflation)

One item I've bought here year after year is Havana Club 3 year old rum. It was about ฿530 or less for years. Then suddenly ฿680 this year. That's not inflation, that's greed, like may things here. Plus the exchange rate should lower the price for most imported items, not raise them, including fuel. Again, greed.

Actually, that's not greed, that's taxes. Er... well yeah okay, same same.

But over the years booze and ciggie prices have fairly regularly risen due to increased taxes. And those increases are usually announced beforehand. Though that doesn't make them any easier to swallow...

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Aussie dollar still looking good , has only dropped 2 baht. from 32 to 30. six years ago it was only 25 baht .

That's what I was thinking when I was reading the article.

Obviously the author is upset because his country's currency has dropped.

Not all currencies are dropping vs the baht.

But yes, things are more expensive than they used to be. (it's called inflation)

One item I've bought here year after year is Havana Club 3 year old rum. It was about ฿530 or less for years. Then suddenly ฿680 this year. That's not inflation, that's greed, like may things here. Plus the exchange rate should lower the price for most imported items, not raise them, including fuel. Again, greed.

Actually, that's not greed, that's taxes. Er... well yeah okay, same same.

But over the years booze and ciggie prices have fairly regularly risen due to increased taxes. And those increases are usually announced beforehand. Though that doesn't make them any easier to swallow...

You can think that, but I know that other rums from the same region have not increased nearly as much, nor has the same red wine I've been drinking here for years. Yes there was a tax increase, but not by ฿150 per 750cl bottle. And again, the Baht has been high compared to the foreign currencies that these imports are bought with, so sorry, I'm not buying it. And once again oil is traded in US dollars which hit a several year low against the Baht, have fuel (gasoline) prices here dropped accordingly? The answer is no.

Edited by Jimi007

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You can think that, but I know that other rums from the same region have not increased nearly as much, nor has the same red wine I've been drinking here for years. Yes there was a tax increase, but not by ฿150 per 750cl bottle. And again, the Baht has been high compared to the foreign currencies that these imports are bought with, so sorry, I'm not buying it. And once again oil is traded in US dollars which hit a several year low against the Baht, have fuel (gasoline) prices here dropped accordingly? The answer is no.

<deleted> the value of oil have nothing to do with what is the value of USD, even if the prices are in US Dollars.

The value of each item sold is based of availability and not based of some countries currencies. Almost all currencies are floating, which basically means that the currencies are just some numbers, which changes represent how the countries are run.

If you say that value of an oil barrel is based of USD, then you are thinking in the same way as Thai bar gilrl who think "Ah, Euro is 38 baht so the people in Europe are 38 times richer than us". Very few of us get 20.000 Euros per month in Europe.

Oil is traded by it's current market value which is then reflected to the value of US dollar. If the value of oil keeps the same and the USD drops down, then the value of oil compared to the USD is higher.. this means that the barrel of oil is higher priced in USA. At the same time the barrel of oil might be lower priced in Thailand, Singapore and Australia.

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You can think that, but I know that other rums from the same region have not increased nearly as much, nor has the same red wine I've been drinking here for years. Yes there was a tax increase, but not by ฿150 per 750cl bottle. And again, the Baht has been high compared to the foreign currencies that these imports are bought with, so sorry, I'm not buying it. And once again oil is traded in US dollars which hit a several year low against the Baht, have fuel (gasoline) prices here dropped accordingly? The answer is no.

<deleted> the value of oil have nothing to do with what is the value of USD, even if the prices are in US Dollars.

The value of each item sold is based of availability and not based of some countries currencies. Almost all currencies are floating, which basically means that the currencies are just some numbers, which changes represent how the countries are run.

If you say that value of an oil barrel is based of USD, then you are thinking in the same way as Thai bar gilrl who think "Ah, Euro is 38 baht so the people in Europe are 38 times richer than us". Very few of us get 20.000 Euros per month in Europe.

Oil is traded by it's current market value which is then reflected to the value of US dollar. If the value of oil keeps the same and the USD drops down, then the value of oil compared to the USD is higher.. this means that the barrel of oil is higher priced in USA. At the same time the barrel of oil might be lower priced in Thailand, Singapore and Australia.

We are getting way off topic at this point! <deleted> is right! Since the Baht is a a several year high against the USD, then the price should be lower in Baht at the pump here simply because of the exchange rate. Just as any imported good should have declined, instead of increased. A barrel of oil has declined in the past month as well. http://www.moneyweek.com/news-and-charts/market-data/oil Have you noticed much of a decline at the gas pump?

Edited by Jimi007

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<deleted> is right! Since the Baht is a a several year high against the USD, then the price should be lower in Baht at the pump here simply because of the exchange rate. A barrel of oil has declined in the past month as well. http://www.moneyweek.com/news-and-charts/market-data/oil Have you noticed much of a decline at the gas pump?

Argh. You don't really get it, yet.

If we would have an common currency in the world, this would be much more simpler. In this case the price of the oil would be bound to this world currency, which is not changed what ever is changed in individual countries. This would be ideal situation to make clear how commodities are traded.

Actually there is few world wide currencies which show what is really going on. These are oil, gold and gas. The prices of these vary due demand and supply. You can buy bar of gold and trade that anywhere in the world for the price you purchased it.

Bath, Yen, USD, EURO they all just reflect the value how each of these monetary zones are doing compared to others.

In all. If one economical zone is failing to produce importance to the world, their currency will fail against the countries who do better. This is what have been happening to the Europe and to the USA for the past few decades.

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Mariners compass pub gorleston on sea norfolk uk £2.00 for a pint of carlsberg £1.50 for bottles fill ya boots!!!

I'll probably need to check what is the price of a beer at Taganga, Colombia at the moment. That's equally relevant as the price of the beer on the location you mentioned.

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One of the main issues with western tourists is their perception of Thailand. They all want the romantic image of 'old Siam' & still believe the stories told by their mates - you can get a beet for 5 pence etc... and the following:

  • Empty beaches with a few smiling locals selling coconuts - but still want access to food, beer, cigarettes & all the locals should of course speak perfect English
  • Litlle old ladies walking down the street, selling hand carved trinkets for tuppence - but still have perfectly paved streets & roads, have access to McDonalds, international standard doctors, PC repair shops, 3g connectivity, Iphone service & 10 MBPS wifi EVERYWHERE - of course with all these services provided in the Queens english
  • Elephants parading through the streets, man & beast in perfect harmony working together - of course being cared for in perfect conditions & NOT being circus entertainment
  • Tuk tuk & rickshaw vendors happily scurrying away whisking you from one place to the next, in perfect comfort & safety with a big smile - of course he speaks like an Oxford scollar
  • Silk suits/dresses- all made by yet another smilling goddess, who will be able to cater to you every whim due to her impecable graps of English
  • This should all of course cost next to nothing, whilst STILL by some MIRACLE affording the supplers of said services a decent quality of life - of course its Thailand and everything is a cheap as chips mate.
  • Finally all of this modern day convenience simply disappears into the myer as you sit on your desserted beach drinking your delicious rum punch cocktail from your smiling would be bartender & hey why not tip him its only 50 pence!

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The Thai government should take time to think about the value of the Thai baht as they rely heavily on tourism from the west, which if they do nothing, will rapidly diminish.

Tourism to Thailand accounts for between 5% to 6% of Thai GDP. If most tourists are now coming from Russia, China and Australia, then the percentage from Western tourists is probably less than 3% of GDP. Kind of makes your statement that the Thai government "relies" on it, rather silly.

The major benefit of a strong Baht is cheaper energy costs as oil is denominated in US dollars. If oil is cheap, the cost of most manufactured products also become cheaper due to either oil as a source for a raw material (i.e. plastics, fertilizers) and/or transportation costs go down. This leads to higher profits for Thai manufacturers.

The tourism industry to Thailand may only be 6% of GDP, but it employs around 27% of the working population, either directly, or indirectly.

A shrinking tourism industry for Thailand will not hurt GDP so much, but means a lot of unemployed Thai's.

Edited by NamKangMan

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still not convinced, the same was said for Bail after the bombing - normal service has resumed, albeit after some time

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still not convinced, the same was said for Bail after the bombing - normal service has resumed, albeit after some time

The Bali bombings were major terrorist attacks. Tourists have flocked back to Bali because they believe their safety and security is fine there now.

The same can't be said for Phuket. The same BS scams and rip offs are STILL here, after so many years.

Nothing postive has been implemented here for tourists, or the tourism industry, in years.

Phuket is failing due to bad management. Hardly "same same" as the Bali bombings.

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Just to put it all in perspective, way back in 1996 I only got 36 baht per pound, A very few years later it went as high as 90 baht (for a very few days). My point is that exchange rates fluctuate up and down over time.

The best I ever got was 89.95.

True what you say, but in addition things have got much more expensive here!

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Just to put it all in perspective, way back in 1996 I only got 36 baht per pound, A very few years later it went as high as 90 baht (for a very few days). My point is that exchange rates fluctuate up and down over time.

Right now though LIK is a bit of a double whammy.

Everything getting more and more expensive on top of the poor exchange rates.

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still not convinced, the same was said for Bail after the bombing - normal service has resumed, albeit after some time

The Bali bombings were major terrorist attacks. Tourists have flocked back to Bali because they believe their safety and security is fine there now.

The same can't be said for Phuket. The same BS scams and rip offs are STILL here, after so many years.

Nothing postive has been implemented here for tourists, or the tourism industry, in years.

Phuket is failing due to bad management. Hardly "same same" as the Bali bombings.

Granted hardly the same - but still bad press & perceived lack of safety are two of the major points. The tourism industry here IS growing year on year, the problem lies with the quality (perceived or not) and the spend per tourist ratio

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