Jump to content
BANGKOK
Sign in to follow this  
webfact

Songkran Alcohol Ban Mulled In A Move To Reduce Deaths During Holiday

Recommended Posts

ACCIDENTS
Roads in Thailand the sixth most dangerous

JINTANA PANYAARVUDH
THE NATION

30202575-01_big.JPG

Songkran alcohol ban mulled in a move to reduce deaths during holiday

BANGKOK: -- The Alcoholic Beverage Control Committee will on Monday consider whether to issue a ban on the sale of alcohol during the Songkran holiday period, Songkran Pakchokdee, director of the Anti-Alcohol Organisations Network, told The Nation.


A ban, aimed at reducing deaths from road accidents over the period, will be proposed by Dr Saman Futrakul, director of the Disease Control Department's Office of Alcoholic Beverage and Tobacco Consumption Control Committee.

March-23-Accident.jpg

The committee, chaired by Public Health Minister Pradit Sinthawanarong, is expected to announce a decision on Monday. If the proposed ban is passed, it will be submitted for final approval to the National Alcohol Beverage Policy Committee, chaired by Deputy Prime Minister Plodprasop Suraswadi, on March 28, in time for next month's water festival.

Saman's earlier proposal for a year-round ban on the sale of alcohol on pavements, roadside areas and public walkways was shelved by Plodprasob's committee last December.

Thailand currently bans alcohol sales on four major religious holidays: Makha Bucha Day, Visakha Bucha Day, Asarnha Bucha Day and Buddhist Lent Day.

In related news, the Thailand Accident Research Centre (TARC) recently conducted a study into accidents on Thai roads over the past 20 years.

Kunnawee Kanitpong, who headed the research, said that statistics for 1993-2011 road accidents and fatalities gathered by two agencies - the National Police Office and the Public Health Ministry - varied significantly (see graphic).

Prommin Kantiya, director of the Accident Prevention Network, said Thailand lacked a single systematic process to gather such information.

He said police statistics only covered cases in which victims had died on the same day as their accidents, while the Public Health Ministry collects follow-up information for another 30 days and therefore records a much higher number of road-accident fatalities.

However, the number of road deaths recorded by the Health Ministry is still lower than that gathered by the World Health Organisation (WHO). Last month the WHO reported that up to 26,000 people are killed in road accidents every year in Thailand, which places the country as sixth-highest in the world for road fatalities.

The TARC research indicates that integration of relevant agencies is necessary to gain a true reflection of trends in road use and the toll that road accidents take, said Kunnawee.

The research study, the fruit of almost a year's work, will be forwarded to the Road Safety Centre and published in a book this year.

nationlogo.jpg
-- The Nation 2013-03-23

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why don't they ban driving during Songkran. That would reduce road fatalities. People can stay home and drink, though.

+10 thumbsup.gifclap2.gif But what about the Bus and Taxi drivers whistling.gif not forgetting the BIB w00t.gif

Edited by sjjmmi
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More hot air that no one will pay attention to. They can introduce all the bans they want but grog can always be found and the BIB will make extra pocket money going around to " fine " those breaching the ban. This is as useful as the road safety campaigns that achieve nothing and don't even sound good anymore

I wonder if the clowns who come out with this rubbish actually believe it themselves or is it on a calendar under " time to make another stupid public announcement ' ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The focus of this is wrong, it isn't the alcohol that needs to be banned, it's the people who need to be educated on the dangers of drinking and driving. This is defeated in more developed countries by providing free and more frequent public transport during the festive seasons. This will obviously not work as there is a severe lack of a sufficient public transport infrastructure in Thailand. So for now, channeling money into adverts and education is the only way they can at least try to bring down the drunk driving fatalities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I think we could talk about the knowing the sex of angels for years and will never find any solution ...... the only problem here is Thais think they are the best driver in the world , oh yes I heard that so many time ... All those dead ? that's their Karma .....nothing to do with lack of education in driving , courtesy etc ..... A deep change is needed in the mentality but no government never took that seriously. as foreigner , we just have to drive the way we would do in our country and try to avoid the crazy drivers here.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So this proposed new measure will keep death & carnage off the roads during the festival period ??

By baning the sale of alcohol over the three day festival, widely publicised beforehand of course so Joe public can stock up on their favourite brew, still enjoy their 3 day beer fest & the government keeps it's revenue coming in, problem solved!!

PROBLEM NOT SOLVED!!

Are they not capable of thinking any policy through to the end ??

People will stock up on alcohol ahead of the festival & still feel the need to drive.. this will never stop drink driving in a million years !!

Police mounting road blocks on every corner with the advisory reading: if you drink & drive during this period you WILL be banned automatically for a year, you WILL go to jail for 6 months, you WILL pay a huge fine, your insurance cover WILL double in price..

As in other countries this WILL have more effect !!

EXCELLANT IDEA

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...