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3 Thai Universities Named Among 100 Best In Asia

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my wife likes to claim chula is the best in thailand, but why is it lower than the 2 others? anybody ?

A friend of mine is lecturer at KMUTT, he said to me a little while ago about Chula being believed to be the "best" by the Thai's and then went on to tell me a bit of Chula's history. So, it could be because it was the 1st institute of its kind here in Thailand (as apposed to Siam) and the fact that Rama V has very strong ties with it. Also, did she study there?

Many Thais I know regard Chula and Kasetsart as the Thia equivalent of Oxbridge. This is more to do with the fact that they are not "private" univesties and therefore open to anyone with ability (in theory, the same as Oxbridge).

They are more circumspect about the private universities which may be more inclined to focus on those with ability to pay only.

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my wife likes to claim chula is the best in thailand, but why is it lower than the 2 others? anybody ?

Because she understands what most educated westerners do not; that the true value of college lies in the contacts you make there and the perceived value of the degree in the market where one plans to work.Locals are not interested in education, only credentials.

What is amusing is that there is so much enthusiasm for having three universities placing in the lower half of the top 100 rankings. How many bonafide universities are there in the region anyway? If Thailand ever learns to value winning instead of just being in the game they will follow in the footsteps of Los Angeles, who threw the Rams out of town because the city refused to be associated with losers.

Edited by unanimosity

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I think a place like Mahidol could truly go through the roof if they simply started paying good salaries.

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What some of the posters here, not to mention the headline writer, seem to have missed is that this is not a ranking of the 'best' universities.

Hint: the article mentions the word 'research' no less than 15 times.

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I think a place like Mahidol could truly go through the roof if they simply started paying good salaries.

Their academics, and academics everywhere in this country, need to start publishing in reputable international journals....of course this is difficult for most, due to the advanced writing skills needed (noting that most westerners do not know how to write such publications), and original, non plagiarized thinking is required. The standard of research skill and methodology is often not up to par also. When Thailand allows itself international criticism of it's research work, then it will move forward more rapidly, both as a member of AEC and Internationally.

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I think a place like Mahidol could truly go through the roof if they simply started paying good salaries.

Their academics, and academics everywhere in this country, need to start publishing in reputable international journals....of course this is difficult for most, due to the advanced writing skills needed (noting that most westerners do not know how to write such publications), and original, non plagiarized thinking is required. The standard of research skill and methodology is often not up to par also. When Thailand allows itself international criticism of it's research work, then it will move forward more rapidly, both as a member of AEC and Internationally.

I agree with what you have said. You essentially expanded on my point a little, but what I am saying is get some good foreign researchers in there, and pay them well (100k and up). These people DO exist in Thailand, I assure you. HOPEFULLY, and that is a big hopefully :), the Thai staff can learn from what they are doing, and things would work from there. Part of the job description could even be helping Thai staff with getting published etc, or bonuses based on this. The problem is, Thai people don't like to listen to foreigners. I have no idea how Thais are going to evolve with that mind set; they need to get over that hurdle one day. It is just a hard point to understand on all sides.

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I think a place like Mahidol could truly go through the roof if they simply started paying good salaries.

Their academics, and academics everywhere in this country, need to start publishing in reputable international journals....of course this is difficult for most, due to the advanced writing skills needed (noting that most westerners do not know how to write such publications), and original, non plagiarized thinking is required. The standard of research skill and methodology is often not up to par also. When Thailand allows itself international criticism of it's research work, then it will move forward more rapidly, both as a member of AEC and Internationally.
I agree with what you have said. You essentially expanded on my point a little, but what I am saying is get some good foreign researchers in there, and pay them well (100k and up). These people DO exist in Thailand, I assure you. HOPEFULLY, and that is a big hopefully smile.png, the Thai staff can learn from what they are doing, and things would work from there. Part of the job description could even be helping Thai staff with getting published etc, or bonuses based on this. The problem is, Thai people don't like to listen to foreigners. I have no idea how Thais are going to evolve with that mind set; they need to get over that hurdle one day. It is just a hard point to understand on all sides.
Thanks I agree with you - the low university salary is one reason why I prefer to work in a high school. There will be the occasional good professor from overseas who will work here, but the ones I know are already retired in their home countries and don't really need the salary. From my point of view, 100K would be a good salary, but still not enough to attract many who have debts to pay back home. Thais who have studied overseas, such as my wife, have no problems asking for help editing their work; as that's what they were used to from their overseas experience. The problem seems to be the local academics who are the ones too proud to ask for help. Hence, their work is rarely published in overseas journals.
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All this Reasoning, years have past and still they cant they speak English properly.?. Ive met hundreds of Uni Kids, and bar girl English leaves em standing. Cant just be Me that's noticed it. You get Introduced to a Thai English Teacher here and hes useles as well..coffee1.gif

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I think a place like Mahidol could truly go through the roof if they simply started paying good salaries.

Their academics, and academics everywhere in this country, need to start publishing in reputable international journals....of course this is difficult for most, due to the advanced writing skills needed (noting that most westerners do not know how to write such publications), and original, non plagiarized thinking is required. The standard of research skill and methodology is often not up to par also. When Thailand allows itself international criticism of it's research work, then it will move forward more rapidly, both as a member of AEC and Internationally.
I agree with what you have said. You essentially expanded on my point a little, but what I am saying is get some good foreign researchers in there, and pay them well (100k and up). These people DO exist in Thailand, I assure you. HOPEFULLY, and that is a big hopefully smile.png, the Thai staff can learn from what they are doing, and things would work from there. Part of the job description could even be helping Thai staff with getting published etc, or bonuses based on this. The problem is, Thai people don't like to listen to foreigners. I have no idea how Thais are going to evolve with that mind set; they need to get over that hurdle one day. It is just a hard point to understand on all sides.
Thanks I agree with you - the low university salary is one reason why I prefer to work in a high school. There will be the occasional good professor from overseas who will work here, but the ones I know are already retired in their home countries and don't really need the salary. From my point of view, 100K would be a good salary, but still not enough to attract many who have debts to pay back home. Thais who have studied overseas, such as my wife, have no problems asking for help editing their work; as that's what they were used to from their overseas experience. The problem seems to be the local academics who are the ones too proud to ask for help. Hence, their work is rarely published in overseas journals.

I looked into university work too. Mahidol did attract me, I must say, until I saw the salaries. I would be qualified, and I am not trying to make this about me, just a point. I too work with high schoolers now, on a pretty decent salary. It isn't my ideal job, but I am going to go where the money is; it's that simple.

Based on your post, maybe the key is for these places to start hiring only Thai researchers educated overseas? I must reiterate, I do try to stay culturally understanding, but this point about them not wanting to learn from or accept expertise from other countries often mystifies me. It is not good, and there is just nothing that we can do about it (confused).

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KMUTT has strong research themes. Pay is good and they make us work really hard. Glad to see KMUTT on the list though :)

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Many Thais I know regard Chula and Kasetsart as the Thia equivalent of Oxbridge. This is more to do with the fact that they are not "private" univesties and therefore open to anyone with ability (in theory, the same as Oxbridge). They are more circumspect about the private universities which may be more inclined to focus on those with ability to pay only.

Actually, Chula and Thammasat have traditionally been regarded as the Thai equivalent of Oxbridge and are the oldest and second oldest universities in Thailand respectively.

Edited by somchai jones

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Many Thais I know regard Chula and Kasetsart as the Thia equivalent of Oxbridge. This is more to do with the fact that they are not "private" univesties and therefore open to anyone with ability (in theory, the same as Oxbridge). They are more circumspect about the private universities which may be more inclined to focus on those with ability to pay only.

Actually, Chula and Thammasat have traditionally been regarded as the Thai equivalent of Oxbridge and are the oldest and second oldest universities in Thailand respectively.

I've found that SIIT at Thammasart really have lowered the bar for entrance the last couple of years. A couple of students who failed physics/maths at school told me smugly how they got into SIIT to do engineering of all things! If SIIT has any standard at all these students will not get through first year, based on the school performance.

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