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Three Foreigners Arrested Over A T M Fraud In Phuket


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A simple authenticator (either as a keyring device or as a free app on your smartphone) will do the trick. Add biometrics if you're paranoid.

- Something you have

- Something you know

- Something you are

One of my banks have them, but if you lose it, have it stolen, or it gets broken, you're in some trouble.

No, you simply get a new one.

Great. I'm sure you do get a new one.

How do you get a new one when your bank is in Russin/UK/America/Europe etc and you are on holiday on Phuket for 10 nights???????? smile.png

How do you get your money out for your holiday?

Even if someone is back home and gets your post and gives you the code over the phone, you are still waiting 3 days to access your money.

So now you've already gone to the point where you need one to get money from an ATM?

Is not going to happen.

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Interesting that banks from western countries cover the losses from fraud while Thailand banks do not.

As this is a 6 year old topic and is out of date, topic is closed. 

Skimming is becoming more and more prevalent - what are the banks doing to ensure their ATM's are skim-free?

Also, the news report shows 3 people and lists 3 names - but then it switches to 4 and then back to 3...who edits these articles?

I have always wondered WHY the banks can't have an OTP (one time password) sent via SMS for every ATM transaction, just like they do for internet banking transactions.

The "skimmer" would also have to steal your phone - highly unlikely.

Surely this would be easy to implement and would make skimming a thing of the past, virtually overnight.

If that happened and I were a thief, I'd switch from skimming to mugging so I could be sure of getting the phone too.

You do know that SMS has a default timeout of three days, and some aren't delivered at all, don't you? What happens when you're standing at a busy ATM waiting for several minutes for a verificaiton SMS that might never arrive? Do you think banks haven't considered this? Fortunately, they tend to think ideas through to the end rather than just posting on a web forum demanding to know why other people aren't doing them NOW.

Edited by RogueLeader
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It's not at all clear from this article how or where they were skimming the actual customer cards. In the photo we see the cards, 2 card readers, 1 card reader/writer and a couple of laptops. None of the items in the photo would have been used to skim cards at ATM's.

The woman who lost 100,000 says it was taken from Vietnam, that sounds odd as they have strict daily limits on withdrawals in Vietnam for foreign cards regardless of the cards own limit, also it's unlikely to have been withdrawn by these guys unless they just got back from Vietnam.

The usual MO is for the details to be skimmed in one country, then emailed to a gang like this to withdraw the money on a percentage basis. It would be unusual for the gang to be involved in skimming and using the cards at the same time.

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@ stevenl

It would be very easy to implement. Similar software is already in use for internet banking.

There are no "roaming charges" to receive an SMS. Second time I have mentioned that.

Australia has one of the highest mobile phone ownership statistics in the world, per capita, for a country of only 22 million people. See below link. (dated 2007 - I am sure the stats are higher now)

http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/med_tel_mob_cel_percap-telephones-mobile-cellular-per-capita

Also, the phone only needs to receive an SMS. It can be any cheap basic phone, or an old phone. It doesn't have to be an expensive smart phone.

"A losing proposition" is what the banks are doing now - and that is, NOTHING.

In relation to the little code generating keyring, I declined to have one for the reasons I mentioned. Another member suggested they be used with an ATM, not myself.

Edited by NamKangMan
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@ stevenl

It would be very easy to implement. Similar software is already in use for internet banking.

There are no "roaming charges" to receive an SMS. Second time I have mentioned that.

Australia has one of the highest mobile phone ownership statistics in the world, per capita, for a country of only 22 million people. See below link. (dated 2007 - I am sure the stats are higher now)

http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/med_tel_mob_cel_percap-telephones-mobile-cellular-per-capita

Also, the phone only needs to receive an SMS. It can be any cheap basic phone, or an old phone. It doesn't have to be an expensive smart phone.

"A losing proposition" is what the banks are doing now - and that is, NOTHING.

My US phone will not receive an SMS from the US or anywhere else here in Thailand. My US carrier uses CDMA phones. It use to work, but no more. So much for that "solution."

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@ stevenl

It would be very easy to implement. Similar software is already in use for internet banking.

There are no "roaming charges" to receive an SMS. Second time I have mentioned that.

Australia has one of the highest mobile phone ownership statistics in the world, per capita, for a country of only 22 million people. See below link. (dated 2007 - I am sure the stats are higher now)

http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/med_tel_mob_cel_percap-telephones-mobile-cellular-per-capita

Also, the phone only needs to receive an SMS. It can be any cheap basic phone, or an old phone. It doesn't have to be an expensive smart phone.

"A losing proposition" is what the banks are doing now - and that is, NOTHING.

There are roaming charges for an SMS from many countries. If not for receiving it has to be for sending. Maybe not from yours, but for many others there are. Who is going to pay for those, the banks? Second time I have mentioned this.

Many banks don't use this software but more advanced software, you were the one talking about smartphones, which have now disappeared from your stat, and no, no losing proposition for the banks at the moment, and no, they are not doing nothing. They are taking action, what and how depends on where you are from (or better, where your bank is from and which bank you're using).

Edited by stevenl
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@ RogueLeader

I would like to know the stats for "delayed" SMS compared to SMS received instantly - it would be a small percentage, but you are correct, it does happen.

I offered a suggestion of a transaction of $100 or less would not trigger the OTP feature. So, if your SMS is delayed, $100 will feed you, or put gas in the tank etc etc and you can try again later.

It was only a suggestion. I haven't claimed to have perfecetd the idea. :) :)

I have OTP for my Kasikorn internet banking. If Kasikorn offered it to me for ATM use, I would gladly accept the service. Each to their own.

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@ stevenl

It would be very easy to implement. Similar software is already in use for internet banking.

There are no "roaming charges" to receive an SMS. Second time I have mentioned that.

Australia has one of the highest mobile phone ownership statistics in the world, per capita, for a country of only 22 million people. See below link. (dated 2007 - I am sure the stats are higher now)

http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/med_tel_mob_cel_percap-telephones-mobile-cellular-per-capita

Also, the phone only needs to receive an SMS. It can be any cheap basic phone, or an old phone. It doesn't have to be an expensive smart phone.

"A losing proposition" is what the banks are doing now - and that is, NOTHING.

There are roaming charges for an SMS from many countries. If not for receiving it has to be for sending. Maybe not from yours, but for many others there are. Who is going to pay for those, the banks? Second time I have mentioned this.

Many banks don't use this software but more advanced software, you were the one talking about smartphones, which have now disappeared from your stat, and no, no losing proposition for the banks at the moment, and no, they are not doing nothing. They are taking action, what and how depends on where you are from (or better, where your bank is from and which bank you're using).

Yes, there are roam charges to send a SMS - I was talking about receiving the SMS. Obviously, the bank, one way or another, would pass on the cost to the consumer.

What "advanced software" are you talking about????

"Chips" have been entered to the credit/debit cards - but they can also be "read." Tell me, what have the banks done to the ATM to stop skimming????

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@ stevenl

It would be very easy to implement. Similar software is already in use for internet banking.

There are no "roaming charges" to receive an SMS. Second time I have mentioned that.

Australia has one of the highest mobile phone ownership statistics in the world, per capita, for a country of only 22 million people. See below link. (dated 2007 - I am sure the stats are higher now)

http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/med_tel_mob_cel_percap-telephones-mobile-cellular-per-capita

Also, the phone only needs to receive an SMS. It can be any cheap basic phone, or an old phone. It doesn't have to be an expensive smart phone.

"A losing proposition" is what the banks are doing now - and that is, NOTHING.

My US phone will not receive an SMS from the US or anywhere else here in Thailand. My US carrier uses CDMA phones. It use to work, but no more. So much for that "solution."

Of course, you could also just give your US bank your Thai number. :) :)

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Have fun NKM, I'm not going further in another pointless discussion with you, as usual your twisting and turning everything that has been said. You've thrown your mud at the wall again, it doesn't stick.

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Interesting that banks from western countries cover the losses from fraud while Thailand banks do not.

Yes it is. That's why I have two accounts with one Thai bank. I simply go online and transfer the amount I want to withdraw from the ATM to the account with little to no money in it...

Me Same Same.

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